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Answered 2014-11-20 03:15:41

A person cannot sue their spouse for breach of marriage contract. They can however sue them for divorce and end the contract of marriage.

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You can sue the other party. It would be a civil case for breach of contract.


You can sue the state of Indiana for breach of privacy depending on the circumstances of the breach. For example, if you had a contract with a specific state agency that guaranteed you privacy and this contract was broken, then you could sue for breach of privacy.


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No. Only intended beneficiaries and contract parties can sue for breach of contract.



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The cosigner did not have a contract with the primary borrower, only with the lender; that being the case the cosigner would sue for his or her financial losses not for a breach of contract.


It will be dependent on the type of contract. Some verbal agreements can be enforced.



They have 2 years under the statute of limitations to sue for a breach of contract. The SoL begins running from the point the breach occurs.


Whether or not you can sue your husband for an STD depends greatly on where you live. If you get an STD from your spouse, you can sue for negligence, emotional distress, battery, and breach of contract.


Typically the breach must be cured. If it is not resolved within a specific period of time, the other party may find alternatives and sue for breach.


Generally, you can't have anybody arrested for a breach of contract. The usual remedy is to sue for damages in a civil action.


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If the provision of advance payment is there in the policy bond, you are at liberty to sue the Insurance Company for breach of contract.


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A breach by anticipatory (anticipatary breach) is an uniquivocal indication that the party will not perform when perfomance is due or situtation in which future non-performance is in-evitable. An anticipatory breach gives the non-breaching party the option to treat such a breach as immediate and if repudiatory to terminate the contract and sue for damages (without waiting for the breach to actually take place. Other kinds of breach: Material breach. Fundamental breach. Minor breach. - krithika


Yes. Typically there are three instances in which you can sue an attorney for malpractice: negligence, breach of fiducuary duty, breach of contract. And like any lawsuit you need to prove the elements of your claim in order to prevail which requires a showing of duty, breach, causation, and damages.


Basically that is what a divorce is. So, get a divorce.


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If the breach resulted in rent being owed, then yes, the landlord can use the deposit to pay that arrearage (and then sue for the rest).