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Tuatara

Parent Category: Reptiles
Tuataras are reptiles from New Zealand. They resemble lizards, but are actually in a species of their own. They grow to be about 30" long, and they have a spiny ridge down their back.
Diet: Tuataras are carnivores (meat eaters). They eat insects (like the weta (acricket), moths and beetles), reptiles (like lizards), worms,snails, eggs, baby birds and even other Tuataras . Predators: Tuataras are eaten by rodents, pigs, and wild cats.
There are only two species of tuatara: The Northern tuatara  (Sphenodon guntheri) and the Brothers Island tuatara  (Sphenodon punctatus).
Tuataras have only two eyes.
no they dont but they are cold blooded
The longest recorded lifespan of a tuatara is about 80 years. Most  authorities think 100 years is possible but more than that seems to  be pure speculation. Reptiles in general can have longer life spans  than similarly sized mammals, and this is probably down to their  metabolisms' being much...
The tuatara's third eye is just a myth. Tuataras have only two eyes  in actuality.
Tuataras are camel-colored lizards with spines all down their  backs.
Tuataras live in small caves on islands near New Zealand. During the days of sailing ships, rats lived aboard sailing ships. The rats escaped from some of those ships and landed on some of those islands. They ate the tuataras on those islands. That reduced the number of islands with tuataras.
Tuatara are not lizards, but they do lay eggs. They are lizard-likereptiles which are endemic to New Zealand, but are not classifiedas lizards. Tuatara lay eggs in shallow burrows; the eggs take from15-18 months to incubate, and the hatchlings are able to fend forthemselves immediately.
bird, cats, rodents and porkers
The tuatara of New Zealand has three eyes but they do not all have vision capabilities. The third eye is called the parietal eye. Although it has a lens, retina and nerve connection, it is not functional as an eye. it grows on top of the reptile's head, under the skin, and is not visible....
The Tuatara's bite will cause serious injury and if you get too close they will bite.
  The now demonetised New Zealand 5 cent coin featured the "Tuatara", the last surviving member of an otherwise extinct family of reptiles indigenous to New Zealand.  
Tuatara are not lizards. They are lizard-like reptiles, endemic to  New Zealand, but they are not members of any lizard family.   Tuatara live in broad-leafed forest land and grasslands near  seabird colonies, where the birds have dug burrows. They shelter  under rocks, in rock crevices,...
  == Answer ==   The worst nightmare of the tuataras would be either consider themselves lucky/unlucky to have survived as the only species left in earth in order Ryncocephalia of class Reptilia or to have strucked to the country Newzeland at the time of separation of the continents due to...
No. Tuatara are carnivores. They feed on insects such as weta,beetles, spiders and larger prey such as lizards, smaller tuatara,birds' eggs and chicks, and even seabirds on occasion.
No, but its closley related and lived with them.
Becaues it is not a the same
No. Outside of zoos the tuatara can only be found in New Zealand.
it has cold blood and lays eggs
Either of two nocturnal lizard-like reptiles (Sphenodon punctatus or S. guntheri) that are found only on certain islands off New Zealand and are the only extant members of the Rhynchocephalia, an order that flourished during the Mesozoic Era. Also called sphenodon .
The kiore, or Polynesian rat, is one of the main predators of the  tuatara. Dogs and cats, along with other introduced species such as  stoats, are significant predators as well.
New Zealand* Added - The tuatara, also called the sphenodon, still lives in New Zealand.
yes i know it but lol
Like any wild animal, tuataras will fight back when cornered, threatened or provoked. They do have a nasty bite and will not let go easily. Approach them with caution.
The tuatara is a small lizard-like reptile of New Zealand. Adulttuatara are nocturnal (though tending more to diurnal during coldconditions), but young tuatara tend to be diurnal, as this helpsprotect them from the adult tuatara which are likely to prey on thejuveniles. Juveniles are also faster,...
Tuatara live in their natural refuges of Stephens Island and Brothers Islands in Cook Strait. Some have been transferred to the Coromandel, and Little Barrier. But the Little Barrier population were threatened by kiore, the native rat, and a small breeding population was rescued and established on...
Tuatara are native only to New Zealand, though there may be a few specimens in overseas zoos. They are nocturnal and slow moving. A friend of mine inspecting one in a glass case in an UK museum, was most impressed as to the realistic presentation they had achieved, and having not seen one in NZ,...
they are being saved becuase wild lidfe exploreres are saving them  and putting them in a natural habbitat where they are fed and kept  healthy.
