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Are you still at fault if the other person does not have insurance?

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2009-09-18 13:31:30
2009-09-18 13:31:30

Yes, If the accident was your fault, then it is your fault. Whether or not they have insurance has nothing to do with who's at fault, or who actually caused the accident.

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You will be cited for driving without insurance and the other driver being at fault, him and his insurance are still liable for damages.


Who is it that doesn't have insurance (your, or the 'other' person)? If you don't have insurance and are at fault there is no way you can receive any money for the car. If ther other person involved is missing insurance then you will still be covered if you pay for collision or uninsured motorist.


NO your insurance will not pay because you were drinking and driving which is ILLEGAL. You were at fault. It doesnt matter if you were stopped and the other person hit you you were still driving under the influence. YOU SHOULD GO TO JAIL.


No, the insurance company when settling the claim will have you sign a waiver of damages for their insured before giving you a check.


You can take the other person to court and hopefully get a judgment against them. But even this is no guarantee you'll ever get anything from them. If you have collision, comprehensive, and medical, you should be able to collect from your insurance company and let them sue the at-fault party. Normally, you are required to have uninsured motorist coverage, check your policy. Then talk to an attorney. It involves suing your own insurance company but is still a not at fault accident.


It shouldn't because it was their fault. Also the other company would have to pay for all the damage and only their insurance would go up.


Florida's no fault car insurance pertains to medical payments. The insurance states that the insurance company will pay for your bodily injury claims regardless of who was at fault for the accident. Damage done to property (i.e. the car) would still be covered by the at fault party. The Florida no fault car insurance is a benefit because one does not have to worry about not having their medical needs covered because the accident was the fault of the other party and they do not have sufficient insurance.


You get a ticket and your insurance goes up. You can not drive without a license and if you cost the insurance company money they raise your premiums especially if you get a ticket


I am not familiar with California laws but... In 99% of cases, the person who rear-end's you is at fault. If the other person is at fault, they are liable for damages and medical injuries. The fact that you are not insured does not make the at fault driver not responsible for damages and injuries that he or she causes.


You are responsible for the damage you cause in an accident, regardless if you are insured or not. Having insurance transfers your responsibility to pay for the damage from you to your insurance company. If there are injuries to the other party, then the other party's insurance should pay for their injuries, but you are still responsible for the property damage you have caused the other person.


If you have collision coverage on your vehicle you can collect from your insurance company for the damages. You will not have to pay the deductible if you were determined by the insurance company to not be at fault for the accident. They then go after the other insurance company to get the money they paid you back. If you do not carry collision coverage then you need to file with other insurance company, they will then decide who was at fault for the accident if their party was at fault they then pay you for the damages to your vehicle.


Yes, you are still at fault. It doesn't matter whether or not they had insurance, you still hit their vehicle and are therefore still responsible for their damages.


your still in trouble since you dont have a License,if you have a mean judge,


Yes, this is because as you stated, the insured driver was at fault. The at fault driver is responsible regardless of the insured status of the person they hit. A good rule of thunb is this,, If they had insurance would I be responsible If the answer is Yes, then the answer is still Yes


The insurance company is the one that determines fault so if you deny it, they can still rule against you.


This depends on many factors, including the ability of the other person to pay for your damages. Some insurance policies will not require you to pay a deductible. Others will. If the other person can pay for the damages, you and your insurance will not have to pay.


The presumption is that if you were rear ended, the other driver is at fault. The brake lights not working is a mitigating factor, but the bulk of the blame still goes with the other driver. Insurance doesn't have any relation to fault. But it coculd get you a ticket.


The license status of the other driver has no bearing on your liability. If you were at fault you are still responsible for any damages and injuries. Just report it to your insurance company as you would any other accident.


Each person is responsible for their own medical expenses. Each injured person can bring suit against the person who is at fault even though they did not have insurance. They are still the responsible party whether or not they had insurance. Good Luck though.


You do not have to pay the deductible if the other person's insurance is paying the claim. If you put the claim through your insurance, and do not have uninsured, underinsured motorist protection then you will have to pay the deductible regardless of who's at fault.


No fault insurance refers to injuries, not property damage. Being in a no fault state simply means that your injuries are payed for by your own insurance company regardless of who is at fault in an accident. Fault is still assigned for the purpose of determining who is responsible for property damage. It is always the at-fault party's responsibility for pay for the damage they cause to you. If you are going to have the damage for your car payed for under your collision coverage then you will have to initially pay for your deductible, unless you have broad-form collision. If you do pay your deductible then your insurance company will sue the at-fault party to recover the money that they payed to repair your car, as well as your deductible for you. This process is called subrogation.




You still get slammed. The logic that you not having a driver's license means you shouldn't have been there.


No, if you were negligent, and 'at fault' you still are, however, if they leave the scene doesn't sound like you will have to fix their vehicle, but you could still have a 'chargeable' accident on your policy.



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