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2011-05-21 01:10:39
2011-05-21 01:10:39

No. MOST of them are. The most popular "22" in the world is the .22 Long rifle cartridge, which IS a rimfire- as is the .22 Short, .22 Long, .22 Extra Long (obsolete), .22 WRF, and the .22 WMR. HOWEVER- there HAVE been .22 centerfire cartridges, such as the .220 Swift, 22-250, and a European cartridge, the .22 Velo Dog. .22 caliber means that the bullet is 22/100ths of an inch in diameter. None of the centerfire rounds will interchange with the .22 LR.

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