Firearms

Values are based on the actual condition of the firearm and whether any modifications have been done to it, such as re-bluing or drilling and tapping for scope mounts, etc. Condition depends on how much of the original finish (stock and metal) is remaining and if there are any dings, dents, scratches, etc on it. It's really best to take the firearm to someone local or to a gun show for an estimate of worth.

47,492 Questions
Firearms
Shotguns
Browning Firearms

What is the value of a Browning Sweet Sixteen?

This is a very popular question. The reader should know a few things about Sweet Sixteens to identify their own Sweet 16 to determine value.

American Shooters have had a love affair with The Sweet Sixteen since it's introduction to the public in 1937. A Sweet Sixteen is the Lightweight Version of the Browning 16 guage Auto-5 Shotgun. Not all 16 guage Automatics are Sweet 16's; There is a Standard weight that was imported by Browning and stayed in the Auto-5 line from 1923 until 1964. The Sweet 16 was made in Belgium from 1936 until 1976. Sweet 16's were discontinued when Auto-5 Production moved to Japan in 1976. Browning reintroduced the Sweet Sixteen (Japanese production) in 1987 and was produced until 1992.

"How to tell if you have a Standard or a Sweet 16." All Sweets will be marked "Sweet Sixteen" on the left side of the receiver from 1949 and on. Prior to 1949, the easiest way to tell is that a Sweet 16 has a gold trigger and the barrel has three holes drilled through the barrel band; Standard 16's do not have these features. (If you have a Standard 16 ga and not a Sweet, keep reading)

Value will depend on which model of Sweet (Belgian or Japan) Condition, Originality, and age. "How do I know if I have a Belgian or Japanese Sweet 16?" The markings on the Barrel will identify place of manufacture, but if a barrel has been replaced, the serial number and code (on the bottom of the receiver) will help identify. You can ask for the age on WikiAnswers or go the Browning Web site to date your gun.

Pre-war Auto-5 Sweet 16's are very collectable in original condition. Recoil Pads and Poly Chokes will hurt the value of any Sweet 16. Guns made up until 1952 have the front trigger safety, and are not too popular as shooters. Most users want the cross bolt safety, therefore the earlier guns in less than 80-90% condition do not command the same prices as later Sweets.

All Sweets had round knobs until 1967 as standard. 1967 to 1976 had the flat or "square knobs". Many buyers are split on preferring the round knob or flat knobs. They both seem to sell equally as well.

So now if you have identified your Sweet, lets look at Condition. Up to about 95% of original finish, these guns should sell well based on the scale of the Blue Book of Gun Values. Above 95%, they really have been selling for premium prices the last several years. These prices for Belgian mint and near new guns have sold for double what the book value has been. Used Japanese guns are usually lower in value, but the mint Japanese guns match up to the Belgians in price.

So how much are we talking?

Older pre 50's guns in 80-95% would be appraised between $350-$700

Sweets from the 1950's - 1976 up to 95% typically between $450 to $900

Any Sweet that is near new (98% or better) to mint in the Box can command $1500+ in the right market. Some have sold as high as $2500, but this is for exceptional mint guns. A vent rib may help the price on an older model over 95% condition, but most of the 60's and 70's guns have vented ribs. It doesn't make that much difference in the sellers price.

So where does a Standard Weight 16 fit in? It's pretty close to actual Blue Book numbers, but the real mint guns drop off from reaching as high as the Sweet Sixteens. A 1960 mint in the box Standard might sell from $1200-$1500 while a MIB 1960 Sweet will sell for $500 or more - than the Standard.

Keep in mind that there are a lot of Sweets on the market, and whether you set the price or a Gun Shop appraises it for you, when it comes time to sell, it may take a while, especially for guns well used.

For more information on Sweet Sixteens, use the link below for Rare Sweet 16's.

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Firearms
Child Development

Why do children like eating poop?

I would disagree with that being a trend. Although they get into some things they shouldn't, the taste would certainly curtail the behavior unless you are around some unusual kids.

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Firearms
Shotguns
Baikal Firearms

What information is available on Baikal shotguns?

I have had good luck with the newer O/U models. From what I have read, the O/U Browning knock-off is one of the hottest selling shotguns going right now. I've looked for one of the S/S models but have not been able to find one -- in most cases dealers are sold out. Check out European American Armory, Corp. at www.eaacorp.com.

