Child Support

Can new spouse income affect child support?

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2012-06-24 17:19:12
2012-06-24 17:19:12

Not normally. The existence of a step-parent doesn't affect the responsibilities of the parent providing child support.

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Related Questions


your or your current husband income (probably) wont affect the child support.the child's fathers income will though.

No, child support is based on the biological parents income. no one elses.

A person is not responsible for their spouse's child support, so no, the court doesn't consider their income in setting child support.

In general, child support is a percentage of the obligor's net income. Unless there is a substantial difference in the parents' income (e.g., Donald Trump vs. a welfare recipient), the income of the obligee and/or the obligee's new spouse will not affect the amount of the obligor's support.

Generally, no. It is based on your income and not your expenses.

No, only the biological parents pay for their child.

if you are paying child support and have a new spouse, their income will not count toward child support unless the two of you have your own children together.

no the new spouse is not legally responsible for a child that is not theirs

No, unless the spouse is also a biological parent of the child.

No. Only the biological parents pay for their child.

It is considered very much in the state of California.

A spouse can be held liable for child support.

No, not in any state. Only the biological parents pay for their child.

No. A new spouse is not obligated to pay for a child they did not help conceive.

Your new spouse is not responsible for your child(ren).

No, not in any state. Only the biological parents pay for their child.

It depends on the state. Some states allow for spouse income to be affected by child support, like Texas and a few others. There are many however that do not take into account the spouse's earnings so if the non-custodial parents loses their job, their spouse income can not be used in consideration for child support payment amounts.

In general, remarriage should not increase or decrease one's child support obligation, regardless of the new spouse's income or the presence of stepchildren.

In general, remarriage should not increase or decrease one's child support obligation, regardless of the new spouse's income or the presence of stepchildren.

No. Child support is paid by non custodial parent, not step parent. Income of a New Spouse: Contrary to common belief, Illinois law permits judges to consider the income of a second spouse when establishing or modifying child support awards. The door swings both ways, too. A custodial parent who remarries a well-to-do spouse may suffer a reduction in child support to be paid by the non-custodial parent.19 Likewise, a non-custodial parent who remarries a spouse of substantial means may be required by the court to pay a higher child support than if the marriage had not taken place. http://www.illinoisdivorce.com/family_law_articles/etsblishing_child_support.php

The new spouse is not responsible for his/her spouse's children.

No, your ex's new spouse is not responsible for supporting your children ergo their income can not be considered when the courts calculate child support obligation for your ex.

In California, 20% of a second spouse or S/O income cane be used.


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