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Can you rescind your decision to voluntarily relinquish your parental rights once the petition has been granted in Texas?

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2006-11-25 00:44:01
2006-11-25 00:44:01

If the child has been adopted you have no rights to this child any more you should speak with a lawyer from the state were the child lives. * No. When a parent(s) are granted a voluntary termination of parental rights or such rights are terminated by the court for reasons of abuse or neglect it is permanent and cannot be revoked or rescinded. This does not mean that the relinquishing parent cannot have contact with the child once said child reaches the legal age of majority (18) if the child is agreeable to a reconciliation.

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Guardians do not relinquish parental rights. Courts terminate parental rights when a guardian is appointed. The guardian must file a petition with the probate and family court to be appointed the child's guardian.

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You may petition the court in the county of jurisdiction with your request. Consult an attorney or the clerk of the court for the appropriate forms. Be prepared to provide acceptable reasons and appropriate documentation why your parental rights should be terminated. Also, you should be aware that termination of parental rights does not terminate your obligation to pay child support. All it will do is strip you of your right to see your child or have any decision making power in their lives.

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To legally relinquish his parental rights he would need to file a Termination of Parental Rights petition in the state court in the county in which the child resides.

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No. Once the court has granted the petition for parental rights to be terminated it is permanent. The parent(s) who voluntarily relinquished cannot have them reinstated. A permanent termination of parental rights by a court (not voluntarily) can be appealed under certain circumstances.

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Yes. He can file a Termination of Parental Rights (TPR) petition in the appropriate state court in the city or county where he resides.

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The person seeking guardianship must petition the court with reason and evidentiary documents as to why guardianship is necessary and why they are qualified to be appointed the legal guardian of the minor in question. Both biological parents must voluntarily relinquish their parental rights and agree to the guardianship or the court must terminate parental rights of both or of the parent who does not wish to give up his or her rights to their child.

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You may petition the court in the county of jurisdiction (where the child legally resides) with compelling reasons why your parental rights should be terminated. It should be noted that terminating parental rights does not terminate child support obligations unless the child is being adopted. All it does is terminate the parent's right to see their child as well as terminate their right to have any decision making power in the child's life.

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You file a petition in the court with jurisdiction (usually a family/civil court) in the county and state where the child is a resident. Please be advised, when a person wishes to legally adopt their new spouse's child the biological father or mother must be deceased or voluntarily relinquish his or her or have had parental rights permanently terminated by court order.

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That would depend on prevailing law where you reside. You need to consult an attorney.

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Assuming this person is the biological father, he would need to file a petition in the court of venue to voluntarily relinquish his paternal rights. If he meets the state TPR requirements and the judge finds the petition valid, his rights to the child/children will then be permanently terminated. He will then no longer be responsible for child support nor be allowed to participate in the child's/children's lives in any context.

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I do believe that any father/mother convicted of a felony in which a life sentence was enacted forfiets their parental rights. You may petition the court to file the necessary paperwork. As with any other issue, the ultimate decision lies with the court however; the fact that the parent will have no day to day influence on the child and will be unable to sustain a parent/child relationship, the court will more than likely relinquish any parental rights.

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In such a case, both biological parents must file a TPR petition voluntarily relinquishing their parental rights and the court must accept the petition before a child is eligible for adoption.

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Ohio has laws that allow the a parent to file a Termination of Parental Rights petition. Whether that petition is granted and to what extent is decided by the court based on the individual case circumstances. The voluntary relinquishment of parental rights is generally granted to allow a child/children to be a candidate for adoption. The court will not grant a TPR when its sole purpose is for a parent to escape financial obligations to their minor children.

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termination of parental rights.

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A person cannot force a parent to relinquish his or her rights to their minor children, only a court can permanently terminate parental rights. A biological parent can file a petition for the Voluntary Termination of Parental Rights in state court in the city or county where they live. The judge decides if the petition should be granted based upon what is best for the child or children that are involved. Another option to consider, go to the State Welfare office and ask to have his alimony and/or child support paid directly to them and have THEM issue the check. Men tend to be a little more punctual when they know the State is looking over their shoulder.

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No. If the biological father wants to assert parental rights he may file a petition with the court to order a paternity test taken. If presented with such an order the mother must comply or be held in contempt of court. A biological parent cannot be forced to relinquish parental rights it must be done voluntarily or said rights terminated by the court for reasons of abuse and/or neglect.

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If the mother is already the non-custodial parent, then the custodial father already has custody. If the question is meant to ask if the mother can give up her parental rights, then you would need to petition the court.

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A person can relinquish parental rights volutarily by filing a petition in the proper court if the information contained allows such actions in accordance with state TPR requirements. Or the court for reasons prescribed in state statutes can permanently terminate parental rights. Both procedures have to be done according to the proper legal procedures simply signing a paper proclaiming such an action is not considered legally acceptable under the laws of the state.

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There is no action of the sort referred to possible in any U.S. state. If what is meant is how can a parent voluntarily relinquish parental rights, then the procedure is to file a Termination of Parental Rights (TPR) petition in the appropriate state court in the city or county where the children reside. TPR is only granted when it serves the best interest of the child or children, such as allowing them to become eligible for adoption. It is NOT a means for parents to be relieved of their financial obligations to their biological children.

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You would need to petition the family court in the county of jurisdiction over the case and provide clear and compelling reasons why parental rights should be terminated. If the child in question isn't being put up for adoption, this will not be an easy thing to do. You cannot relinquish parental rights "just because" although the courts may involuntarily terminate parental rights in very specific and dire circumstances.

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Yes. She can petition to terminate the father's parental rights. The court will render a decision after reviewing the evidence presented.

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If you sign over your parental rights in a court of law...you must go back and petition the court to regain your parental rights.

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You have 2 choices; Write up a document saying that he wishes to give you full rights, and he signs it, with 2 other witnesses signing, or go to a judge, and get him to endorse a legal document, but remember, once this is done, you are no longer entitled to any child support. * The biological parent wishing voluntarily relinquish rights to a child must file a petition for the Termination of Parental Rights in the circuit court of jurisdiction. The procedure must be done through the court and must be granted by the presiding judge, the decision will be made only on what is in the best interest of the child not on the preference of either parent. In most states TPR is granted by the court to allow a child to be eligible for adoption by a parent's new spouse.

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A motion to terminate rights with the family court system, but there's needs to significant evidence warranting this decision, and the mother must not be on welfare. see link

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You can't be emancipated from just one parent. This situation would not be an emancipation issue, it's a custody issue. Dad would have to petition the court for a change of custody (unless Mom is willing to voluntarily relinquish custody to him). If you're a teenager (and I assume you are) then you would be given the chance to tell the court who you would prefer to live with. The court makes the final decision, but they will take your wishes, along with many other things, into consideration when making that decision.


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