Taxes and Tax Preparation
Income Taxes

Do you have to pay taxes on a 401k if you take the money out to reinvest in a home?

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2009-01-15 17:30:45
2009-01-15 17:30:45

Because the money in your 401(k) has never been subject to income tax, all withdrawals for any reason will be taxed as ordinary income. Furthermore, if you take a premature (generally, under age 59 1/2) distribution from your 401(k) to purchase a home, the distribution will additionally be subject to a 10% penalty tax. You make take an early distribution of up to $10,000 from an IRA to pay qualified acquisition costs to purchase, build, or rebuild a first home without incurring the 10% penalty tax. The distribution will still be subject to income tax. http://www.irs.gov/publications/p590/ch01.html#d0e8323 If you purchased a home for your principal residence after April 8, 2008 and before July 1, 2009, you may be eligible for a First Time Home Buyer Tax Credit of up to $7,500 for your 2008 tax return. To be eligible for the credit, you must not have owned a home as a principal residence in the previous 3 years. http://www.efile.com/tax-deduction/income-deduction/home-deductions.asp

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