You can go to Baikal's website at www.baikalinc.ru. Be sure to click English version when the page pops up unless you can read Russian! Has lots of information and you can even contact the company via email.

Baikal shotguns have been around in the UK for a long time now. They are very simple and honest hardworking guns that will give many years of service. I own two Baikal shotguns (both singles) and I often choose them instead of my Beretta 391 semiauto. Prices in the UK for new baikal guns are about:

single all gauges �89

side by side �260

over/under �340

You can choose to have fixed or multichokes.

I recently purchased a Baikal 12 g. SXS with the 28 inch barrel. I have used it about 4 times shooting clays at the farm. My first impression was that it was LOUD. Since I use ear protection, this was really not a problem. Second thing: it kicks pretty well. Even though it had a kick pad already, I just bought a slip-on one at Wal-Mart. Initially, I felt that the gun was a little stiff, it didn't break open easily. Since I have used and cleaned it now about four times, it is loosening up nicely. I can hit with it. I do plan to change the sights. The ones on it are too small. For the money, I am thrilled with the result.

I looked long and hard for an O/U IZH-27 in 16 guage and finally was able to purchase one. I have run about 7 boxes throught it now and really do like it. It shoots really well and I can connect pretty good with it. It was really stiff at first but has now limbered up quite well. I would certainly recommend these guns for the price.

I recently purchased a Baikal IZH43KH Bounty Hunter 2 SXS 12g. with a 20 in. barrel. First impressions is very tight to open it up, but getting broke in better. Very noisy to shoot also, will need ear protection if target practicing or shooting for long periods. Also needs a better kick plate, will bruise your shoulder after awhile of shooting even with light load ammo. Would recommend this gun to anyone however, very fun to shoot.

I have had a model 27 O/U for ten years now. I just got home from trap shooting,some calculations with my buddies and we figure 10,000 rounds through it. It had to go in once for a minor repair.Less than 100 dollars. I located the parts on the net easily. It has chrome moly barrels so I can use steel shot in it. Truly a fun and reliable shotgun.

Purchased a 20ga. Baikal SxS with 26 in. Barrels, single selective triggers, choke tubes. Love it. For $330.00.

I recently purchased a Baikal 12 ga SxS with selectable trigger, screw in chokes and the ejector option. I paid $335.00, and it is one heckuva nice gun. I own a Beretta semi-auto, as well as a Browning Belgian A5 light twelve, and can't think of a better value than the Baikal. I'm thinking about picking up a 20 ga too!

Baikal shotguns Have been described perfectly in all the previous answers they are a great low investment utilitarian shotgun, that you won't be afraid to use. It will not gain any value except sentimental. memories afield or that first 25 straight.

I am not a gun collector and my eyes do not glaze over at gun shows ( which I rarely frequent) I have been an avid hunter since I was ten years of age. I am now 63. I do appreciate a good firearm. My criteria is both functional and aesthetic. I know guns. Like many of you who live on limited salary, it is difficult to cough up the shekels for a high quality gun. People, I am convinced Baikals are junk. Period. I too am occasionally deluded into thinking that I might find a gun which is high quality for a low price. I bought a Baikal o/u. It was so stiff upon opening the action that you practically had to break it over your knee. The seller at Sheels assured me that it would loosen up with use. It never did. The lock was extremely poorly designed and was wedge shaped keep the action tight. It would jam in so tight that I had to take my gloves off to exert enough pressure to open the gun. The safety quit working within three weeks. I tell you people that the lock designs and machining of the two Baikals I have owned would never be considered or tolerated by a gunmaker who had an inkling. Fooled once, your fault; fooled twice, my fault. I was stupid enough to try another Baikal. I know good design and craftsmanship and something in my gut kept saying - "there is no free lunch" but, not wanting to spend what it takes to buy surefire quality, I suckered again. As I have aged my hands really freeze up if I don't wear good insulated gloves. I have always hunted with a pump 870 but can't get insulated gloves into the trigger guard or feel the safety very well. I have always thought a nice side by side would be fun. Big trigger guard and thumb safety. So I bought a Baikal. This action is better designed in that the lock is smoother and not "wedge designed". The first thing I noticed is that it is really loud and kicks more than it should. The varnish ( or whatever the wood was finished with) wore off down the wood on the grip in one season. I only used it for hunting so I could live with that. The action problem is that the second barrel often does not go off. I hunt a lot of pheasants over a pair of German shorthairs and often get a chance at doubles. This is particularly disturbing. Pick any one of a thousand Brownings, Rugers or Weatherbys and they will function flawlessly. It really irks me that the sales people will lie through their teeth when you ask them if people have problems with them - that is when you buy a Baikal. However, when you trade them in they will admit that the complaint rate is high. I implore you not to be sucked in by trying to get quality for cheap. Ain' no such thing. Look closely at the machining - see the grinder marks etc. What do you think it looks like on the inside of the action. A good double is polished where it needs to function flawlessly. You might think that you're getting a Browning knock off, but Baikal does not possess the structural integrity that the Japanese knock offs do. Also, you won't by a super cheap Japanese knockoff. The problem is this. A Baikal has that first impression eye appeal and I suckered for it. Closer examination is another thing. I now hunt with a Browning.