25,951 are left
The tuatara (a lizard-like reptile native to New Zealand)  technically has three eyes. Two are ordinary functional eyes but  the third, or parietal eye, is under its skin and is not used for  vision. This is similar to the third eye called the pineal  gland found in mammals and humans. It is a...
Spikes are a protective feature that has evolved over time to save  them from predators.
The main differences between tuatara and lizards which excludetuatara from the lizard family are: Tuatara have a membranous third eyelid, which is not present inlizards. Lizards have external ears, but tuatara lack ears, and have no eardrum, ear holes or middle ear cavity. They do have primitive...
According to what I've read on people handling them, they can be  mean and bite but not always. According to Maori folklore, it can  be fiercely independent, a little arrogant or evasive, and has  problems with family members (Ngarara/Mango). But can also be seen  as a symbol of good luck, or...
Tuatara are both predator and prey. While adults have few natural predators, introduced predators such as dogs, stoats and ferrets have proven to be a threat to tuatara. The kiore (Polynesian rat) as well as two species of European rats steal the eggs and eat the hatchlings. Tuatara, in turn, are...
tuataras are predators
The Maori name of tuatara is translated as "peaks on the back".  This is because this New Zealand reptile, is characterized by  raised peaks along its back.
Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) are reptiles that look like lizards  but, often called living fossils, they are actually a different  type of reptile that dates back to prehistoric periods over 200  million years ago. They eat insects like crickets, moths, beetles,  and grasshoppers that they...
Because they have survived almost unchanged for 150 million years.
Tuatara are slow breeders, so if they did not have a long lifespan, they would have been unable to survive the arrival of European settlers, or possibly even the arrival of the Maori hundreds of years earlier. Polynesian rats and European rats were both introduced to the islands of New Zealand, and...
No. Tuatara are protected animals, and may not be kept as pets.
The Tuatara belongs to the broad reptile family, and in particular to the lizards branch. It diverged from its ancestral branch over 200 million years go, and has undergone change since that time. Thus it is incorrect to describe them as a "living dinosaur".
No. A tuatara is a simple reptile.
stopping its habitat being destroyed
  its population is estimated to be over 60,000
Yes, they are Meat eaters because they eat worms, flies, cicadas, caterpillars, geckos, slinks, small fish, raw liver and steak, mealworms, locusts and newborn mice
The tuatara, a highly endangered lizard of New Zealand, is a specialist. A specialist is a species which survives on a fairly limited diet or is restricted to a particular locality. The tuatara is a species found in only a few offshore islands of the New Zealand, and it is particularly vulnerable...
Hes 114 years old now
they can grow up to 235 cm long and 25 cm wide its Wight is 39.12
The true and full answers are not known. But obviously they survived the catastrophe at the Cretaceous/Tertiary extinction event. The Tuatara is only known from New Zealand, and though it is often referred to as a "living dinosaur" this is incorrect as it has changed from from ancestral types. ...
The main reason why tuatara are not classified as lizards are: * Tuatara have a membranous third eyelid, which is not present inlizards. * Lizards have external ears, but tuatara lack ears, and have noear drum, ear holes or middle ear cavity. They do have primitivemiddle ear bones, but the range of...
The conservation status of a species is an indicator of how likely it is to remain alive at present or in the near future. Tuatara has been categorised vulnerable because the IUCM believe tuatara's are likely to become endangered unless the circumstances threatening its survival and reproduction...
The ancestors of the Tuatara originated about 200 million years ago, as a sub-species of the broad dinosaur family, and probably arrived via land bridges which are long gone. The route is probably that used by other NZ fauna, such as Kiwi.
Yes, the tuatara which closely resemble lizards are of a different reptile family and are native to New Zealand. The tuatara have survived 200 million years and are fascinating to scientist considering the evolution of snakes and lizards. Tuatara is a word from the Maori language and means "peaks on...
Yes. Tuataras are endemic to New Zealand.
The tuatara is a kind of reptile of which there are only two  species, both found in New Zealand. Although the tuatara looks like  a lizard it is not. Rather, it is the last surviving member of the  order Rhynchocephalia.
The tuatara has been unable to survive on the New Zealand mainlandsince the advent of human settlement. Various factors havecontributed to their endangerment, and the offshore islands are theonly place where these factors are more limited - though not,unfortunately, completely absent. The main...
The tuatara is not the only reptile with a so-called pineal eye; most reptiles have one, and amphibians and fish do too. Light falls through and stimulates a part of the brain, making the animal active. If you cover the pineal eye, the animal will relax as if falling asleep. Mammals don´t have a...
