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Can a collector still continue collection efforts after it has fallen off your credit report and how can you keep it from being reported again?

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2010-08-20 15:40:36
2010-08-20 15:40:36

The debt should be removed from the report after the seven to ten years. However it is not unusual for the consumer to have to contact the credit bureaus and demand their report be corrected. A debt does not become invalid simply because it is expunged from a credit report, but each state has a statute of limitations that WILL end the debt if you do not pay anything on it for a certain number of years. Check with your state to find out about its statute of limitations.

The debt shouldn't be reported again after the time has expired. The exceptions would be if the creditor won a judgment (which would have its own time limit starting from the judgment date) or if it is an income tax debt.

While the above is true, you will still probably have to deal with what we call "bottom feeders". These are collection agencies which buy old collection accounts for pennies and set about collecting by any means they can find.

This, unfortunately, also includes illegal means. Although these bottom feeders are still governed by the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (see the Federal Trade Commission's Website for your free copy) they hope the consumer will not be aware of their rights. They will threaten lawsuits, revocation of drivers licenses, arrest, and (this is extreme but did happen) rape. All, of course, illegal in every state of the union.

One more thing: NEVER PAY ON THE DEBT IF YOU DON'T OWE IT! The moment you pay even a penny on a collection your statute of limitations is RESET and you may have to go through the whole thing again.

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