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Answered 2010-12-01 18:11:53

Yes. Parentage and custody are different things.

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No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.No. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child in the United States. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court via a DNA test. Once established he can petition for custody and/or visitation. He will also be subject to a child support order if he mother is to retain physical custody.


NO. An unmarried mother has sole legal custody of her child in most jurisdictions. Unmarried fathers must establish their paternity legally and then petition the court for a custody or visitation order. Even after establishing paternity an unmarried father cannot just take the child. If he does, the mother should call the police immediately.


Only if unmarried to the father. Single mothers have sole custody in 49 states by default. This is regardless of whether she's living with the father or not. yes but if theres no legal paperwork then its whoever is holding the child


An unmarried mother has custody of her child until the father has established his paternity in court and requested joint custody.


No. The unmarried mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally, in court and then requested (and obtained) joint custody and visitations.No. The unmarried mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally, in court and then requested (and obtained) joint custody and visitations.No. The unmarried mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally, in court and then requested (and obtained) joint custody and visitations.No. The unmarried mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally, in court and then requested (and obtained) joint custody and visitations.


If the father did not sign the birth certificate, then you already have sole custody.


Yes the mother has the right to put the father on the birth certificate or not.


No. If the mother is unmarried then she has legal custody of her child automatically. If the father wants parental rights he must establish his paternity in court.No. If the mother is unmarried then she has legal custody of her child automatically. If the father wants parental rights he must establish his paternity in court.No. If the mother is unmarried then she has legal custody of her child automatically. If the father wants parental rights he must establish his paternity in court.No. If the mother is unmarried then she has legal custody of her child automatically. If the father wants parental rights he must establish his paternity in court.



Generally in the United States an unmarried mother has sole custody until the father has established his paternity legally.


If the parents are unmarried, simply being the name on the birth certificate doesn't bestow any custody rights. An unmarried father must establish his paternity in court and arrange for a custody hearing if he wants custody. Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Remember, a child's mother can always be identified by medical records. Since the father didn't give birth and he was not legally married at the time of the birth he must establish his paternity by signing the birth certificate at the time of birth (waiving DNA testing rights) which must be done with mother's consent. If he signs the birth certificate he may still need to establish paternity through DNA testing. If he doesn't sign the birth certificate then he must establish his paternity through a DNA test. A paternity test can be arranged through the court. Once paternity has been established the father can request visitations, joint custody, full custody or the court will set up a schedule of regular child support payments for the child if she is to remain in the custody of her mother. The court will schedule a hearing and issue an order that is in the best interest of the child.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody and control in most states until the father can establish his paternity. Once paternity is established in court, the father can request visitations or custody through the court. If the mother retains physical custody she can request that the court issue a child support order. If the father gets physical custody he can request a child support order.


If he can prove he's the father then he as a lot of rights. He doesn't have to sign the certificate. If the parents are unmarried he must establish his paternity legally, in court, and request custody or visitation rights. At that time the court can also issue a child support order.


Assuming this father is unmarried, he has the right to establish his paternity legally through the family court. Once his paternity has been established he can request joint custody and/or a visitation schedule and pay child support if the child is to remain in the physical custody of the mother.Assuming this father is unmarried, he has the right to establish his paternity legally through the family court. Once his paternity has been established he can request joint custody and/or a visitation schedule and pay child support if the child is to remain in the physical custody of the mother.Assuming this father is unmarried, he has the right to establish his paternity legally through the family court. Once his paternity has been established he can request joint custody and/or a visitation schedule and pay child support if the child is to remain in the physical custody of the mother.Assuming this father is unmarried, he has the right to establish his paternity legally through the family court. Once his paternity has been established he can request joint custody and/or a visitation schedule and pay child support if the child is to remain in the physical custody of the mother.


Yes, the birth certificate will not give him custody. The father have to prove paternity in court with a DNA test and he can then petition for visitation or custody. Then he can also pay child support.


If you are unmarried you would need to establish your "paternity" in court before you have parental rights. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child. She could have you ruled out as the father by requesting a DNA test through the courts. When you knowingly commit perjury on a birth certificate you create a difficult and messy situation for everyone involved. You should consult with an attorney.If you are unmarried you would need to establish your "paternity" in court before you have parental rights. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child. She could have you ruled out as the father by requesting a DNA test through the courts. When you knowingly commit perjury on a birth certificate you create a difficult and messy situation for everyone involved. You should consult with an attorney.If you are unmarried you would need to establish your "paternity" in court before you have parental rights. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child. She could have you ruled out as the father by requesting a DNA test through the courts. When you knowingly commit perjury on a birth certificate you create a difficult and messy situation for everyone involved. You should consult with an attorney.If you are unmarried you would need to establish your "paternity" in court before you have parental rights. An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child. She could have you ruled out as the father by requesting a DNA test through the courts. When you knowingly commit perjury on a birth certificate you create a difficult and messy situation for everyone involved. You should consult with an attorney.


The childs' father, married or not. Your relationship to the father is irrelevent. The father is the first on a long list of family members. Create a living will if that is not acceptable.



In the United States an unmarried mother has legal custody of her child unless and until the father establishes his paternity in court and requests custody and/or visitations.


Generally, if the parents are unmarried the mother has sole custody until the father establishes his paternity in court.


No. An unmarried mother has sole custody of her child until the courts become involved.


An unmarried mother has legal custody of her child until the father has established his paternity legally.


If the father's name is on the birth certificate, the mother must petition the court for full custody rights. If the petition is granted, it still will not relieve the father of his financial obligations. Even if the father's name is not on the birth certificate, it will not prevent him from taking action for cutodial rights in the future. If he has not shown an inclination to be involved in the child's life, or supported the child financially, the court would give little creedence to such a request.


There is no such provision for 49 states. In some states, a mother is presumed to have sole custody if no father is named on the birth certificate, in other states, a mother is presumed to have initial custody under the same circumstances, other states presume joint custody even if no father is named (someone had to do it, right?) and some states have no presumption of custody at all. For the law in each state, you will have to do your own homework on that.



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