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2012-10-28 22:49:03
2012-10-28 22:49:03

Yes, if the car moves in only one direction.

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If the car has an average speed of 65 mph, when it returns to its starting point, it will have a displacement of zero and an average velocity of zero, because velocity has both speed and direction.


Velocity changes as direction is continuously changing.


no ... not SPEED OF A MOVING CAR ......IT is to measure the average speed of a carThis can help :DRoy , Brunei


No. Speed is how fast, Velocity is how fast AND in what direction. Think of a car driving in a circle at 60 mph. You change velocity as the car turns on the curve (new direction = new velocity), without changing your speed at 60mph.


rms means root mean square, or in a roundabout way the average. Therefore the average velocity or average speed (of a car?)


Speed is a scalar quantity (direction does not matter) and velocity is a vector quantity) ie velocity means speed in a specific direction. If you are changing direction (turning) in a car, your speed is the same, while your velocity changes.


The velocity of the car in this case is changing (to specify velocity, you indicate a speed and a direction), therefore the car is accelerating.The velocity of the car in this case is changing (to specify velocity, you indicate a speed and a direction), therefore the car is accelerating.The velocity of the car in this case is changing (to specify velocity, you indicate a speed and a direction), therefore the car is accelerating.The velocity of the car in this case is changing (to specify velocity, you indicate a speed and a direction), therefore the car is accelerating.


It reads instantaneous speed, and tells you nothing about average speed.


The answer is that u r travelling with an average speed for that time or a constant speed . it also means that u are travelling with a uniform velocity.


No, since they are traveling at the same speed their momentum is the same. However the velocity and exhilaration are different


The simple answer is no. Speed is defined as distance divided by time. Velocity always has a vector (direction). Instantaneous speed is velocity where the vector is not stated. I know this sounds a little complicated. But here is an example (draw yourself a picture): A car has a velocity of 100 km per hour with respect to the road. It is easy to see that the vector is going in the direction of the car. The point of contact of the tire with the road has zero velocity. The axle of the car has the same velocity and direction as the car. The velocity of the top of the tire therefore has TWICE the velocity of the car.


No. It's confusing unless you're into physics or mathematics but velocity is a vector quantity with speed is one aspect. Velocity includes speed and the direction of motion. A car is going 60 miles per hour as speed. A car is going 60 MPH due north is velocity.


If the velocity is constant there is no acceleration. Speed is not velocity, velocity has speed and direction. I A car going around a circular track at 60 mph keeps the same speed but changes direction and thus accelerates at a constant speed. Velocity is speed in a certain direction. So change the speed but keep direction the same and you change the velocity. or Change the direction while keeping the speed the same and you change the velocity. If the speed is constant, any change of direction is a change in velocity. Driving around in a circle is a case of constantly changing direction.


Speed is how fast you are going.Velocity is almost the same but for one thing: it also includes what direction you are moving.For example:A car can have a speed of 50 mph, but a velocity of 30 mph northwards.


Velocity is a vector (has a size and a direction) but speed is a scalar (just a number). The velocity is therefore given by the speed and the direction the speed is going. If you change the direction but continue at the same rate the velocity changes but the speed doesn't


Another car would have to travel at 70 km/hr west.To have the same velocity, it must have the same speed toward the same direction.


The speed of the car. The speed-o-meter only shows a magnitude ( or a number ) and to tell the velocity of a car it would have to give that speed some direction. Since the speedometer assigns no direction to the car, the number assigned as the speed of the car cannot be the velocity of the car.


The car speedometer shows instantaneous speed. -- It can't show average speed, because it doesn't know anything about what your speed was at any time in the past, before this moment. -- It can't show velocity, because it doesn't know anything about the direction you're going.


Velocity (or speed) = Distance ÷ Time In this example, speed = 300/6 = 50 kph


No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.No. The speed is the same, the velocity is not. The term "velocity" includes the indication of the direction. Two velocities are the same if they have the same magnitude (e.g., both are 40 km/hour), AND the same direction.


Velocity includes both speed and direction, so velocity will change when an object changes direction while maintaining it's speed. An example is a car at constant speed around a curve.


no. a SPEEDometer measures SPEED. not velocity: direction


Of course, since velocity is a vector quantity and speed is a scalar quantity, velocity has something speed does not: direction. Thus, an object can travel at the same speed by has a changing direction of movement, and therefore a changing velocity. For instance, a ball on a string moving in a circle at the same speed is constantly changing its velocity, which results in its path of motion.Yes. Velocity is (speed and direction of motion). If direction changes, then velocitychanges, even if speed is constant.Examples:-- Car going around a curve at a constant speed has changing velocity.-- Anything traveling a circular path at a constant speed has changing velocity.


Not necessarily. "To have the same velocity" means to have the same speed AND move in the same direction. A car driving north at 30 miles per hour and another one driving south at 30 miles per hour have the same speed but different velocities.


The question is inherantly flawed. A car traveling at a constant speed cannot accelerate, if it could it's speed would not be constant. "Constant speed" means that speed is not increasing or decreasing but remain consistent over time. For example, if you cover 10 feet during each second, your speed is constant. "Constant velocity" implies constant speed, but it has an additional constraint: you can't change your direction. If you travel constantly at 10 feet per second in a straight line, then your speed is constant and your velocity is constant. But if you travel constantly at 10 feet per second in a wiggly line (or a circle, or anything not straight), then your speed is constant but your velocity is NOT constant. If you travel at a constant speed but change direction, velocity is changed. Or if you travel in the same direction but change the speed, velocity is changed. Average speed is is easier: distance/time So, your question should read: Why can a car traveling at an average speed accelerate, but a car traveling at constant speed cannot? Or Why am I asking the wrong questions?



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