Cars & Vehicles

Can a new car dealer finance a new car purchase?

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2010-06-15 21:21:23
2010-06-15 21:21:23

Yes, new car dealers can finance a new purchase. Many dealers work with multiple banks to help find financing for their customers.

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There are many ways to finance a new car. One option is to finance through the dealer as they occasionally offer no interest loans. You can also check at your local bank for a loan.


Depends where you bought it from, check with the dealer who sold it to you.


You can obtain financing for a new car purchase from a variety of sources such as banks, credit unions, online finance companies. The selling dealer will also have access to seller financing from sources such as Ford Motor Credit, Toyota Motor Credit, etc.


One can go to a local Nissan dealer to purchase a Nissan car. One can locate a dealer by going to the Nissan website and looking for desired locations.


There isn't anything you would need to do. You still owe the money and will need to continue paying. A bank or something similar may buy the rest of your loan from the dealership. If that happens it will be their job to notify you.-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------It is not usually the dealer which actually provides the finance, it is a finance company that is separate from the car dealer.When you purchase the car and take out finance, the finance company pays the dealer in full what he is owed and you then repay the finance company.If you look at your finance documents closely, they should tell you this.You should therefore continue to pay for your car as you were doing before the dealer went out of business. However, for your own protection make sure that you get a receipt (proof) that you have made each payment. If you are notified in writing to change your payments to a new company do this if the paperwork matches what you had before.If you are in doubt at all, go and see an attorney (lawyer).



If one is wishing to purchase a brand new Hyundai car it can be done at the nearest Hyundai dealer. The Hyundai website allows one to enter their location to assist in finding a dealer that is nearby.


Once you have signed the paperwork and driven it off the dealer lot it is nearly impossibly to get out of the purchase.


No, the buyers remorse law does not apply to the purchase of a new or used vehicle.


There is no cooling off period on the purchase of an automobile. Once you buy the car, you own it, and you will only be able to return it if the dealer agrees. They will never agree on a new car purchase, but on a used car they may, if you ask very nicely and buy a different car from the same dealer. So, ask the dealer and be very, very, nice about it. Legally they do not have to do anything.


just the opposite. If you finance the car through the dealer, he will realize a portion of your interest payment so the possibility of a discount is there.


If a dealer dented your new car, you are not eligible for a new car. The dealer is responsible for fixing the dent only.


If you have not signed a contract to purchase the vehicle then yes you can walk away. If however you have signed a purchase agreement, then you had better ask the dealer very nicely if you can get out of the contract.


If you have not signed a purchase agreement, yes. If you have signed, ask the dealer if you can back out. If the car has already been put in your name or you have driven it home, it is yours.


No, the buyers remorse law does not apply to the purchase of a new or used vehicle.


You cannot change your mind about a new car purchase. The dealer may work with you to take it back, but there is usually a restocking fee or a fee of some type that they will charge.


There is no right to rescission on any contract involving the purchase or lease of a vehicle. However the leasing dealer may allow you to cancel the lease with a penalty of course. You need to contact the dealers finance officer.



Dealer reserve is a kickback paid to car dealerships by the finance companies (including those owned by car manufacturers) for bringing in new customers. Dealer reserve can be defined as interest points that usually constitute two to four interest points added to the interest rate, and can tack on thousands to the price of a car and increase one's monthly payments by $30, $50 or more. This is basically how it works: The car manufacturer, say Ford Credit, offers to finance someone's new car purchase for 15%, but the car dealer doesn't tell the customer that. Instead, they tell him that the lowest interest rate he qualifies for is 19%. Ford Credit sends the check equal to the 4% markup to the dealership as a commission. The customer gets to pay off the 4% dealer reserve without realizing he actually qualified for a 15% rate!


Depending on the year one is looking to purchase, and whether one is looking to buy new or used, one can purchase from a Honda dealer. One may be able to find the car used at another car dealer, or for sale from private sellers.


You can of course return it but the dealer can refuse to take it back and in 99.9% of the time would refuse. After all the car is now a used car and cannot be sold as a new car any longer. The cooling off period law does not apply to the purchase of a vehicle new or used.


One can go to a local dealer in the New York area to purchase Classic Mini Cooper car parts. One can also purchase the car parts online at the official Mini Cooper website.


Most new car dealers will offer to do financing (usually through the manufacturers financing division). However, as with all loans, you must qualify, and your rates will vary.


You cannot return it. The buyers remorse law does not apply to the purchase of a new or used vehicle. You bought the car and you now own it.


I will love to finance a new car!



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