I have owned a Baikal side by side in 12 gauge and successfully hunted ducks for 25 years and because I have to use steel shot now I will have to change to a pump or auto loader. My Baikal never malfunctioned during the quarter century of use. I abused it and used it for things that it was not made for such as disciplining the dog, paddling the boat after the paddle was stolen, I dropped it in the water and shot with it straight away and it never let me down. Other types have laughed at it but hey I am happy with it and it works for me.

SOME ADVICE FROM ONE WHO LEARNED THE HARD WAY: Based on owning two low cost Baikal double shotguns and follow up research at gun shops and on the net.

PREMISE; BUYER BEWARE WHEN BUYING A LOW COST SIDE BY SIDE OR OVER/UNDER SHOTGUN.Double guns are spendy compared to other type action shotguns. True?The reason is that a double requires more labor and the parts are more sophisticated to produce - especially for a single selective/automatic ejector double. Anything less than perfect will give problems galore.

In recent years the cost of high quality double guns has gone through the roof.Yet, Mr. Joe average hunter who lives modestly on a working man's wage would sure like to own a double. The demand is there if the price is right.

In the wake of this, some foreign gunmakers and U.S. companies have teamed up to fill the need. Remington imports Baikal doubles under the Spartan name, Mossberg imports cheap Turkish doubles and so on.

I have a problem called Raynaud's Syndrome. It is the frosty finger phenomenon.If I get my hands cold, they lose circulation - a potentially dangerous situation. As it progressed I could no longer get my heavily gloved finger in the trigger guard of my shotguns. A double has a large guard and a thumb safety so that was the perfect solution. Besides, a good double is a beautiful thing to shoot and behold.

So, having no idea about the state of the contemporary double gun as to cost, quality source etc., I went looking. I was bowled over by the cost of doubles - even the cheap ones. I finally settled on a twenty gauge Baikal O/U. It seemed extremely stiff but the salesman assured me it would loosen up with use. Wrong! It never did. A few weeks later the safety quit working.

I took it back under warranty and the salesman acted like I was the problem rather than the gun. He finally agreed to refund my money. I thought this was probably a fluke lemon. I then purchased a Baikal side by side. With field loads, it just sucked air on the second barrel. The finish wore off down to the wood in one season. I sent it in and had it fixed but haven't tried it out yet. They replaced a sear lifter.

So, I began to research and read all of the information I could find on the cheap imported doubles.Here is what I found. I talked with gun salesmen and gunsmiths as well as reading many testimonies on gun forums on the net. Even gun magazines are not reporting the facts because - guess how they make their money.

The hype on the web forums: This revealed the buyers psychology rather than standing up to the cold facts and objective research. When you talk to a guy who has recently purchased a car they always tell you how great a deal they got and how great the car is - right. Every time. The guys on the web sites sang the same song. Great workhorse guns - even drive a truck over them. Great entry level ( whatever that means ) guns. Read those reports and then carefully read between the lines. Reports like, "My Baikal really is great - although it is really hard to open when it gets hot when I shoot trap. Or, my Baikal is worth every dollar. I do have one little problem - the solder on the rib gave way. Give me a break. I really like my Mossberg Wal-mart o/u but the firing pin broke. Give me a break! Here is the psychology as I see it.

