Wasps and Hornets

These flying insects are considered pests to most because of their nasty stings.

Asked in Wasps and Hornets, First Aid

What to do when stung by bee on neck?

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use a credit card and try to slide it out. do not use tweezers or you'll push the venom into your blood. put some insect sting ointment on it and watch. if you think you're having an allergic reaction, go to the ER immediately or call 911
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

How do you get rid of bees that have a hive inside a wall?

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Getting rid of bees How to get rid of bee's? (and avoid harsh poisons). The hive was under the house. Bee's were entering through a small vent between bricks just above the ground level. I blocked up all other vents with plastic inserts sold for this purpose in a hardware store. The main vent was now my target. I got an ordinary plastic fluid funnel and cut off the spout about one inch in from the end - to make the hole slightly larger so that a bee could get through. '''Just one bee at a time.''' The funnel was then (this was at night when the bees were sleeping) fixed over the hole in the bricks and held in place with a complete packet of '''blu tak''' poster putty, placed around the rim of the funnel. So now the bee's had a smaller and single entry to their nest. In the afternoon's a '''traffic jam''' of bee's would build up. I'd spray them with fly spray and make a fast getaway. Unfortunate I know. (I'd called various bee keepers but none could or would help). Later I made a transparent flap -held in place with bluu tak, to make a sort of one-way exit and difficult entry point. It took a week of effort but eventually worked. When I removed the funnel it was choked-up with dead bee's inside. Also at night I squirted fly spray and cochroach spray into the slot on several nights. What additional effect this had was hard to know. I considered using a '''bug zapper''' as described above but these are a bit difficult to find. Anyway the above worked. Here are more tips from FAQ Farmers: If you know where the nest is and there are hundreds of bees, you can try something that worked for us. We put a bug zapper right in front of the "main entrance" of their nest while they were sleeping at night. We then turned it on during the day. As they flew in and out they died by the hundreds. After a few days I think they either moved to a safer location or we had killed them all. We had them in our ceiling and the noise they were making drove us crazy. My husband tapped on the ceiling with his knuckle and in one spot it put a hole in the ceiling. We saw the bees and put tape over it. I then got brave and put rubbing alcohol in a glass and slid the cup over the hole the started swarming down the cup and died. Got about 50. Then my husband sprayed the nest in the hole with Raid wasp &hornet killer. Next step is to get the nest out and hope there isn't more bees when we remove tape again. Been advised to put out a plate with sliced apples covered with honey. Theory: Bees will stick to honey - immobilized. Practice:did NOT work although the bees seem to have enjoyed their little buffet. Suggestion #2Bees hate mint. Spray their 'doorways' with Dr. Banner's mint soap (liquid) Don't know - haven't tried it yet. Hope it works as i do not want to kill, just relocate them Use a wet dri vac,Put at entrance turn it on and sucks them up fast and to make sure they are dead spray some bee killer in the hose to while its running.Kills them fast and easy to dispose of to. Please call a local bee keeper. Honeybees are essential for a lot of farm pollination. Because of the importation of the Varroa mite most feral bee hives are gone (in the wild). Spraying the bees with raid or another pesticide is just plain dumb. What IF you do kill them with spray? Now you have a wall full of decoposing bees and wax and honey the is soaked in poison. Some bee keepers (like me) will remove the bee for around $200. Call the Ag. extension office for a referal to a local bee keeper. They carry a list of local guys and girls willing to do the job. I am in a catch 22 situation. I have honey bees nesting in the wall of my house. No local bee keepers will tackle the problem. The pest control people tell me they'll deal with the bees, but I have to cut the hole into the house myself. I have no experience of dealing with angry bees, no protective clothing etc.. What do I do next? Do Not Just Kill or Remove ThemFirst, do not poison honey bees. If you do you will have a hard time finding help. The bees can not simply be killed or removed. You need to remove all of the comb. Bees work hard to keep the comb and honey cool. If you kill the bees, the combs will melt leaving you with honey running down your walls. First thing to do is find a local bee keeper. He/She may have to cut into the wall to get access to the bees. It is a messy job, and can cost some money, so be prepared. Here are a few ways to find a local bee keeper. Alot of bee keepers will leave their name with the local police, fire department, and exterminators.Most states have bee keeping clubs. You should be able to locate a nearby club online .Leave a posting on beesource.com click on the exchange button. It is a very friendly group of people.If you by chance are in the Minneapolis area, I would be happy to do it for you. you can leave me a message at bee source. My name on that site is Joshua2639
Asked in Geology, Wasps and Hornets, Civil Engineering

What is the Honeycomb rock?

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Honeycomb rock is limestone rock. Little pieces of rock landed on the surface and carved a little hole for itself then with wind and water the rock switched around making the hole even bigger.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

Can you die if a bumble bee stings you?

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If you are hyper-allergic to bee venom (and some people are) then a bumble bee sting can send your body into anaphylactic shock. It could kill you, if you don't get immediate treatment. If you have never been stung, your chances of being hyper-allergic are relatively small, but the chance is there. If you have been stung before with no severe reaction, your chances of developing anaphylaxis later on are vanishingly small, but still possible.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets, Herbivores

Are wasps carnivores?

