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Answered 2011-04-18 21:21:16

Well at this point if a repo agent is there to recover a vehicle or property, You no longer own your car or property the BANK does. If a repo agent gets proper authorities "police" and have paperwork stating the bank owns it the authorities can impel you to open your garage because now you are in possession of stolen property fully owned by the bank. but they also must give you a option to pay it up to date.

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No, repo persons can not enter your residence without permission and an attached garage is your property.


No, a repo man can enter your driveway but if the car is in a locked garage they do not have the right to enter without your permission. This rule applies to your home as well.


It is NOT legal to enter a garage in any state to repo a car, unless the repossession agent has a replevin order issued by the court that holds jurisdiction. Call a local attorney.


The car can only be repossessed from a locked garage if the car is spotted in the garage from a window or a crack, but the repo company cannot enter the garage if the car was not visibly spotted.


No, they cannot enter the garage locked or not without a court order. Likewise police would not get involved in the issue unless such an order was in place or they were called due to a physical altercation or other violation of the law.


NO. Have him arrested if he did that. _____ Sue the lender/bank do not waste your time with the Repo guys; they are agents of the bank so the bank is responsible for their conduct.


Nowhere is it legal for breaking and entry. Repomen/woman cannot enter a closed garage or locked gate to aquire property


Yes In most places hiding the car from the repo man is illegal. If he is sure the car is in there he can enter a storage place and reposes the car. But he is not allowed to intimidate or do violence to the person or property damage to make the repossession.


Probably not. If the garage is locked and the repo agent must break the lock, then that is breaking and entering. Even if the garage is unlocked and the act of opening it can (in some areas) be considered breaking and entering.


In brief, if they can get to it, yes they can.


Yes, but in most states they cannot get a vehicle locked in a garage.


Well yes, But if you lock your garage then the repo officer will have to come to your door in order to get the car.



In most states no, they cannot break into a locked garage to get the car.


NO, you cant do that in ANY state. It will get you sued quickly. Ohio Repo Laws


Yes! a repo agent can legally repossess collateral anywhere, as long as he doesn't breach the peace or break and enter into a locked garage or gate


yes they are allowed on your property hide it in the garage if you have one


Anywhere except Federal Property (unless they have the necessary permits and licensing) and Native American Reservations (unless they have the permission of the tribe). So, pretty much anywhere. The single exception is that they may not enter a closed building such as a garage, however, if the can successfully hook the car from outside the garage, most states will turn a blind eye to the vehicle being dragged out an open door. And, if you have the vehicle closed in the garage, the driver will attempt to request you surrender it. If you refuse, likely as not he will return with a replevin and a law enforcement officer to take possession of the vehicle. Just give it up.


Yes, the carbon monoxide in the exhaust can build up and poison anyone in a closed garage where the car is running. Never a good thing to do.


A repo guy is likely to say anything to get your car. If he's looking for it, you owe the money and he gets to take the car. Hiding it in the garage will keep him at bay for only a short time. Whether or not you have homeowner's insurance does not factor into the equation.


No. A repo agent is only permitted to move and enter the vehicle which they have an order for repossession on.


Unless the repoman is dumb as a duck, he WONT try to repo a car that is not authorized by the leinholder. IF management lets him in the garage, then he can go get it.Sometimes management will go ahead and let us in to get us out of the way. If the managment opens the doors yes the repo people can remove the vehichle The repo person can not open the door. the repo person has been told to recover the vehichle per the lien holder or they would not be there. I find that most lien holders would rather work something out to get account up to date then repo the car. The lien holder makes more money if they can get payment before repo.What I do not understand is why people hide the car , what good is the car if you can't drive it without looking over your shoulder wondering when they repo agent will show up and take the car so what good is a car you cant take out of the garage or drive?


Cant go in a locked door in ANY state legally. They will just get the police to come open the door with a court order. Make your payments and if you can't, talk to the lender. They do not want to repo the car.AnswerThey will not come with a police order....if they could they wouldn't waste timepaying repo guys.Just because it is against the law don't think the repo guyswon't do it.If they do break in and get the car it doesn't matter how they got itit is now the banks.You can sue the bank for the break in but you still don'thave the car back.And by the way the banks do want to repo that's why they do it. AnswerActually they DO NOT want to repo your car. This is because normally you owe more on the car than they could get for it at auction. They will repo it if they feel that that they cannot recover money for it, or if they are a buy here/pay here place. Finally, they CANNOT enter a garage locked or otherwise. If they do, they are in violation. You should try to work with the company.




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