1. Like me, guys are in love with the idea of getting a good solid affordable double.

2. They go looking. They can't afford the spendy quality guns. Like a fly to the web, they are drawn to a cheap double. The cosmetics are often fairly attractive and the assumption is that the function, metal quality, internal fits, parts and finishes will be good also. Most of us would not know a well designed action from a poorly designed action and, since we probably have had good luck with guns in general, we naively trust that these guns are made with integrity.

3. They buy the gun, then justify the purchase come hell or high water. Objectivity flies out the window and personal bias takes control of their better judgment.

Gunsmiths opinions. All of the gunsmiths I interviewed gave the same opinions and reactions.

When I asked them about the low priced doubles, they expressed pure unadulterated disgust. The following are common complaints.

1. Soft metal on parts, pins, screws - therefore wear, scarring, burring were common with very little use.

2.Lack of uniformity of parts. (One guy on the web said he had seen more than one Baikal that couldn't even be assembled out of the box.)

3. Functional problems with aspects of action. Safety problems, opening and closing problems, selective trigger problems, doubling problems.

4. Solder problems.

5. Wood finish problems

6. Inferior bluing.

These are objective opinions and not based on fanciful speculation. One dealer told me that, out of 50 cheap Turkish doubles that came through, 47 had problems.Another told me that they had quit stocking Baikal because of such a high return and problem rate. Same with Cheap Turkish doubles.

Personal opinion: You get what you pay for. A gun simply MUST function dependably. If not, somebody might get killed. At the least, if you carry an undependable gun, you will be nervous and anxious all the time.

I'm the guy with the side by side Baikal. Sent it to Florida at Christmas time to be fixed. After a month and a half no word from them. Wrote a letter of inquiry a couple of weeks ago asking to be appraised of the situation. So far no response. Tell you anything?

Not sure what the questioner is actually asking; but I'll toss my hat into the ring anyway. I bought a IZH27 and could not be happier. Yes, you get what you pay for...and you also must understand what you are getting. What you get is a tool. It is rough but functional. For the price you pay, you can beat the heck out of it and not give it a second thought. It shoots and it shoots straight and well...as good as any other gun out there. Over 1000 rounds in several months and not one hiccup. The wood on my gun has a good fit and has an unbelievable tiger stripe pattern. A little stiff to break when new, but after 250 rds, this had eased considerably and gets better with each use. Automatic safety works every time, selectable barrel (trigger operated) flawless, selectable ejectors easy to use and tosses the empties a good 10 feet. I'd recommend one to anyone.

ANSWER :

I HAVE A OLDER MODEL PUMP ACTION BAIKAL 3.5" AND FOR SOME REASON THE BACK OF THE RECEIVER IS CRACKED FROM THE BOLT SLAMMING INTO IT !

IT LOOKS LIKE IT FIRED WITH OUT THE BOLT BEING LOCKED , NEVER COULD DUPLICATE IT AGAIN! BOUGHT 2 OF THESE ABOUT 12 YEARS AGO AND THE OTHER ONE IS DOING FINE!

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Firearms

How can you find out if a firearm is stolen?

In the US
  • Call your local police/sheriff and ask them to check it for you. They will need the serial number, manufacturer, model, and caliber. This is important, since the same number may have been used by different manufacturers. Some manufacturers may have used the same number ranges for different product lines.

    If you are unsure what kind of gun it is, check with a gunsmith or a gun dealer. Do not rely on the police to figure that out; they are law enforcement professionals, not firearms experts.

    If the gun has no serial number - due to being produced before this was required - but is unique in some way, police may still have it listed as stolen property, but it's a long shot.

  • The NCIC (National Crime Information Center) database contains, among other things, information on stolen firearms but it is only accessible by law enforcement. This is likely what the local police will check, along with their own lists of stolen property and evidence.
  • Be aware that most law enforcement agencies will not give you information over the phone. They would, at the very least, like to know your identity to make sure you are not a thief checking to see if the gun is "hot". In some cases it may be a violation of state law to give out information from criminal history databases.
  • Should the gun be determined to be stolen, you will most likely have to surrender it to the police. Be prepared to answer lots of questions regarding how and where you bought it. Police have a great deal of interest in people selling stolen property.
  • If the gun appears to have had a serial number at one time, but it is ground off, or otherwise defaced - get away from the person trying to sell it to you as fast as possible. It is almost guaranteed to be either stolen or used in a crime. Removing serial numbers from a firearm is a Federal crime in itself, and if police discover such a gun in your possession, you have a very real chance of being convicted.
  • Many stolen guns cannot be identified because the owner didn't know the serial number, didn't report the theft, or it is an older gun without a number.
  • There are online databases of stolen guns. These rely on voluntary submissions from gun owners and therefore should be used with caution. They may not be up to date and may not be correct.
In Australia
  • Local law enforcement is the best bet.
In Canada
  • Again, local law enforcement is your best bet. They have access to the lists of stolen property and the Canadian Firearms Registry.
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Firearms
Mobile Phones
Colt Pistols and Rifles