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no coz they eat pollon from flowers
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

Can wasp spry kill a human?

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Ask the board of health num nuts
Asked in Wasps and Hornets, Synonyms and Antonyms, Pronouns

What is the opposite gender for bee?

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Answer Opposite of Bee is 'Drone' ---- Male bees are called drones; female bees are the queen and the workers.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

Does a wasp have a skeleton?

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no, they are an invertebrate, but its possible they have rigid or non rigid cellular structures giving them mass :D hope this helps Check out wikipedia for the definition of Invertebrate :)
Asked in Swimming Pools, Wasps and Hornets

What are the all yellow bees that swarm Arizona pools?

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Out in san diego, it has to do with nearbye ground covers. the only ground cover that provides little or reduced "bee action" is gardina and vinca, red apple is the worst, if that is within 200-300 yards of your pool= lots of bees!! My pool is in Arizona(Phoenix/west valley) and I've never had a problem with bees. Must be something in your area attracting them. They could be Arizona Honey Bees or Africanized Honey Bees. In the Mojave Desert where I live (Quartzsite-ish), they will gather around any place that has water available, like a dripping faucet or a swimming pool. 99% of all bees in Arizona are in fact Africanized Honey Bees. Don't be too alarmed. They are probably just getting moisture and returning it back to their hive. you want to just let them be...unless you notice that they have established a hive on your property. Details in the related links below.
Asked in Earth Sciences, Wasps and Hornets

Do wasps lose their stinger when they sting?

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No. This is only true of honeybees. Wasps do not lose their stingers and can sting multiple times.
Asked in Home Electricity, Wasps and Hornets

How do you keep bees out of your electrical box?

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Plug the small holes with duct seal or if knockouts are missing fill the holes with knockout fillers.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

Do bees return for their sting after stinging someone?

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No. European honeybees permenantly lose their stinger after stinging a victim, and the bee dies. The Africanized honeybee (the "killer bee") does not lose its stinger and can sting multiple times.
Asked in Swimming Pools, Wasps and Hornets

How do you keep sweat bees away from your pool?

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Because honey bees are are a social insect -- living in colonies of up to 60,000 individuals -- they need lots of food and water to keep the nest alive. The queen lays all the eggs in the colony and the worker bees do all the work. Worker bees normally forage on flowers for nectar and pollen. Nectar is the sweet flower sap that bees make into honey by evaporating off the excess water. Pollen is the protein resource bees feed their young larvae. Bees store their food and raise their young in the honeycomb nest. Honeycomb is made from beeswax, which is secreted by young worker bees, and fashioned into the familiar honeycomb hexagonal shape. Because bees live in these wax combs, though, they have to keep the nest at a constant temperature, not only to keep the colony from overheating, but also to prevent the wax from melting. In hot weather, bees cool the colony much like a swamp or evaporative cooler does -- by evaporating off drops of water. Bees collect water and spread it throughout the colony in droplets. Then they fan the air to creat an air stream over the water drops, causing the water to evaporate and thus lowering the nest temperatures. When bees forage for water, they are not too fussy about where they collect it. It could be from a small, muddy puddle, a stream, or your swimming pool, irrigation system, swamp cooler or birdbath. It is when bees come in contact with people, especially at swimming pools, that people notice them. Then they are considered not only a nuisance, but also a hazard. Here are some tips on how to keep bees away from your pools. When you first notice bees around your pool, mix a 1/4 cup of dish soap to a quart of water, and fill an empty sprayer bottle with it. Using the soapy mixture, spray any bees that are at your pool. This soapy mixture will kill the bees quickly and without harmful pesticide residues. Do this every time you see bees at a water source you want to keep bee-free. This will kill those foragers who are telling others in the colony where your swimming pool is located. Eventually, all those foragers who are not returning to the colony, will have died. Other foragers will find a different source of water, so do not worry that you are harming the colony. Your are only eliminating a few individuals. In addition, you should monitor other water sources and discourage bees from frequent visits. Here are some tips. Evaporative coolers: add a few ounces of pine-scented cleaner to the water. Mix 2 tablespoons of vinegar per gallon of water to birdbaths or pet waterers. Cover or drain pools or tubs when not in use. Repair leaky faucets and faulty irrigation systems. If you notice bees nosing around your shed, house or other small hole in your wall or foundation, these are probably scout bees looking for a new home site for a swarm. Make sure all holes larger than 1/4-inch in diameter (about the size of a pencil), is caulked up. I tried this remedy last summer and it worked. However, you have to be very diligent about it, and start well before it gets hot out. Prior to a children's birthday party I spent 3 hours patrolling the pool and killing bees. It worked, and by party time I had killed about 40 bees. At first you need to be outside full time, and when they finally dwindle, make a "pool patrol" every 10 or 15 minutes to be sure the bees aren't rediscovering your source. Also, if I missed killing a bee, it occasionally would come back and head straight for me. I only got stung once but you really need to be on your toes. My family thought I was nuts but it was worth it. We had hundreds of sweat bees in our pool. I have a perennial garden close to our pool and the sweat bees were attracted to the flowers. We changed the jets to create turbulence on the surface of the water. The sweat bees stopped landing in the pool almost completely - only a couple left that move along the surface of the water quickly to the filter. My kids hate these bees that come around and put me on a mission to fix it! Im new to pool ownership, so I went to every "pool school" available. I atttended a presentation by Bioguard Chemicals bioguard.com and found a neat little trick. They sell a pretty good product but they discovered that their Step 3 "Backup" for algae control addressed the bee issue. Simply, the product made for algae control was found to "release" the tension of the water top. When those critters come around they cant sit atop the water and drown. I was pulling bees out left and right. Eventually they didnt come around again. Try it, you'll be amazed plus you will be using a great product. It does have the tendency to create foam (especially if you have a waterfall), but they sell an additional product that kills the foam. The product is called Back Up and the company is Bioguard. Good luck. => or get a salt water pool, therfore less tension with less maitenance.> : :) why kill the bees? We are killing off the pollinators of the food supply. Without bees and other pollinators we wouldn't have many of the fruits and vegetables we enjoy. The bee population is declining at an alarming rate. To start with try placing some birdbaths in the yard or other shallow containers with some stones in them for the bees and butterflies to drink from. Even better are hummingbird feeders filled with sugar water placed a good distance from the pool. The bees will be drawn away from the pool. Once you get in the pool and start splashing around, the bees go away anyway. You can run the sprinkler system to shoo away the bees before you get in the pool. To keep the bees from drowning themselves i put a leaf catcher net over the pool when not in use. It keeps a lot of bugs and debris from clogging up the skimmer too. I have a saltwater pool and the bees are still attracted to it. But since i put out the hummingbird feeders, i have NO PROBLEMS with BEES or wasps. ANSWER You could try diverting the bees. Place a container of water away from the pool and drop a piece of peppermint candy in it. The candy attracts the bees. I've seen it work and there's no harm to the bees.
Asked in Math and Arithmetic, Wasps and Hornets, Intrigue and Unsolved Mysteries

