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Answered 2011-12-28 15:49:16

No. The child is now eighteen and he or she can make their own decision although that may cause trouble if the child still lives with the "custodial" parent.

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The custodial parent is the parent in which the child resides with. My son lives with me and I am the custodial parent, his dad has visitation rights and pays child support.


In Louisiana at what age can a child opt out of visitation with the non-custodial parent?


The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.The child visitation order must be obeyed. If the child refuses to go the non-custodial parent can file a motion for contempt and the custodial parent will need to explain the situation to the court.


A custodial parent is obligated to let the non-custodial visit the child if there is visitation schedule in place. If there is none, it is not illegal for the custodial parent to refuse visitation.


custodial parent should take it to court. if the custodial parent keeps the child away from the non custodial parent then the custodial parent could do jail time


the custodial parent is the parent the child lives with the non custodial parent is the parent the child does NOT live with the non custodial parent assuming he / she knows he is a parent... is usually the patitioning parent. if he /she chooses not to seek visitation rights the court cannot force him/ her to see the child.... but they can enforce child support. research the laws for your state.


The visitation order determines the time that the non custodial parent may have with the minor child/children.


The non-custodial parent should file for visitation rights for the child in the county where custody was given. If the parent who has custody of the child is preventing the non-custodial parent the right of visitation they can be found in contempt of court if visitation has already been established. If the custodial parent has too many repeated contempts filed against them, custody can be switched to the other parent.


who pays for child 's visitation travel expenses when custodial parent moves to the other end of the States?


No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.No. That authority is not given to a custodial parent. Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent must pursue contempt of court charges in order to collect arrears. She cannot refuse to follow the visitation order.



It's not the custodial parent who can end a court ordered visitation, only the court can do that. But if the non-custodial parent gives up the parental rights or they are taken away by the court, the custodial parent will still recieve child support.


The answer depends on whether you are the custodial parent or the non-custodial parent.Denial of visitation rights by the custodial parent can result in a contempt of court order and if that parent continues to violate the visitation order they could eventually lose custody.If the non-custodial parent does not follow the visitation schedule either by failure to pick the child up at the appointed times of dropping by at unscheduled times, the custodial parent can return to court and ask that the visitation schedule be modified.It creates a difficult and stressful situation for the child and the parent who is not violating the order when the order isn't followed.



Yes. The custodial parent must report the abuse to the proper authorities.


Whether or not a parent is paying child support is irrelevant when the issue is visitation rights. If there is a court order for visitation the primary custodial parent must allow it or be found in contempt of court. If there is not a court order in place the custodial parent can make the decision to when, where or if visitation is allowed. Visitation guidelines are usually established during the custodial proceedings.


Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.Neither the court nor the father can force the non-custodial parent to take advantage of their visitation rights. The custodial parent can return to court to request a modification of the existing visitation order if the parent continues to violate it. It's not fair to the child to continue to be prepared for a visitation that doesn't take place.


If there is a court order to that affect the child and the custodial parent must adhere to the terms of the visitation order. If that does not take voluntarily take place the non custodial parent can petition the court to make visitation mandatory. The exception would be if by allowing a minor child to engage in visitation with the non custodial parent it would place the child in an environment of neglect and/or endangerment.


No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.No. The custodial parent must obtain the court's approval and the consent of the non-custodial parent, if possible. Courts do not take it lightly when a child is separated from a parent with visitation rights. The court will examine the situation and address the matter in the best interest of the child.


If there's a court order, yes.Answer & ClarificationNo. A non-custodial parent cannot be forced to comply with a visitation order. Courts require custodial parents to comply with court ordered visitation. Courts do not have the ability to enforce visitation upon the non-custodialparent.


For safety reasons the custodial parent should know where the child will be in case something happens to the non-custodial parent or if the child is not returned. If the non-custodial parent won't cooperate the custodial parent should return to court and request a court order.


Child support and visitation are two separate issues. The custodial parent can file a suit for child support but cannot deny the non custodial parent custodial or vistation rights is said parent wants those rights. That being said, the non custodial parent can file for custody or visitation regardless of whether the child support issue is addressed or not. Such matters are decided by the court if the parents cannot find an equitable solution.


If you're in the US, the child can decide at 18. Until then if the non-custodial parent has a visitation order that must be followed. If there is a legitimate reason why the child does not want to visit, then the custodial parent needs to go to court and request that the visitation order be changed.


You continue to pay support until otherwise ordered by the court. If the parent moved out of state without court permission or in violation of a custody order interfering with the non-custodial parent's visitation rights, the non-custodial parent may file an action against the custodial parent for the same, or file for a modification in visitation, forcing the custodial parent to return the child for visitation as outlined in the original order.


Unless there is a court order which prevents the non-custodial parent from having access to the child, then you should not deny the visitation unless you have absolute proof that allowing visitation is a danger to your child. It's best to speak to a lawyer and find out about modifying any current custodial order that may already be in place if necessary.



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