Debt and Bankruptcy
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Bankruptcy Law

Before discharge of a chapter 7 active bankruptcy can you apply for credit or will it affect you bankruptcy?

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2009-12-21 18:18:39
2009-12-21 18:18:39

No legitimate commercial lender will grant you credit while you are in a Chapter 7. Any applications will be turned down and will adversely affect your credit score. The only possible credit situation would be a mortgage restructuring, if you are reaffirming the mortgage, and even then they prefer to wait until you are discharged.

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Related Questions


A bankruptcy is active from the moment of filing until the case is closed. For chapter 7s, that is usually about 6 months. A chapter 13 may be active for 60 months.


Under the bankruptcy laws effective on October 17, 2005, Chapter 7 cannot be filed unless the debtor was discharged from the previous Chapter 7 or bankruptcy more than eight years ago. The debtor cannot file a Chapter 13 unless: (1) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 7, 11 or 12 more than four years ago; or (2) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 13 more than two years ago. The above notes discharge dates. There are methods to convert an active Chap 13 to a 7.


Under the bankruptcy laws effective on October 17, 2005, Chapter 7 cannot be filed unless the debtor was discharged from the previous Chapter 7 or bankruptcy more than eight years ago. The debtor cannot file a Chapter 13 unless: (1) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 7, 11 or 12 more than four years ago; or (2) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 13 more than two years ago. The above notes discharge dates. There are methods to convert an active Chap 13 to a 7.


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THIS QUESTION HAS BEEN ASKED AND ANSWERED MANY, MANY TIMES. IT IS PART OF THE DATABASE HERE. PROPERLY USING THE SYSTEM MEANS YOU WOULD HAVE GOTTEN THE ANSWER WITHOUT HAVING TO WAIT! (Or inconveniencing others and wasting valuable resources). (And consider that if you don't understand how to use this simple system, whcih actually asked if those questions were what you were asking before forcing this into the active forum - you really should only consider having your own personal lawyer handle EVERYTHING to do with your financial matters and any BK issues which are all much much more complex and less forgiving of not adhereing to the system). Under the bankruptcy laws effective on October 17, 2005, Chapter 7 cannot be filed unless the debtor was discharged from the previous Chapter 7 or bankruptcy more than eight years ago. The debtor cannot file a Chapter 13 unless: (1) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 7, 11 or 12 more than four years ago; or (2) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 13 more than two years ago.


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THIS QUESTION HAS BEEN ASKED AND ANSWERED MANY, MANY TIMES. IT IS PART OF THE DATABASE HERE. PROPERLY USING THE SYSTEM MEANS YOU WOULD HAVE GOTTEN THE ANSWER WITHOUT HAVING TO WAIT! (Or inconveniencing others and wasting valuable resources). (And consider that if you don't understand how to use this simple system, which actually asked if this question were what you were asking before forcing this into the active forum - you really should only consider having your own personal lawyer handle EVERYTHING to do with your financial matters and any BK issues, which are all much much more complex and less forgiving of not adhereing to the system. And wonder if one reason you are in such continual financial touble could be your failing to correctly utilize or understand the information available to you). Under the bankruptcy laws effective on October 17, 2005, Chapter 7 cannot be filed unless the debtor was discharged from the previous Chapter 7 or bankruptcy more than eight years ago. The debtor cannot file a Chapter 13 unless: (1) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 7, 11 or 12 more than four years ago; or (2) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 13 more than two years ago.


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THIS QUESTION HAS BEEN ASKED AND ANSWERED MANY, MANY TIMES. IT IS PART OF THE DATABASE HERE. PROPERLY USING THE SYSTEM MEANS YOU WOULD HAVE GOTTEN THE ANSWER WITHOUT HAVING TO WAIT! (Or inconveniencing others and wasting valuable resources). (And consider that if you don't understand how to use this simple system, which actually asked if those questions were what you were asking before your forcing this into the active forum - you really should only consider having your own personal lawyer handle EVERYTHING to do with your financial matters and any BK issues which are all much much more complex and less forgiving of not adhereing to the system. And wonder if one reason you are in such continual financial touble could be your failing to utilize or understand the information provided to you). Under the bankruptcy laws effective on October 17, 2005, Chapter 7 cannot be filed unless the debtor was discharged from the previous Chapter 7 or bankruptcy more than eight years ago. The debtor cannot file a Chapter 13 unless: (1) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 7, 11 or 12 more than four years ago; or (2) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 13 more than two years ago.


THIS QUESTION HAS BEEN ASKED AND ANSWERED MANY, MANY TIMES. IT IS PART OF THE DATABASE HERE. PROPERLY USING THE SYSTEM MEANS YOU WOULD HAVE GOTTEN THE ANSWER WITHOUT HAVING TO WAIT! (Or inconveniencing others and wasting valuable resources). (And consider that if you don't understand how to use this simple system, which actually would have asked if this or a similar question were what you were here asking about - before your failure to think/understand forced this into the active forum - you really should only consider having your own personal lawyer handle EVERYTHING to do with your financial matters and any BK issues. All of which are much much more complex and less forgiving of not adhereing to the system than this. And I wonder if one reason you are in such continual financial touble could be your failing to utilize or understand the information provided to you? Apparently you didn't get the expected or best results using the BK system the last time - intended for maybe once in a lifetime - either.) Under the bankruptcy laws effective on October 17, 2005, Chapter 7 cannot be filed unless the debtor was discharged from the previous Chapter 7 or bankruptcy more than eight years ago. The debtor cannot file a Chapter 13 unless: (1) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 7, 11 or 12 more than four years ago; or (2) the debtor received a discharge under Chapter 13 more than two years ago.



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