How can you look up the serial number of a firearm - to find out if it is stolen - before purchasing it?

In the US
  • Call your local police/sheriff and ask them to check it for you. They will need the serial number, manufacturer, model, and caliber. This is important, since the same number may have been used by different manufacturers. Some manufacturers may have used the same number ranges for different product lines.

    If you are unsure what kind of gun it is, check with a gunsmith or a gun dealer. Do not rely on the police to figure that out; they are law enforcement professionals, not firearms experts.

    If the gun has no serial number - due to being produced before this was required - but is unique in some way, police may still have it listed as stolen property, but it's a long shot.

  • The NCIC (National Crime Information Center) database contains, among other things, information on stolen firearms but it is only accessible by law enforcement. This is likely what the local police will check, along with their own lists of stolen property and evidence.
  • Be aware that most law enforcement agencies will not give you information over the phone. They would, at the very least, like to know your identity to make sure you are not a thief checking to see if the gun is "hot". In some cases it may be a violation of state law to give out information from criminal history databases.
  • Another option is user submitted databases such as www.hotgunz.com and www.stolenweapon.com. These sites allow gun theft victims to voluntarily report their stolen firearm and search for stolen gun serial numbers. Such databases are not all encompassing as they are not linked with NCIC, but still worth a look.
  • Should the gun be determined to be stolen, you will most likely have to surrender it to the police. Be prepared to answer lots of questions regarding how and where you bought it. Police have a great deal of interest in people selling stolen property.
  • If the gun appears to have had a serial number at one time, but it is ground off, or otherwise defaced - get away from the person trying to sell it to you as fast as possible. It is almost guaranteed to be either stolen or used in a crime. Removing serial numbers from a firearm is a Federal crime in itself, and if police discover such a gun in your possession, you have a very real chance of being convicted.
  • Many stolen guns cannot be identified because the owner didn't know the serial number, didn't report the theft, or it is an older gun without a number.
In Australia
  • This website might be helpful: www.planetsoftware.com.au/gunreg You can only enter a serial number. The serial number on a gun is only unique for a particular manufacturer's model. If you have Winchester Model 94 serial #xxxxx and enter that serial number, you will get a hit if a Smith & Wesson revolver with that number is on the list.
In Canada
  • Again, local law enforcement is your best bet. They have access to the lists of stolen property and the Canadian Firearms Registry.
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Firearms
United States of America
Demographics
Flag of the United States
United States

How many gun owners are there in the United States of America?

Number of guns and gun owners in USA.Most estimates range between 39% and 50% of US households having at least one gun (that's about 43-55 million households). The estimates for the number of privately owned guns range from 190 million to 300 million. Removed those that skew the stats for their own purposes the best estimates are about 45% or 52 million of American households owning 260 million guns).

Some recent estimates:

  • A 2011 Gallup poll estimates that 47 percent of US households own a gun.
  • A 2007 Small Arms Survey estimates there are 88.7 guns per 100 Americans (#1 in the world for guns per capita)
  • A 2010 estimate from the NRA states "Privately owned firearms in the U.S.: Approaching 300 million, including nearly 100 million handguns. The number of firearms rises over 4 million annually."
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Firearms
Germany in WW2

How can you determine the age of a gun?

Age of a GunFirst you have to know what you have. There are published serial number lists for some manufacturers. Others marked their guns with a date code and some of these codes are available but others are not. And many of the old companies had no method of identifying the date of manufacture. So, some guns can be precicely dated while for others you may have to be content to know the range of years during which the model was manufactured or when the company existed.

Depends on the gun.

Some guns have the year stamped on them.

Some guns may be identified by the serial number.

