Olympics

Did gladiators take part in the ancient Olympic games?

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2010-03-15 09:15:25
2010-03-15 09:15:25

no, the gladiators were roman the Olympics were Greek

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No. The marathon wasn't part of the ancient games.


no they were not allowed to take part in the olympic games until 1900


The gladiatorial games, together with the chariot races, was the most popular form of entertainment in Rome. Successful gladiators were popular heroes.



Ancient Greece or Rome I think it was part of the olympic games eventually


No, they had their own religious ceremonies.


It varies nowadays. The ancient games were not between countries as we understand them today.


only babies and twats in skirts :L




The Olympic Games began in 776 bc as part of a festival to the god Zeus.The emperor Theodosius I legally abolished the games in 393 or 394 A.D.


No women, no slaves were alowed to take part in the ancient Olympic Games.


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The gladiators lived in the gladiatorial schools. Gladiatorial games persisted throughout the days if the ancient Romans, even though the Christian emperors of the later Roman Empire repeatedly banned them


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Well, firstly, they were nude in the Ancient, there were no medals (different prizes), their was completely different sports (chariot racing), only Greek cities took part, not countries, and only men were allowed to take part.


Greeks did not have gladiators. This was a Roman custom, which originated in having gladiators fight as part of funeral celebrations for kings and nobles.


Individual entries - had to be a citizen of a Greek city-state.


Citizens from all the over 2,000 Greek city-states were eligible..


There are 246 taking part in the olympic


The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.The roman gladiators slept in the barracks which were part of their school.


No part of America invented athletics.Athletics were invented (or first recorded as a competitive event) in ancient Greece, the most famous event being the Ancient Olympic games.


They were held at Olympia in Elis in southern Greece, because the games were part of a religious festival in honour of Zeus at his temple there.


Ice hockey first became a part of the Olympic games in 1920 at the summer Olympics. It was transformed permanently to the winter Olympic games in 1924.


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