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Answered 2012-12-10 21:50:21

No. If you are not married the mother have custody automatically since birth. The only way for the father to get it is by proving paternity in court and he can then petition for custody, visitation and pay child support. Until then he can not stop her and the child form leaving.

If you are married she can also leave with the child and so could you since you both have equal right to the child then.

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Can a father who has joint custody with the mother stop her from visiting another state with the child


yes she is in my pants, and she is doin the heck out of me. RENa'


Yes, unless there is a custody agreement in order. Neither mother or father has custody legally.


IT DEPEND ON IF THE FATHER IS SHARING CUSTODY.


Without a Will, he has no clearly defined custodial rights to a stepchild, but unless addressed in a custody decree, neither does the father. Guardianship reverts to the maternal grandparents.


he has the right to fight for custody of the child involved but in the end depending on the situation the mother would be granted soul custody unless the mother is less fit than the father to raise the child


Generally, the order stands until there has been a significant change in circumstances that warrant another review by the court. In order to obtain primary custody the father would need to provide evidence that "primary" custody of the father would be in the best interest of the child and the present arrangement is not.Generally, the order stands until there has been a significant change in circumstances that warrant another review by the court. In order to obtain primary custody the father would need to provide evidence that "primary" custody of the father would be in the best interest of the child and the present arrangement is not.Generally, the order stands until there has been a significant change in circumstances that warrant another review by the court. In order to obtain primary custody the father would need to provide evidence that "primary" custody of the father would be in the best interest of the child and the present arrangement is not.Generally, the order stands until there has been a significant change in circumstances that warrant another review by the court. In order to obtain primary custody the father would need to provide evidence that "primary" custody of the father would be in the best interest of the child and the present arrangement is not.


I would say yes as long he is the biological father,and neither of them have any "strikes" against them concerning the welfare of the child in question,or any other child.





If you have Joint Legal Custody, then neither parent can physically change residences without the approval of the other. If, per the question, the daughter is living with the father, or the father has "primary" custody, then you can move wherever "you" want, at least in my perception.


The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.


Get the court's blessing for this, beginning with establishment of paternity.


The mother automatically have custody from birth and the father can petition for custody, visitation and also pay child support after he has proved paternity in court by providing a DNA test. As long as the mother is fit he will get shared custody at the most.


Shouldn't the question be, "How do I take his kids away from their father?" They are just as much his as yours. File for bird next custody. see link below


The father would be the favored person to get legal custody if the mother had custody and died unless he was found to be unfit to have custody.


The unmarried mother has sole custody and control in every state at the time of the birth until the father establishes his paternity in the family court.


No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.


If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.


If the parents share custody there must be a custody order and visitation order. Those orders must be followed. Neither party has the right to make changes without a new court order.



The assumption here is that a husband, in the process of a divorce, has filed for custody and the mother is countering it by claiming that he is not the father. She can do this.


Joint custody is between two parents, which are usually a mother and a father.