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Painting and Watercolors

Can you use paint thinner in acrylic paint?

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2012-04-16 02:29:53
2012-04-16 02:29:53

Paint thinner is nearly alwys used in oil based paints. If you mix it with mosts acrylic paint the paints it will be ruined - unless of course you have a solvent based acrylic - such as a thermoplastic acrylic.

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Yes. you can use paint thinner to clean acrylic paint brushes.But it is better to use brush cleaner then paint thinner.It really does get the job dune!

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Yes you can use acrylic paint to paint furniture

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Most acrylic paint is thinned with water. The instructions regarding this are on every paint can I've ever seen. They ALWAYS specify the cleanup liquids and thinner. - Be aware that the term 'acrylic' covers many types of paint.

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no we cant use thinner in wall paint bcoz thinner protect the iron meterials .

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Yes, oil paint will adhere to acrylic.

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Acrylic paint is very common these days.

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No, it won't work. Use regular paint thinner.

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Yes, you can put chalk pastels over acrylic paint. After acrylic paint is dry, you can use soft pastels over the paint so it won't crack.

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No, you use water to thin latex paint. Thinner is for oil based paint.

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If it's an oil base paint you use paint thinner. If it's latex you use water.

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You can use oil-based paint pens over acrylic IF the acrylic has not been applied too thickly. You can also use water-based paint pens. HOWEVER, you cannot use acrylic over oil. The difference in how these two mediums dry and cure can make the acrylic-over-oil crack.

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If you are trying to protect a design, use three coats of acrylic polyurethane. If you are trying to repaint a chair that has been coated with acrylic paint, use acrylic paint again.

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I need to paint my family room. I really wanted to use acrylic paint. Where can I buy it at?

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Acrylic paint and oil paint

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Acrylic is generally easier to shine so would be shinier but the most definite way to tell would be to get a dab of cellulose thinner and rub a cloth on it.

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How do you use any paint under another ? If you mean, can you paint acrylic OVER varnish, it depends exactly what kind of acrylic. - Many will not work over varnish.

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Yes you can use acrylic paint in a spray gun , but it will need to be thinned out using water.

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Use a thinner for that paint, or just lacquer thinner if you're not sure.

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Yes, you can use acrylic paint on wooden doors. If there is any peeling paint on the door, you can remove it with sandpaper or a scraper. Also be sure to use exterior acrylic paint if you are painting an exterior door.

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There are many reasons you would need to use paint thinner while on the job. The main reason that you would use paint thinner on the job is if you were going to repaint something and needed to remove the old paint first.

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You can use acrylic paint on plastic provided you prepare the surface first. Before you begin painting you will have to prime it with paint that is suitable for plastic, such as an enamel paint. Once you have finished painting with the acrylic paint, the project will need a top coat.

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paint thinner is basically paint thinner

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The binder of the acrylic paint is called "acrylic polymer emulsion," and it can be found in different forms, which can be referred to as the "acrylic mediums". The easiest way to make acrylic paint is to use Aqua - Dispersions of Pigments, which are completely ready to use when you buy them. Acrylic paint is fast drying that contains pigment suspension in acrylic polymer emulsion. This type of paint can be diluted with but are resistant to water when they dry. A finished acrylic paint can resemble an oil or water colour painting depending on how much the painting is diluted or modified with acrylic gels or pastes.


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