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Answered 2009-07-07 05:56:10

The force of friction is 32.65 N. The solution comes from first taking the sum of the forces in the normal. This yields the Normal force (N = Cos 32 degrees X Ff = Cos 32 X 110 N = 93.29 N) Next, we use the Normal force, plugging it into the accepted formula for Friction, Ff = u X N . This gives us: Ff = .35 X 93.29 N = 32.65 N.

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Is the coefficient of friction on a horizontal plane between to substances the same as the coefficient of friction on the incline plane?

POMBO


Can an object move backward on an inclined plane?

Yes, if the incline angle becomes great enough. > As the angle increases, the force on the object down the incline increases but the effective weight on the slope surface decreases. > When the object breaks away the angle of incline can be used to calculate the coefficient of friction between the two surfaces. > coefficient of friction = sine ( incline angle ) / cosine ( incline angle )


Is the magnitude of coefficient of friction dependant on the weight or the incline angle?

No. The coefficient of friction is the same (for a specific pair of surfaces); however, the weight or the angle of inclination must still be considered in the calculations.


When using the inclined plane what is the push or pull force?

This is basically a trigonometry problem and is totally dependent on the angle of the incline, the coefficient of friction between the surfaces, and the weight of the object. Once all that is known then you use Trigonometry to resolve the right triangle's Hypotenuse made by the Force Vectors found from its weight and SINE of the angle of the incline, and applying the coefficient of friction.


The coefficient of static friction along an inclined plane is equal to tan alpha. What about the coefficient of kinetic friction?

It's not. The coefficient of static friction is only equal to the tangent of the angle of incline at the maximum angle before the object begins to slide. At this point static friction equals the component of the weight along the incline (weight X sin alpha). Static friction is given by the coefficient of static friction times the normal force (weight X cos alpha) fs = us N = us mg cos(alpha) Wx =mg sin(alpha) fs = Wx us mg cos(alpha) = mg sin(alpha) us = [sin(alpha)] / [cos(alpha)] = tan(alpha) Similarly, the coefficient of kinetic friction equals the tangent of the angle of incline only if the object is sliding down the incline at constant velocity (net force equals zero). If the object is accelerating along the incline (make this the x axis): Fnet, x = Wx - f max = mg sin(alpha) - uk mg cos(alpha) uk = [g sin(alpha) - ax] / [g cos(alpha)]


How can an adjustable inclined plane be used to measure the coefficient of static friction and coefficient of static friction with a mass of 5.0?

Incline the plane until breakaway is achieved and note the angle. > A) Sin angle * 5 = force down (and parallel to) the slope in kgf. > B) Cos angle * 5 = force (weight) of block normal to slope surface. > Static friction coefficient = A / B


A block accelerates at 3.2 down a plane inclined at an angle 30 degrees. Acceleration of gravity is 9.8. Whats the coefficient of static friction between the block and the inclined plane?

Static friction does not apply when the block is already moving. Without friction, the force on the block parallel to the surface of the incline is Fg*sin(angle), so the acceleration without friction is 9.8* sin(30) = 9.8 * (1/2) = 4.9 Since it is accelerating at 3.2, friction is slowing down the block by (4.9-3.2 = 1.7). The coefficient of kinetic friction is (1.7/4.9) = 0.346939


How do you find the minimum coefficient of static friction for a mass on an incline of 32 degrees?

The equation for friction is F=uN. F (friction), u (coefficient of friction), and N (normal). So you first need to solve for the normal by using Newton's second law. Also solve for the x component of the gravity force. Since it is static friction, you know it should be at rest, so that x component force should be the same as the force of friction. Knowing that and the normal, plug it into the equation and solve for u.


Why does a toy car rolling at constant speed down a straight incline track slow down when reaching the base of the incline?

i think this happens due to friction between the ground and the toy car :)


A block is at rest on an incline The force of friction necessary to prevent the block from sliding increases when the incline angle is?

increased


Would friction or air pressure affect how fast a ball rolls down a incline?

Yes it would. Speed will depend on Weight of the ball, Incline angle, Friction, and air pressure.


