Judaism
History of Judaism

According to Jewish tradition were the Jews always monotheistic?

012

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2018-02-10 18:59:35
2018-02-10 18:59:35

Yes.

Dictionaries define "Judaism" as The monotheistic religion of the Jews, since the founding principle of Judaism was and is the belief in One God, creator of the universe. This was the teaching which was spread by Abraham, and has continued since then. From Judaism, belief in One God has spread through the Western world.

Jews have always worshiped the One God. Abraham worshiped "the Lord God of Heaven and Earth" (Genesis 14:22 and 24:3) and complained about the Philistines' lack of fear of God (Genesis 20:11).

Jacob confiscated the idolatrous images taken from Shechem (Genesis 35:2) and got rid of them (Genesis 35:4); and refrained from invoking the gods of Nahor (Genesis 31:53). Rachel pilfered Laban's statue-images (Genesis 31:19) in order to prevent him from idolatry (Rashi commentary, ibid.). Joseph placed his hope in the God of the Forefathers (Genesis 50:24).

At the time of the Exodus, God wrecked the Egyptian idols (Exodus 12:12) and warned against idolatry (Exodus 22:19). Later, Moses characterized the Golden Calf as "a great sin" (Exodus 32:21, 30) and punished the worshipers (Exodus ch.32). During the rest of his lifetime and that of Joshua (Judges 2:7), no incidents of Israelite idolatry were reported.

Shortly before he died, Moses warned the people that he suspected that they would eventually succumb to the lure of the idols (Deuteronomy 29:17). Joshua gave a similar warning (Joshua ch.24).

These warnings came true. Many of the Israelites went astray after the foreign gods (Judges 2:11). However, they never invented their own idol. It was always the baneful influence of other peoples. And there were times when the entire Israelite nation repented (Judges 2:1-4) and prayed to God (Judges 3:9, 3:15, 6:6, 10:10).

Those who did sin did not represent or influence normative Judaism, just as the later Sadducees and Essenes did not. They were deviating from the Torah's standard; they were publicly, repeatedly, and scathingly excoriated by the prophets, and they caused God's retribution to come upon the entire people (2 Kings ch.17).

Because of the idol-worship that did happen, ancient images of idols have been found in Israel too. Images of God aren't found because it is forbidden to represent Him through imagery (Deuteronomy 4:15-16).

It should be noted that idolatry was never universalamong the Israelites. The belief in One God was continued in every generation, whether by the few or the many; and it is those who handed down that tradition whose beliefs we Jews continue today. Deborah ascribed victory to God (Judges 4:14), Gideon tore down the idolatrous altar (Judges 6:25-27); Samson prayed to God (Judges 16:28), as did Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11) and Samuel (ibid. 12:18); Eli blessed in the name of God (1 Samuel 2:20), Saul built an altar to God (1 Samuel 14:35); Jonathan ascribed victory to God (1 Samuel 14:12), as did David (1 Samuel 17:46); and Solomon built the Temple for God (1 Kings 8:20). A number of the kings "did what was right in God's eyes": David (1 Kings 15:5), Solomon (see 1 Kings 3:3), Asa (1 Kings 15:11), Yehoshaphat (1 Kings 22:43), Yehu (2 Kings 10:30), Yehoash (2 Kings 12:3), Amatziah (2 Kings 14:3), Azariah (2 Kings 15:3), Yotam (2 Kings 15:34), Hizkiah (2 Kings 18:3), and Josiah (2 Kings 22:2). Part of this righteousness was their destroying whatever idolatrous incursions had occurred among the populace (1 Samuel 7:3-4, 2 Chronicles 15:8, 2 Chronicles 17:6, 2 Kings 18:4). Even at the height of the unfortunate spread of idolatry among the less-loyal Ten Tribes, there were thousands who remained loyal to God (1 Kings 19:18).

And, of course, the Prophets, who spoke in the name of God and warned against idolatry: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Hosea and so on.

The later sages of the Talmud, who ridiculed idolatry (Megillah 25b), were simply continuing in the tradition of the Prophets whose verses are quoted in that context (ibid.).

More information:

While no excuse should be made for those Israelites who strayed, the following may at least clarify the topic a little.

1) The ancients were tested by a powerful lure towards idolatry. We don't understand it because conditions have changed (Talmud, Yoma 69b).

2) Most Israelites (if not all) who committed idolatry didn't completely forget about their One God. They introduced idols into the picture.

3) It was thought that each nation has its own god. They thought that they needed to propitiate the gods of the nations around them so that those gods "wouldn't give military victory" to those nations over the land of Israel.

4) They figured that they would acknowledge other gods "just in case," and that it would be no worse than someone today who carries a "lucky" penny or rabbit's foot.

