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Why does the earth need the north and south poles?

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2010-12-05 20:14:19
2010-12-05 20:14:19

Without them we would all be frozen because the north and south are like magnetic poles

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There are no "magnetic north poles", only one. (There is also a magnetic south pole.)The reason is that the magnetic poles change over time.


== == Earth happens to have two North poles, but it is not necessary. * The geographic north pole is one of the two places where the axis of rotation meets the surface. All planets and stars have one geographic north pole and one geographic south pole. * The north magnetic pole is the point where the magnetic field points directly down, and the south magnetic pole is the point where the magnetic field points directly up. Earth happens to have one magnetic north pole and one magnetic south pole at the moment. Mars doesn't have any magnetic poles. Our sun often has dozens of magnetic north and magnetic south poles in or near its sunspots.


You can't. You also need a longitude to go along with the latitude. There are only two points on earth that you can find with only latitude ... the north and south poles.


-- Since you're asking for "parallels", we know that the discussion concerns latitude.-- The total extent of latitude on the Earth is 180 degrees.-- The north and south poles are degenerate "parallels", i.e. circles with zero radiusat 90 degrees north and south latitude.-- If we draw in all the rest of the parallels between the poles at intervals of5 degrees, we'll need to draw 35 of them.


Centripetal Acceleration is the scientific reason for why someone would weigh less while at the North or South Poles. However, there is only a slight weight difference.


To answer this question we need to know south or north of what.


Bees will not survive a cold winter. They also need lots of flowering trees and crops to survive. There are no bees in the polar regions.


Since the Earth is roughly spherical (ball-shaped), you can head out either eastwardor westward from the International Dateline and wind up anywhere you want to be.If Dubai is your final destination and you are presently anywhere on the InternationalDateline ... with two exceptions ... then the shortest route to Dubai is westwardfrom your present location.The exceptions are the very end-points of the International Dateline at the north andsouth poles. At the poles, there is no such thing as 'east' or 'west', so no matterwhere your final destination is, you would need to head out toward the south fromthe north pole, or towards the north from the south one.


No, it can but it doesn't necessarily need a variable. I have no idea what the previous answer means. The earth spins on its axis. The spin axis provide the geographic north and south poles. On the other hand the earth's magnetism does not work like a bar magnet. Instead, the iron and cobalt core spins at a slightly faster rate than the rest of the earth. This sets up eddy electrical currents which creates magnetic fields. In the northern hemisphere, the magnetic fields join under Northern Canada.


The chemicals from the garbage, gets into the air and melts cold things like ice in the north and south poles where penguins and polar bears need the ice.


No point on earth has both a north and a south coordinate (except for points onthe equator where the latitude is zero and it doesn't matter whether it's north orsouth).You need one number north or south, and one more number that's east or west.Then we can figure out where you are.


Of what? North and south are directions - you have to say where you're starting from in order to know if you need to go north or south to get to Maine.


They will attract each other. They don't even need to be near... they're attracting all the time.


If that's what you're seeing, then you're only looking at 1/4 of the earth, or less.The half of the earth between the equator and the south pole has all 'S' latitudes.But the other half, between the equator and the north pole has all ' N ' latitudes.With the north and south poles of the earth pointing up and down, half of the earthon one side has all 'E' longitudes, and the half on the other side has all 'W' longitudes.You need to turn your globe around, or flip to another page in your atlas.


If that's what you're seeing, then you're only looking at 1/4 of the earth, at most.The half of the earth between the equator and the south pole has all 'S' latitudes, andthe half between the equator and the north pole has all ' N ' latitudes.With the north and south poles of the earth pointing up and down, half of the earthon one side has all 'E' longitudes, and the half on the other side has all 'W' longitudes.You need to turn your globe around, or flip to another page in your atlas.


The Prime Meridian is an imaginary line that connects the north and south poles.If you look at a globe, you realize that there could be millions of lines that do that,so you need some more information to figure out exactly which one of them is thePrime Meridian. Here it is: The Prime Meridian is the line that joins the north andthe south poles, and also runs through the Royal Observatory in the town ofGreenwich, which is a suburb of London, England.


Every "line" of constant longitude joins the north and south poles, so the lines "run" north and south. Longitude numbers range from zero to 180 degrees east and from zero 180 degrees west. So all together, there are 360 degrees of longitude, which is exactly what you need if you want to use longitude to measure any place all around the Earth.


No, to get north or south you need to suspend a magnet.


There was some slavery, for a time, in the North, but there were more crops in the South than in the North, e.g. less need in the north.


Once you've reached the south pole, you can only move away from the pole. And since you are moving away from the south pole you can't be traveling south. Aha! But you CAN travel south from the south pole. It's just that you will need a space ship to do it. We do not have two poles, called 'north' and 'south'. The pole is one line that continues indefinitely in a straight line, up from both 'poles' on the globe, as we call them for convenience. Hop in your ship, set your course along the pole, and fly south for ever.


Electrical charges and magnetic poles have a few things in common, the least of which is their inherent relation in one often creating the other. Both have opposing ends (positive is to negative as north is to south) and neither need to touch in order to attract or repel.


i need that question answered too!! i need that question answered too!! ^^^ That helps no one... 90 degrees north or south of the equator is the North or South Pole.


Probably because the North could not act alone without the south


"90 degrees south" is the location of the south pole. It's located in the middle ofthe Antarctic continent, and there's no country there.Note:Since all of the world's longitudes converge (come together) at the poles, we don't evenneed to know the longitude. The poles are the only points on Earth where that's true ...where you can pin-point a location with only one coordinate.


They will repel each other. Here is a explanation: "-" means they will attract "*" means they will repel South-North North-South North*North South*South Basically, they need to be opposite to attract each other :)



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