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Answered 2012-05-19 20:09:20

whT happens to my ins. When I turn65qqq

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Contact your local Social Security Administration office to enroll in Medicare Part A.


if you are enrolled in it no, you can decline to enroll on medicare


Regardless of where you live, you enroll in Medicare by contacting the Social Security Administration.


You can enroll in Medicare after age 65, but you will likely not be able to backdate coverage to your 65th birthday.


Visit www.medicare.gov to compare Medicare HMO's in your area. You can then select one and enroll on the website.


absolutely! If you have stage IV Kidney disease, you cannot enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, but FFS Medicare does cover dialysis.


If by "pay Medicare" you mean the Medicare payroll tax, the only way to avoid this is to work at a job that is not covered by Medicare. There aren't very many of these. If you're referring to Medicare premiums, the law does not require anyone to enroll in Medicare.


Yes, because there will probably be a penalty for late enrollment, and your employer's health insurance will probably require you to enroll in Medicare.


Medicare does not require you to enroll. However, your private insurance company will probably require you to do so.


There is no law requiring one to enroll in Medicare. However, many private insurers require this.


You don't need to do anything. Whenever you turn the age of 65, you will automatically be enrolled in Medicare. You should get a Medicare card approximately 3 months prior to your birthdate.


Call your local Social Security office - they are the ones who can sign you up.



Answers about Medicare Plans and other Health Insurance Plans - Liberty Medicare Liberty Medicare is here to help you learn and enroll in a Medicare Plan or Individual Health Insurance Plan that's right for you. We provide simple solutions for all your healthcare needs.


During your working life, you pay Medicare tax out of your paycheck. That tax pays for your Medicare Part A (hospitalization). When you turn 65 and enroll in Medicare, you can choose to enroll in Part B (medical/doctor's office). The premium for Part B for 2009 is $96.40 per month (if you make less than $85,000.00 per year) which is automatically deducted from your Social Security check.


During your working life, you pay Medicare tax out of your paycheck. That tax pays for your Medicare Part A (hospitalization). When you turn 65 and enroll in Medicare, you can choose to enroll in Part B (medical/doctor's office). The premium for Part B for 2009 is $96.40 per month (if you make less than $85,000.00 per year) which is automatically deducted from your Social Security check.


Prescription coverage is available for anyone that is currently covered by Medicare. In order to get prescription coverage, one must enroll in one of two plans. Once a decision is made between the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan and the Medicare Advantage Plan there are numerous ways to enroll. One way is through the designated plan's website, another is to fill out a paper enrollment form.


Legally, no. However, private insurance plans generally have penalties for failure to do so.


Anyone who does not have Medicare Part A and/or Part B cannot enroll in a standalone Part d plan. or; If you have enrolled in a Medicare Advantage Plan, other than a PFFS plan you cannot enroll in a stand alone part d plan. or; If you are outside the enrollment periods of November 15th - December 31st of each year you cannot enroll without a special election period.


The Federal Mexican Army.



The law does not require enrollment in medicare. However, private insurance plans often contain a significant penalty for failing to do so.


The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) provided for a special enrollment period for Medicare Part B for TRICARE beneficiaries who have Medicare Part A. If you have Medicare Part A (which generally pays for hospital care) and don't have Medicare Part B (which generally pays for doctor visits) you may be able to enroll in Part B without paying a late enrollment penalty.


Usually your private plan will expect you to enroll in SMIB.


No, but if you are not on Social Security disability, you must be at least 65 years old to enroll.



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