001
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
User Avatar

User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2015-03-05 19:34:22
2015-03-05 19:34:22

From the time of Abraham, yes. Abraham worshiped "the Lord God of Heaven and Earth" (Genesis 14:22 and 24:3) and complained about the Philistines' lack of fear of God (Genesis 20:11).

Jacob confiscated the idolatrous images taken from Shechem (Genesis 35:2) and got rid of them (Genesis 35:4); and refrained from invoking the gods of Nahor (Genesis 31:53). Rachel pilfered Laban's statue-images (Genesis 31:19) in order to prevent him from idolatry (Rashi commentary, ibid.). Joseph placed his hope in the God of the Forefathers (Genesis 50:24).
At the time of the Exodus, God wrecked the Egyptian idols (Exodus 12:12) and warned against idolatry (Exodus 22:19). Later, Moses characterized the Golden Calf as "a great sin" (Exodus 32:21, 30) and punished the worshipers (Exodus ch.32). During the rest of his lifetime and that of Joshua (Judges 2:7), no incidents of Israelite idolatry were reported.

Later, there were times when some (or many) of the Israelites went astray after foreign gods (Judges ch.2), but that is not Judaism - it's the abandonment of Judaism. Those who did sin did not represent or influence normative Judaism, just as the later Sadducees and Essenes did not. They were deviating from the Torah's standard, and they were publicly, repeatedly, and scathingly excoriated by the prophets.

See also the other Related Links.

Link: Reliability of the Hebrew Bible

Link: What do Jews believe God is like?

001
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


Jews are monotheistic and happy


According to Jewish religious tradition, Jewish men should cover their head while awake as a physical recognition that HaShem is always above us. Men, who don't wear a head covering all the time, will usually put on a kippah when entering a synagogue and/or when they pray in following with this tradition.


yes Hinduism was monotheistic, and it has always been and always will be. The core of Hinduism suggests that all beings are created from Lord Brahma himself. Thus Hinduism is monotheistic.


Wearing a kippah is not a religious commandment, it is a 'minhag'. A minhag is a tradition that has the same imperative as religious law in Judaism. The meaning behind this Jewish tradition is a physical recognition that HaShem (The Creator) is always above us.


Christianity was and will always be monotheistic. The trinity represents God in three parts as One: The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.


Goldston can be a Jewish name, but is not always a Jewish name.


This is a talmudic excert most probably- or something o the kind. There are lots of tales and proverbs like that in Jewish tradition and the symbols and the sence and spirit of the Isaak's story correspond to Jewish tradition very much. Though I am not sure Bergman could just invent the story - nevertheless it does not matter Talmud and othe Jewish wirtten and oral sources are so vast that you can always find something of the kind.


Ringold has always been Jewish.


It does not say this in any religion that I am aware. Man always has a fundamental flaw, even before a fall or descent, such as gullibility or innocence. Furthermore, in the Monotheistic tradition, man is made of dust and is therefore as imperfect as the elements that constitute him.


No Jews have always had one God, Judaism is a monotheistic religion and always has been.


Yes. However, having a "Jewish name" does not always mean you are Jewish.


Yes, they can, since it's considered respectful - Jewish tradition always insists on the groom breaking the wine glass, no matter what. __________ Intermarriage is not allowed according to Jewish law. As a result, the majority of Rabbis will not perform this kind of marriage. Some Reform Rabbis will participate in a marriage ceremony where one of the couple is not Jewish. If you are asking if a group ceremony where the couples are of different religions, it would have to be a civil wedding ceremony.


Yes, her beau Jake G is always jewish.


Jewish tradition states that the words of Solomon (and the rest of the Tanakh) were Divinely inspired. They contain wisdom and prophecy which are always relevant (see Talmud, Megillah 14a).


someone in a blog said she was jewish, also i always got a jewish vibe from her


Elohim (אלוקים) is the Hebrew word for God. According to Jewish belief, God has always existed, and was never born.


No one, according to Muslim, Christian, and Jewish beliefs God has always been and always will be no one created God he has just been around since before time.


Zionism. There was always a Jewish presence in palestine.


According to traditional Christian/Jewish/Muslim mythology he always existed and he couldn't create himself because he always was. According to other mythologies he just "popped" into existance. The real answer is if God exists at all then nobody knows how he came about.


That's because I don't know his Jewish name. He's always a 'Bud' to me.


Since both Hebrews and non-Hebrews lived in Mesopotamia, there may have been some borrowing in minor matters. But in terms of fundamental beliefs, the two are quite different. Judaism, according to tradition, has always been monotheistic. Other Mesopotamians, however, believed in a number of deities.


Jewish tradition states that we have free will (Deuteronomy 30:15-20). It is always limited by circumstances, and there are many instances in which God imposes His will, but nonetheless each of us does possess his or her measure of free will and freedom to act.


Jewish people only have one God. And the Jewish view is that God is always present everywhere, not just at weddings.


They don't have to, it's just tradition.




Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.