Custody
Law & Legal Issues
Child Support

Can the law force you to see your children?

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2017-10-01 14:44:02
2017-10-01 14:44:02

Generally, the court cannot force a parent to spend time with their children. However, there are different aspects of this situation that the court may address.


The custodial parent can request a modification of the visitation order to significantly reduce the time allotted to the NC parent so time no longer needs to be reserved for a parent who doesn’t show up. That would free up the custodial parent’s ability to schedule activities and child care. Also, the custodial parent could request an increase in child support since not sharing the parenting places more of a burden on the custodial parent.

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2017-10-01 14:30:58
2017-10-01 14:30:58

No. There is no law that says a parent must have contact with children. And that is justly so. It would seem a parent who was forced to have visitation would not be able to meet the emotional needs of the children.

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