Computer Networking

Why is Cat5e faster than cat5?

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2009-12-02 14:26:33
2009-12-02 14:26:33

The "e" in Cat-5 stands for enhanced. A Cat-5 cable has more twists than a Cat-5 cable, meaning that there will be less crosstalk and interference.

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Yes, the e stands for enhanced. The Cat5e cable is just made to more stringent standards the the regular Cat5 cable.


CAT6 doubles the bandwidth of CAT5 and CAT5e to 250 mhz. It is backwards compatible with CAT5, so is a good choice of cable if you aren't sure what to choose.


CAT6 natively supports 1Gbps and higher while for CAT5e it is a stretch. CAT6 operates at 250MHz while CAT5e does it at 100MHz. CAT6 does have reduced length compared to CAT5e but it has higher requirements for noise level and crosstalk. CAT5 is absolute.


CAT6 cables do provide better signal strength and bandwith than CAT5, but for most purposes CAT5e will work just as well and be cheaper.


Cat5 is rated for 10Mbit operation. Cat5e rated for 100Mbit, and Cat6 rated for 1000Mbit


The only difference between CAT5 and CAT5e is that CAT5e has a higher standard of testing, which makes transmission of data at higher speed more reliable. CAT5e is reccomended if you are running a gigabit ethernet network, though CAT5 is acceptable.


Per segment, the limit is 100 meters.


another name for an ethernet cable is a cat5 or cat5e cable


Cat5, Cat5e, Cat6, and Cat6e can be used, u can always use a better cable than required, but not the other way around


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Cat5e is required for the standard for gigabit ethernet; cat5 is only good for up to 100Mbps. Cat6 is better than cat5e; it will probably give you lower signal degradation over longer distances and less interference from external sources, which can improve speed and quality of connections. You could run gigabit ethernet over normal cat5, but the standard makes no promises about how well it will work. Cat5e and cat6 differ from cat5 in having more twists per inch, which reduces interference at the cost of using more copper.


Difference between a cat 5 5e and 6 networking cable? Cat5 cable is broken into two separate categories: Cat5 and Cat5E cables. Cat5 has become obsolete in recent years, due to its limitations compared to Cat5E and Cat6 cables. Although the Cat5 cable can handle up to 10/100 Mbps at a 100MHz bandwidth (which was once considered quite efficient), the newer versions of Cat cables are significantly faster. Cat5E cable (which stands for "Cat5 Enhanced") became the standard cable about 15 years ago and offers significantly improved performance over the old Cat5 cable, including up to 10 times faster speeds and a significantly greater ability to traverse distances. Cat6 cables have been around for only a few years less than Cat5E cables. However, they have primarily been used as the backbone to networks, instead of being run to workstations themselves. The reason for this (beyond cost) is the fact that, while Cat6 cables can handle up to 10 Gigabits of data, that bandwidth is limited to 164 feet - anything beyond that will rapidly decay to only 1 Gigabit (the same as Cat5E). Cat6A is the newest iteration and utilizes an exceptionally thick plastic casing that helps further reduce crosstalk. The biggest distinguishing difference between Cat6 and Cat6A cables is that Cat6A can maintain 10 Gigabit speeds for the full 328 feet of Ethernet cable.


You can use the Cat6 in place of the Cat5e but not the other way around. It is a higher rating than the Cat5e.


cat3 is working on 10mbps speed and cat5 and cat5e are able to work on 100mbps speed


CAT5e adds support for far-end crosstalk. This accounts for the possibility for interference in the signal, making your connection more robust as a result. anonymous@oola.com


Cat5 vs Cat5e vs Cat6 vs Cat7 CablesCat5 and Cat5e and Cat6 and Cat7 are different standards for cables. If you are wondering if these names of some species of cats, you are wrong. These are types of twisted copper cables that are used to transmit data through network and also used in home theater applications. Category 5 (Cat5), Category 5e, and category 6 are the names given to these cables depending upon their performance level. Telecommunication Industry Association (TIA) and Electronic Industries Association (EIA) are organizations that set guidelines for the production of these cables which help manufacturers to classify these cables.Cat5Cat5 has almost become a standard for connecting Ethernet devices world over. It is inexpensive and very effective. It is also available readily making it the most commonly used cable for connecting Ethernet devices. It is available in two types, the Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP), and the Screened Twisted Pair (SCTP). UTP is used in the US on a huge basis. SCTP has a protective covering as a means of protection against interferences. Cat5 cables are either solid or stranded. To transmit data over long distances, solid Cat5 is ideal as it is rigid, but stranded Cat5 is good to patch cables. Cat5 has the capacity to support 10-100 Mbps and 100MHz.However, in the last few years, there has been a gradual shift from standard 10/100 networks to gigabit networks which has sounded death knells for Cat5 as it cannot support such high speeds. This led to a new type of cables that are an upgrade version of Cat5, known as Cat5e.Cat5eThese cables came into existence only to make Cat5 compatible with gigabit networks. They also help extra protection from interference from other cables. However, 5e cannot remove interference completely which results in slow and poor performance. Nevertheless, 5e does make the network more reliable and quicker than Cat5.Cat6Cat6 is much more advanced than both Cat5 and Cat5e and also gives a much better performance. Though it is made up of 4 twisted pairs of copper cables just like Cat5 and Cat5e, it is much better because of a basic difference in designing. This difference comes from a longitudinal separator. This separator keeps all 4 wires separate from one another which helps in reducing cross talk, also known as interference. It also allows for a faster transfer of data. Cat6 has double the bandwidth of Cat5. It is capable of supporting 10 gigabit Ethernet and can operate at 250MHz.If you think of future and possible technological advances, it is better to go with Cat6. What is more, Cat6 is backward compatible which means it can be used in any network that employed Cat5 and Cat5e.However, because of its thicker size, you may have difficulty in using your regular RJ45 connectors, and you may have to use special connectors for the purpose.Cat7It is the next generation cabling device for Ethernet connections. It is an improvement upon both Cat5 and Cat6 in terms of internal signaling and exterior protection. These cables are able to support 10gigabit connections and a re adaptable with standard Ethernet connectors.