Some guns can be dated by particular features they have.

Some guns cannot be dated any more accurately than the nearest decade.

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Firearms
Shotguns
Western Field Firearms

What is value of revelation 222 bolt action?

What MODEL of rifle? There were several sold under the Revelation brand. Different makers, different values.

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Firearms
Italy

What is the value of an Intercontinental Arms Inc Dakota 22 Caliber handgun in the original box made in Italy with an XX marking possibly indicating it?

10-100 USD or so

375376377
Firearms
Shotguns
Units of Measure
Black Powder Guns

How many grains of smokeless gun powder are in a pound?

1 pound = 7 000 grain

909192
Firearms

How do you find out who a gun is registered to?

In countries which have gun registration, such lists are made available only to law enforcement. They are not made available to the general public, nor should they be.

363364365
Firearms
Airsoft Guns and Accessories

What does muzzle velocity mean on a airsoft gun?

The velocity of the projectile being shot from the gun as it exits the barrel. It usually has more than 120 feet per second (fps)

In practical terms than more velocity projectile has than more far it will travel. Also bullet with higher speed inflict more damage or pain.

359360361
Firearms
Winchester Firearms

What does bbl mean when describing a gun?

It has a bolt

337338339
Firearms
Celebrities
Romantic Movies

Who is Suzi Barrett?

Suzi Barrett is an actress and a writer. See link below

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Firearms
Militaria

What is the value of a hipoint 9mm luger pistol?

New models can be purchased for roughly $250 plus $25-$40 depending on options.

If you go to a gun show you can buy them right from high-point for as low as 119$ and on gunbrokers.com for 139.99

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Firearms
Germany in WW2
Demographics
Death Rate

How many people were killed by guns in America last year?

The Centers for Disease Control says 11,493 people died from gun homicides.

899091
Firearms
American Gun Company

What is an American Gun Company 410 double barrel shotgun with exposed hammers worth?

American Gun Co. 410

This depends on the condition, but if it's broken, rusty, or just plain used, $50 or less. If it's in near mint condition, it could go up to $400. Most in "average" condition will go for $200-$250. If it were a larger gauge it would only bring about half as much, but 410's seem to be popular right now.

337338339
Law & Legal Issues
Firearms

What are some gun names?

YES, Kalashnikov- but let's include Mauser, Enfield, Winchester, Marlin, Colt, Smith & Wesson, Glock, Taurus, Ruger, Luger, Holland & Holland, Merkel, Parker, Purdey, Savage, Mossberg, Arisaka, Browning, Dan Wesson, Auto Ordnance, Mosin, Lebel- and the oldest gun maker still in business- Beretta. There are thousands more.

307308309
Firearms

Do they still make the leinad derringer?

The company is the propery of Sylvia and Wayne Daniels. "Leinad" is his last name spelled backwards.

They are currently not producing any and they don't speak about their future plans.

YES! Leinad Derringers are still made. I just bought one ( 8/2/2010) They are made under many names ( Leinad, FMJ , Cobray and a few others ) They are available in double and single barrel in .45LC/.410 and .451 black powder. ( barrels are interchangeable between BP and Smokless models BTW. Just check your state and local laws ) They can be bought from Practicaltactical.net or KYimports.com.

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Firearms
Shotguns

What is the value of a Deutsche Werke Werk Erfurt single shot 22?

Your DW is worth $150 in absolutely mint shape to a collector. They were poorly crafted firearms and the cocking mechanism was prone to early wear.

323324325
Firearms
Militaria
British Armed Forces (UK Military)

What does the MC in Sten. M.C. MK III mean?

The British term for a submachinegun was a "Machine Carbine". MC. See the link below for some more info on the Sten.

323324325
Firearms

How do you find serial number ruger revolver?

Ruger has a serial number search function on the company web site.

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Firearms
Industries and Professions
Nouns

What is Kimel Industries?

A manufacturer and distributor of firearms located in NC, they closed in 1999.

321322323
Clouds
Firearms
Shotguns

What is a four winds shotgun?

It's possible to make a shotgun from common steel plumbing parts. It takes four parts and can not be identified as a firearm when disassembled. So you can throw the parts to the four winds and nobody can charge you with possessing a firearm.

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Firearms
US Secret Service
US Marshals

What kind of gun does the ATF issue?

Big one

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