Ways to decrease friction?

lubrication, use ice, put whatever it is on an incline to where weight and friction are balanced.


What causes speed to increase or decrease?

Presence of friction, incline and so on.


What is the difference between static and dynamic friction?

Static friction is the friction that acts between two objects which are not moving in relation to each other. For example, it is the force that prevents you a block from sliding down a ramp with a small incline. Dynamic friction is the friction that acts between two objects which are moving in relation to each other. For example, it is the force that makes pushing a heavy box across the floor difficult.


Do objects fall slower on an incline?

Yes, due to friction, but nothing else.


Experiment to find coefficient of static friction?

Experiments with Friction: Measuring Static Sliding Coefficient of Friction with a Rampby Ron Kurtus (revised 3 November 2005)The goal of this experiment is to measure the static sliding coefficient of friction between two surfaces by using a ramp and measuring its inclination.The idea is that if you put a solid object on a ramp and start to tilt the ramp upward, there is a point where the object will start to slide. That is the angle where the force of gravity is strong enough to overcome the static friction.By simply knowing the angle or the inclination, you can then calculate the static sliding coefficient of friction between the two materials. You can cover the ramp with various materials to determine different coefficients.MaterialsA flat board to be used as a rampOptional covering material for the rmapObjects to slide down the rampStepsPlace the ramp on the ground and put the object on the rampSlowly raise one end of the ramp until the object starts to slideMeasure the height (A) and length (B) of the inclination, as in the drawing belowCalculate the coefficient of friction between the surfaces: fr = A / BDifferent combinationsYou can use different combinations of materials to measure their coefficients of friction. For example, you can use a:Wooden board and a brick to calculate the kinetic coefficient of friction between wood and brick materialSheet of iron on the board and an iron block to slide down the rampSheet of iron with film of oil on it and an iron block to slide down the rampCovering of wet linoleum and a shoe to see how slippery a floor can beThere are many combinations that you can measure.ExplanationAlthough the equation to find the static coefficent of friction is very simple, the principles behind it require some knowledge of Mathematics.Physical science backgroundThe coefficient of friction between two surfaces is a number that determines how much force is required to move an object that is held back by friction when the two sufaces are pressed together.The friction equation is Fr = fr x N, where Fr is the resistive force of friction or the amount of force required to overcome friction, fr is the coefficient of friction between the two surfaces, and N is the normal or perpendicular force pushing the two surfaces together. If the force pushing to surfaces together is gravity, then N equals the weight of the upper object.Static and kinetic frictionFor a sliding object, the static coefficient of friction results in the force required to start the object moving. Once the object is sliding at a steady rate, the kinetic coefficient of friction results in the force required to keep the object moving at that velocity.Using rampA clever way to determine the static coefficient of friction is to start an object sliding down a ramp. The component of gravitational force that causes the object to just start moving is equal to the resistive force to keep the object stationary. That is the static force of friction.Note that you must record what the two surfaces are. The coefficient of friction is always for two surfaces. For example, you could find the friction between wood and steel, wood on wood, rubber on wet pavement, and so on.Knowing the force required to overcome the friction and the force pushing the object onto the ramp, will allow you to determine the static coefficient of friction.MathematicsThe coefficient of friction is calculated using trigonometry. Consider the triangle in the drawing below.C is the length of your ramp, which is inclined at an angle a and is at a height of A. The length of the sides of the triangle are A, B, and C. The relationship between the sides are the trigonometric functions sine of angle a, which is abbreviated sin(a), cosine of a or cos(a) and tangent of a or tan(a).Since sin(a) = A / C and cos(a) = B / C, then sin(a) / cos(a) = tan(a).Components of gravityWhen an object that weighs W is on a ramp, the force of gravity can be divided into components in perpendicular directions.Normal force componentThe force pushing the object against the surface of the ramp is reduced because of the incline. The normal force N = W x cos(a), as show in the picture below. In the case where there is no incline, a = 0 degrees and N = W.Component down the rampThe component of gravity is pulling the object along the ramp is F = W x sin(a).Object starts to moveNow when the angle a become steep enough, the object starts to move and F = Fr, which is the force of static friction required to start the object moving.But you know that Fr = fr x N.And for the object on the ramp, N = W x cos(a).Thus W x sin(a) = fr x W x cos(a).Using a little Algebra, we get fr = sin(a) / cos(a) or fr = tan(a).Finally, since tan(a) = A / B, we have fr = A / B.So, all you need to know is the angle the object starts to slide or the lengths of its sides, and you can easily determine the coefficient of friction between the two surfaces.Experiments with Friction:Measuring the Coefficient of Friction Using a Scale by Ron Kurtus (26 January 2001)Friction is a resistive force caused when two objects are in contact with each other. There are some simple experiments to determine the force of friction and the coefficient of friction.The coefficient of friction is a number that determines how much force is required to move an object that is held back by friction.BackgroundThe equation for this is Fr = fr x N, where Fr is the resistive force of friction or the amount of force required to overcome friction, fr is the coefficient of friction between the two surfaces, and N is the normal or perpendicular force pushing the two surfaces together. If the force pushing to surfaces together is gravity, then N equals the weight of the upper object.Static and kineticFor a sliding object, the static coefficient of friction results in the force required to start the object moving. Once the object is sliding at a steady rate, the kinetic coefficient of friction results in the force required to keep the object moving at that velocity.Two surfacesNote that you must record what the two surfaces are. The coefficient of friction is always for two surfaces. For example, you could find the friction between wood and steel, wood on wood, rubber on wet pavement, and so on.MethodOne way to determine the coefficient of friction between two surfaces is to pull on an object, using a spring scale that is used to measure weight. If you lay an object on another surface and then pull it, you can determine the amount of force required to move the object.The coefficient is then fr = Fr / W, where W is the weight of the upper object.First you pull slowly until the object just starts to move. Record the force and calculate the static coefficient of friction.Then drag the object along at a steady velocity. Record the force on the scale and calculate the kinetic coefficient of friction.


