answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2011-03-18 15:13:04
2011-03-18 15:13:04

Unless the daughter is still living with her mother, the father might be able to get the court to terminate support on the grounds that the daughter is emancipated.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Yes, in some states you do need permission from your daughters father who you were never married to, to take your daughter on vacation to another state.


Ask the woman first to see if she even wants to get married, then go to her father for his permission.


If she is married, no. If she is unmarried, yes.


I think she can, than go after him for support once she moves, she is the bread winner


If he has court orders, than yes. Without orders, a single father cannot. A married father can, if custody has not yet been established.


If she is virgin then yes, she needs the permission of her father or paternal grandfather. If she is NOT virgin, then she does not need the permission of her father or paternal grandfather.


usually its the womans father that gives permission for the daughter to get married. Not the mans mother. But it shouldn't matter what anyone thinks anyway. If you love each other and want to get married, you shouldn't have to have permission specially if you are of age. A marriage is easier tho when you can get along with the in-laws. So maybe get to know her.. and see where it goes from there.



A biological father is the father of the child. A step-father is not. If the step-father has legally adopted the child that is not his when married then yes, he would have to pay support. If not married and the child is not his then no, he does not have to pay child support, but he may have to go to court to resolve the matter.




yes, i believe so. If the father gives permission for the child to change the last name.


if i am prenant and et married at sixteen to the babys father could i move in with him with out my paents permission in the state off Georgia?


No, when married the minor becomes emancipated.


If the father is not married to the mother your mum doesn't have to pay a single penny


No the child support starts after you have divorced him. As long as you are married you share everything so what ever he makes is yours. If you mean while you are married to someone else, yes it can. If you are married to but separated from the child's father, with or without a court order, you can receive child support from him.



now that you are married to the father of your child he doesn't pay child support but pays no gives more money to support yours and his child and running the household. good luck


A childs mother must file a petition for child support in the local family court.


Yes. The father is responsible for child support whether or not the parents were ever married. It is the biological connection that creates the legal obligation to support a child.Yes. The father is responsible for child support whether or not the parents were ever married. It is the biological connection that creates the legal obligation to support a child.Yes. The father is responsible for child support whether or not the parents were ever married. It is the biological connection that creates the legal obligation to support a child.Yes. The father is responsible for child support whether or not the parents were ever married. It is the biological connection that creates the legal obligation to support a child.



The parents of the child are liable for support - not their spouses.


Abraham married his half sister Sarah. Gen:20:12: And yet indeed she is my sister; she is the daughter of my father, but not the daughter of my mother; and she became my wife.


If the parents were married at the time of birth - possibly.


No. The father of the pregnant daughter has no legal obligation to support her child. That responsibility belongs to the biological father of the unborn child assuming that the pregnancy is not terminated nor the child placed for adoption or parental rights terminated by the court.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.