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Answered 2006-07-27 18:40:35

The court does not allow a minor child to arbitrarily change residency from one custodial parent to another unless there is a court order allowing the action. The parent wishing to take custody of the child must file a petition for such in the appropriate state court in the city or county where they or in some cases the child resides.

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A DNA test can prove if the biological father is actually the father. If it is proven he is the father, then he should have all parental rights as any other parent.


Marriage by itself does not bring custody rights to non-biological children. Where the children go when the biological mother dies depends on who has custody, whether the non-biological father has adopted the child, whether the biological father wants the child, and on the laws of the state where all of this is happening.


No. It's always the biological parents who first has the obligation to support their child, not the state.



Only if the child is adopted or the mother decides to drop it. if she does decide to drop it she can still ask for it whenever if she needs financial support. The state is not going to pay if she needs help and you are not paying child support. It's first and foremost the biological parents obligation to pay for their child.


In the state of Illinois, a biological father cannot give up his rights to the mother, but he can sign over his rights to another male. For example, a step father


No, the father on the birth certificate is financially responsible unless proven that he's not the father by DNA. About 12 years ago in the state of NJ The court ordered me to pay child support to the biological father (Dna test showed I was not the biological father) The court called me the psychological father so in the courts opinion I was her father. And like the biological Mother he also drank it away.


No. If there is not a custodial order in place the law presumes that an unmarried mother has full custodial rights to her child and does not need permission from the biological father or the court in matters concerning the child. In addition, when a child is born out-of-wedlock the biological father must establish paternity before custodial, visitation and child support can be addressed.


Only if the child is named in the deceased's Will. He or she would not be entitled to an inheritance by way of state probate succession laws.


Depends on the circumstances. Please consider the situation. The biological father is living with the mother and child/children, therefore he is (or should be) aiding in the support of the household. If the father is not living with the mother and child the mother can and should file for support regardless of the status of her current relationship with the biological father. If you are referrring to state aid regarding the care of a minor child/children, the court will NOT allow such action when the biological father is present. Of course the family may qualify for other public assistance benefits based upon their current economic circumstances.


That depends on state law where you live. Where I live, if the man has reason to believe he is indeed the biological father, he can petition the court of jurisdiction for paternity testing to establish it. Once he has been established as the biological father, he can file a motion to amend the birth certificate based on the same.


In general, adoption terminates the biological parent's support obligation. However, the arrears are still due, unless otherwise ruled on by the court, and provided none is owed a state agency.


So what relationship are you to the parent or the child? If you were married when the child was born, you are assumed to be the father. Unless someone else is listed on the birth certificate, you're going to be expected to support the child.


Depends on the circumstances, to the father, to the state, and was her parent rights suspended?


If there is joint custody of the child then the father should be told by the mother where she is going with the child and for how long. If the mother wants to live in another State the courts will have to decide visitation rights. Example: The father has may have the child one or two weeks during the summer; possibly Christmas or alternative Christmas', etc. If the father does not have joint custody then the mother can leave with the child to another State without his permission, but to be fair to the child the father should be informed unless the father has a criminal record; drugs, etc., and is an unfit father.


If this involves a case where the child is the result of an affair, and does not reside in a putative father state in which the husband would be the presumed father, he would not be served. see related article below


You should definitely file for a child support order. The court will decide on the amount according the the state child support guidelines. A father who doesn't work is still responsible for supporting his child. If you obtain a child support order now, it can be modified when he gets a job.You should definitely file for a child support order. The court will decide on the amount according the the state child support guidelines. A father who doesn't work is still responsible for supporting his child. If you obtain a child support order now, it can be modified when he gets a job.You should definitely file for a child support order. The court will decide on the amount according the the state child support guidelines. A father who doesn't work is still responsible for supporting his child. If you obtain a child support order now, it can be modified when he gets a job.You should definitely file for a child support order. The court will decide on the amount according the the state child support guidelines. A father who doesn't work is still responsible for supporting his child. If you obtain a child support order now, it can be modified when he gets a job.


In all U.S. states the biological unwed mother is considered to have sole legal and physical custody of her child. If the biological father wishes to assert his parental rights he must first establish paternity to the child in question and petition the court for visitation privileges or custodial rights. If the mother wishes to pursue child support for the minor child she must show proof of paternity (signed birth certificate, or notarized affidavit for the father). It is the responsibility of the alledged father to prove he is or is not the biological father of the child, regarding custody, visitation and/or obligation of financial support.


You need to see a lawyer. Look for "Legal Aid" in your state as they offer free or low-cost legal advice. If someone is the "biological" father, he doesn't adopt the child, it is his child. He is legally obligated (in the USA) to provide support (money) for the child's needs. The only exception is if the mother was married to another man at the time of the birth, then legally the husband is considered the baby's father (even if everyone knows and admits that the other man is the baby's biological father). If you're asking whether the biological father can be forced to take care of the child in his own house, the answer is "no" he can give up his parental rights to the child. If you're asking whether the biological father can take the child away from the mother and her boyfriend/husband, the answer is "maybe" if he can PROVE to a court that the baby's mother is unfit and he (the biological father) is a better parent. If the father WANTS to be involved in the baby's life even though the mother has a new boyfriend/husband, the father MUST be allowed to have visitation with his child. Not allowing him to see the child may cause the courts to consider the mother not fit to raise the child. Again, GET LEGAL ADVICE from a lawyer.


I don't know what the term "legal stranger" is supposed to mean. The biological father is the biological father, period, regardless of what he may have done; he has all the parental rights of a biological father who is also a noncustodial parent unless they've been specifically removed by a court.



Well if the Bio father is unaware of the baby then I don't believe he has to pay child support because the mom decided that the father didn't need to know about the child and if the child is adopted (like me) either by a step dad or by a different set of parent AND the father know about the child Then the father would need to pay back child support.


No. If the state is providing support for the child it has the right to be reimbursed by the father.No. If the state is providing support for the child it has the right to be reimbursed by the father.No. If the state is providing support for the child it has the right to be reimbursed by the father.No. If the state is providing support for the child it has the right to be reimbursed by the father.



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