How high above the horizontal surface does the mass reach on the incline before it stops in meters?

The answer depends on:whether there was only an initial force projecting the mass (a projectile) or if the force continued (as in a self-propelled car).in the second case, do the calculations need to account for a reduction in the mass of fuel, and so of the car, as it travels,the angle of inclination of the inclinewhether or not friction is to be taken into account and, if so, the coefficient of frinction between the mass and the inclined plane.


Why are flyovers built at an incline?

flyovers are bulit at an incline because, firstly to avoid traffic. secondly it eases the vehicles to move easily . if the incline is more there will be more friction and vehicles cant go up easily


What is the relationship between an inclined plane and force?

mass of object * sin incline angle = force down slope parrallel to incline from cog mass of object * cos incline angle = force normal to incline surface from cog


A 21.2 kg child descends a slide 3.5 m high and reaches the bottom with a speed?

The answer depends on the incline (slope) of the slide. And, if you want a more realistic answer, a measure of the friction between the child and the slide.


Neglecting air resistance and friction if a large block of ice and a small block of ice start sliding down an incline together the heavier block will get to the bottom of the incline when?

At the same time as the other peice of ice.


What is the relationship between the slope of the inclined plane and the force required to pull an object up?

(ignoring friction) > Mass of the object * sine (incline angle) = force down, and parallel to, the slope (kilograms force) This ratio ( force / mass) remains constant regardless of the objects mass, as long as the incline angle remains the same.


What is the relationship between the angle of incline and mechanical advantage?

hj


How the height affect the incline plane?

The higher the incline plane, the greater the angle made between the plane and the horizontal. So the plane will be steeper.


Does weight affect the speed of an object?

No. What an object weighs (which is the effect of gravity on the object's mass) does not affect it's speed whether it's free falling or on an incline. On Earth which has an atmosphere, drag has an effect on the speed of the object. If you have two free falling objects of different weights, but they have the same frontal cross-sectional size and shape, the heavier one will accelerate faster. On an incline and rolling, you have other factors. Friction with the ground, friction between the moving parts, etc.