RJ-45 is the terminating end on a cat5 cat5e cable :) it contains 8 twisted wire pairs, hope this answers your question. Note use cat5e cables and u wont have to worry ....


Typically, Cat6 has thicker wires than Cat5 (20-22 gauge as opposed to 22-24 gauge for Cat5), and has much tighter control over twists per centimetre on the pairs, and on capacitance between pairs. In practice, Cat6 cable often has a plastic divider that isolates the four pairs. In use, Cat5e cable can usually carry up to 300 megabits per second, while Cat6 carries 1000 megabits per second. Both Cat5 (and Cat5e) and Cat6 have eight wires, arranged as four twisted pairs, but Cat6 is specified as using all four pairs for signalling, while Cat5 uses only two pairs.


10BASE-T can use CAT3 cabling or better, while 100BASE-T requires CAT5 or better (such as CAT5e or CAT6).


CAT5 (also, CAT 5) is an Ethernet network cable standard defined by the Electronic Industries Association and Telecommunications Industry Association (commonly known as EIA/TIA). CAT5 is the fifth generation of twisted pair Ethernet technology and the most popular of all twisted pair cables in use today.CAT5 cable contains four pairs of copper wire. It supports Fast Ethernet speeds (up to 100 Mbps). As with all other types of twisted pair EIA/TIA cabling, CAT5 cable runs are limited to a maximum recommended run length of 100m (328 feet).Although CAT5 cable usually contains four pairs of copper wire, Fast Ethernet communications only utilize two pairs. A newer specification for CAT5 cable - CAT5 enhanced ("CAT5e" or "CAT 5e") - supports networking at Gigabit Ethernet speeds (up to 1000 Mbps) over short distances by utilizing all four wire pairs, and it is backward-compatible with ordinary CAT5.Twisted pair cable like CAT5 comes in two main varieties, solid and stranded. Solid CAT5 cable supports longer length runs and works best in fixed wiring configurations like office buildings. Stranded CAT5 cable, on the other hand, is more pliable and better suited for shorter-distance, movable cabling such as on-the-fly patch cabling.Though newer cable technologies like CAT6 and CAT7 are in development, CAT5 / CAT5e Ethernet cable remains the popular choice for most wired local area networks (LANs), because Ethernet gear is both affordable and supports high speeds.Also Known as :CATegory 5


To wire Cat5 patch panels, it is done similarly to the way a regular Cat 5 panel is. You should make sure everything is connected correclty, hook it to the device, and the wall.


Assuming you mean Cat5 and Cat5e, Category 5 and Category 5 Enhanced Unshielded Twisted Pair networking wire, the major difference is tighter control on the twists per inch on the wire pairs, and tighter tolerance on the capacitance per linear foot. Cat5 UTP cable will carry up to 100 megabits per second reliably. In theory, Cat5e UTP cable can carry up to 1000 megabits per second, but in actual usage, most gigabit network hardware will degrade to 300 megabits per second when transmitting over Cat5e cable.


The connector is a RJ-45 connector, allowing 4 twisted pairs to be terminated to the 8 pin connector system. The connection is compatible with CAT5 and CAT6 cable systems although the performance of the cable is lower than CAT 5, CAT5e and CAT6.


CAT5 is an Ethernet cable standard defined by the Electronic Industries Association and Telecommunications Industry Association (commonly known as EIA/TIA). CAT5 is the 5th generation of twisted pair Ethernet cabling and the most popular of all twisted pair cables in use today. CAT5 cable contains four pairs of copper wire. CAT5 supports Fast (100 Mbps) Ethernet and comparable alternatives such as ATM. As with all other types of twisted pair EIA/TIA cabling, CAT5 cable runs are limited to a maximum recommended run rate of 100m (328 feet). Although CAT5 cable usually contains four pairs of copper wire, Fast Ethernet communications only utilize two pairs. A new specification for CAT5 cable, CAT5 enhanced (CAT5e), supports short-run Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mbps) networking by utilizing all four wire pairs and is backward-compatible with ordinary CAT5. Twisted pair cable like CAT5 comes in two main varieties, solid and stranded. Solid CAT5 cable supports longer runs and works best in fixed wiring configurations like office buildings. Stranded CAT5 cable, on the other hand, is more pliable and better suited for shorter-distance, movable cabling such as on-the-fly "patch" cabling.


They are not interchangeable in all circumstances. CAT5 is for 10/100 Ethernet and Cat6 can go all the way to 10Gig Ethernet over short distances. The specs are tighter for CAT6 than for CAT5 and the frequencies are higher and more complex.



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