Yes, tuataras have an extra parietal eye on the top of their heads, presumably to detect night and day cycles.
Yes. Tuatara are carnivores as they feed on insects such as weta,beetles, spiders and larger prey such as lizards, smaller tuatara,birds' eggs and chicks, and even seabirds on occasion.
A tuatara is not a lizard, and it cannot be purchased. Though lizard-like in appearance, this reptile is not classified as a lizard. Being endangered, and now extinct on the New Zealand mainland, it is not available to be purchased to satisfy one's whim to have an unusual or exotic pet.
Either of two nocturnal lizardlike reptiles (Sphenodon punctatus or S. guntheri) that are found only on certain islands off New Zealand and are the only extant members of the Rhynchocephalia, an order that flourished during the Mesozoic Era. Also called sphenodon.
in the wild maybe eggs and smaller animals
Tuatara are terrestrial reptiles, living on land. They lay theireggs in burrows, find their food on land and shelter on land.
IT can breathe fire- useful for hunting prey and warding off predators
The main reason why tuatara are endangered is because of the impactof human settlement and the introduction of non-native predators.The kiore (Polynesian rat) is responsible for the decreasingtuatara population, as are the two species of rats introduced byEuropeans. these rats steal the eggs from...
The tuatara is not a lizard. It is a lizard-like reptile, endemicto New Zealand, but it is not classified as a lizard. Tuatara are not limited to just males. Though extinct on themainland, it is estimated that there are around 100 000 tuatara onthe offshore islands around New Zealand. They continue...
No. The tuatara, a lizard-like reptile endemic to New Zealand, doesnot have the ability to produce any venom.
The tuatara is a lizard-like reptile of New Zealand. According tothe New Zealand Department of Conservation, there is just onesingle species of tuatara, but DNA testing indicates that this onespecies consists of three distinct variants. There is the northern tuatara ( Sphenodon punctatuspunctatus...
Because - just like the rest of the animal kingdom - they have their place in the 'great scheme' of life. They have every right to live on this planet - despite the unstoppable march of the human race, eating up vast tracts of the tuatara's natural habitat !
Not enough information is known to tell the exact quantity of food which Tuataras consume on a daily basis but we do know what they consume. It seems to be that they are mainly insectivores and thus they would eat a large quantity of these to satisfy the daily requirement of survival. They do...
Tuatara are very primitive lizards which can grow up to 2 feet or a bit longer. They live on small animals and insects. They mature sexually in about twenty years and the females lay eggs every 4 years. They are thought to have a lifespan of about 50 - 60 years in the wild. One example, in captivity...
there are 350 kinds of tuataras
There are actually two species of tuatara, both in the genus  Sphenodon: the Northern tuatara (Sphenodon guntheri) and the  Brothers Island tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus). These species  are the only members of the order Rhynchocephalia, one of the four  orders of reptiles. The other orders are...
Tuatara are not hunted. They are protected reptiles, native to NewZealand. Due to the prevalence of introduced species, they now onlyexist on a number of offshore islands of New Zealand.
It is made of keratin scales, as it is for other reptiles.
The tuatara is a reptile and, like all reptiles, it has scaly skin which is brown to olive green in colour. Along its neck and spine is a series of crests, or ridges.
They are an endemic species of New Zealand.
The main threats to the tuatara are introduced predators. The kiore(Polynesian rat) is responsible for the decreasing tuatarapopulation, as are the two species of rats introduced by Europeans,while cats, dogs, stoats and ferrets have also contributed to thetuatara's decline. On the mainland,...
The tuatara is a reptile confined to a few islands of the shores of New Zealand. it resembles most lizards, and is one of the remnants of the dinosaur age. Tuataras eat spiders, small birds and insectsThe Tuatara is a reptile that has lived longer than the dinosaurs.
It means "peaks on the back" in Maori.
No. Iguanas and tuatara are quite different species. Whilst bothiguanas and tuatara are reptiles, the iguana is a type of lizard,whereas the tuatara is not classified as a lizard.
Tuatara are lizard-like reptiles endemic to New Zealand. They are not Maori, as Maori refers to the race of people who inhabited New Zealand long before European settlement. However, the word 'tuatara' is a Maori word. It means 'peaks on the back', referring to the spiny protuberances.
Tuatara are reptiles and, although lizard-like in appearance, theyare not actually lizards. They are the . only surviving members of the unique reptile group known asSphenodontia, which are believed to have been around at the sametime as the dinosaurs. .