How many sides and corners does a beehive have?

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The cells of a beehive are hexagonal and have 6 sides and 6 corners.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

Do Honey Bees have stingers?

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yes for protection
Asked in Wasps and Hornets, Centipedes, Caterpillars

What do inch worms eat?

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Inch worms are the larvae or caterpillars of the Geometridae family of moths, they eat leaves. The different species feed on different plants, mainly trees. Tips on taking care of an inchworm If you find an inchworm put it in a cup or glass jar. Put some leaves in the jar or cup from the tree or plant you found it from. Put a twig in the jar or cup to because when the inchworm makes it cocoon it needs to hang from something. Poke holes in the foil or cling wrap with a sharp pencil tip. (only use a pencil tip because inchworms are small and can climb out of the holes.) Put the inchworm in the jar or cup. Cover up the cup or jar with the foil or cling wrap with the poke holes. You can leave the jar or cup inside. If you feel that you think the inchworm needs to be outside put it underneath something safe. Somewhere that nothing can get to it, it won't be knocked over or get rained on. Check everyday on your inchworm. Change it's leaves when it's running out. if needed wash the jar or get a new cup. Remember... Inchworms poop too. When the Inchworm has become a moth. Release it into the same place it came from. Or close to where you got the inchworm before. HAVE FUN WATCHING YOUR INCHWORM. AS YOU CAN SEE FROM THIS EXPERIMENT YOU NEED TO HAVE LOTS OF RESPONABILTIES. YOU NEED TO TAKE CARE OF IT.
Asked in Car Batteries, Wasps and Hornets, Ants

Do ant stings contain acid?

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Yes they do, infact the acid in question is named after ants, it is called 'formic' acid (From Latin formca, ant.').
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

Do wasps or hornets have skeleton?

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Insects do not have bones, or what is called an endoskeleton. The hard shell, or exoskeleton, of an insect works the same as put skeleton.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets, Beetles, Black Holes

What insect looks like a beetle or hard shelled wasp bright red almost neon in color with a black stripe across its back?

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That's what I was wondering to. It most probably a red velvet ant- which is not an ant at all- it is actually a wingless wasp. Red velvet ants are predators, hunting other insects, especially bees, and infecting their victims bodies or nests with their parasitic eggs. They are a particularly aggressive species and can deliver a powerful and painful sting- this is how they got the nickname Cow Killer! Note that the female is wingless while the male has dark wings. They are not poisonous or deadly (unless you are allergic) so no worries. If you see them- turn around and walk the other way fast, they probably won't bother you if you leave them alone. if you have an infestation call an exterminator.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

What happens to wasps in cold weather?

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Wasps all die in the winter except for the queens who hibernate and re-emerge in the spring.
Asked in Wasps and Hornets

What is the use of Bee Hive shelf?

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to store bee hives.....

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