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2014-11-22 02:55:04
2014-11-22 02:55:04

If the original holder had an action. The quit claim deed only gives the individual the same rights as the original person.

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Related Questions


deed in lieu after foreclosure?


Deed in lieu of foreclosure is not nearly as devastating to your credit as is a full foreclosure. Below is an article about the pros and cons of deed in lieu.



A letter requesting the deed in lieu of foreclosure is written to the bank. You should explain the foreclosure situation and request the deed afterward.


You can't remove your name from a deed. After the foreclosure sale a foreclosure deed will be recorded from the lender to the new owner. Your deed will remain on record as part of the record history of the property.


You could file a quit claim deed. It will not remove your obligations under the mortgage and since the quit claim means they get the same rights you have, it doesn't to any good, except if there is any equity in the property after the sale, they will get it, not you.


If you're asking if the defaulting mortgagor can stop the foreclosure by executing a deed and conveying the property the answer is no. To execute a deed wouldn't create a cloud on the property. The property would be transferred subject to the mortgage and the lender can continue with the foreclosure by giving notice to the grantee.


There are different reasons. In some cases the bank will take the property by a deed in lieu of foreclosure or simply by a quitclaim deed if there is equity in the property and the bank can resell it.There are different reasons. In some cases the bank will take the property by a deed in lieu of foreclosure or simply by a quitclaim deed if there is equity in the property and the bank can resell it.There are different reasons. In some cases the bank will take the property by a deed in lieu of foreclosure or simply by a quitclaim deed if there is equity in the property and the bank can resell it.There are different reasons. In some cases the bank will take the property by a deed in lieu of foreclosure or simply by a quitclaim deed if there is equity in the property and the bank can resell it.


Yes. Lenders sell homes they have taken by foreclosure or acquired by deed.Yes. Lenders sell homes they have taken by foreclosure or acquired by deed.Yes. Lenders sell homes they have taken by foreclosure or acquired by deed.Yes. Lenders sell homes they have taken by foreclosure or acquired by deed.


A deed in lieu of foreclosure is a deed to real property accepted by the lender from a borrower who is in default. It is accepted in order to avoid the expense of a foreclosure. If you are in default you would need to negotiate with your lender to see if they would accept a deed in lieu of foreclosure from you. There may be other consequences of a deed in lieu so you should seek the advice of an attorney if you are in default and contemplating your options. There may be a community service available for foreclosure counseling in your area.


If you are not on the deed for the property and yet you signed the mortgage then it is likely that you also signed the note. In that case you obligated yourself to pay a mortgage for property you don't own. In that case the bank will not release you from the mortgage. You will remain responsible for the mortgage until it is paid off. if it goes into foreclosure it will affect your credit record. A quitclaim deed would have no effect on the situation. If you did not sign the note then the foreclosure will simply go forward and you will not be involved.


You must pay the mortgage or the lender will take possession of the property by foreclosure.


Often confused with a "short sell", a "deed in lieu" is used when a homeowner facing foreclosure asks the lender to accept the deed instead (in lieu) of foreclosure. A sample request for a deed in lieu can be found at the source below.



No. The deed would only complicate the foreclosure process and cause an increase in legal costs. The mortgage takes priority over the deed since it was granted first. The grantee in the quitclaim deed would take the property subject to the mortgage. The foreclosure would still be filed against the mortgagor.


A foreclosure deed is the deed required to be filed by the winning bidder at the auction, usually within 30 days, assuming the bidder is able to complete whatever s/he needs to actually pay for the property.


Quick Claim Deed is usually misspelled and should be Quit Claim Deed. If you are granting the deed you are "quitting" any interest in the property. A quitclaim deed is a fast and effective way of transfering property.


It is a disposition option sometimes available to the mortgagor (borrower) to voluntarily deed the property to the mortgagee (lender) thereby avoiding foreclosure action.When a mortgage is delinquent and loss of the home is inevitable, a borrower may negotiate with the bank to return the home. They hand over the "deed" instead of the bank paying a trustee or attorney to initate foreclosure proceedings. This is slightly less damaging to the borrowers credit and saves the bank money and time.


With the consent of the property owner and lender, the deed is valid immediately after it is recorded in the county public records. It is a good way to avoid the foreclosure process, but, oddly, many lenders will not accept such a deed and insist on the expensive and tedious foreclosure process.


Yes. In Massachusetts and other states there is a procedure whereby the mortgagor gives the bank a deed in lieu of foreclosure. You should discuss a "deed in lieu of foreclosure" with the mortgage department of your lender.


No. If the husband is a grantee on their deed then he must sign the deed in lieu of foreclosure. If only the wife signed then the lender would acquire only the wife's interest in the property.No. If the husband is a grantee on their deed then he must sign the deed in lieu of foreclosure. If only the wife signed then the lender would acquire only the wife's interest in the property.No. If the husband is a grantee on their deed then he must sign the deed in lieu of foreclosure. If only the wife signed then the lender would acquire only the wife's interest in the property.No. If the husband is a grantee on their deed then he must sign the deed in lieu of foreclosure. If only the wife signed then the lender would acquire only the wife's interest in the property.


A deed in lieu of foreclosure refers to the process of handing over a property deed to the mortgage financier and no longer having to pay the mortgage. The property now belongs to the company who financed the mortgage.


If you didn't sign the mortgage then the bank can't come after you for payment in the case of a default. However, they can foreclose on the mortgage and take possession of the property notwithstanding the quitclaim deed to you.


It is a "quit claim deed" that you have to obtain and you have to refinance to drop the other name. It is a "quit claim deed" that you have to obtain and you have to refinance to drop the other name. It is a "quit claim deed" that you have to obtain and you have to refinance to drop the other name. It is a "quit claim deed" that you have to obtain and you have to refinance to drop the other name.


Try www.udeed.com for deed preparation



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