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Time is not a factor, speed is velocity and velocity equates to kinetic energy.

E=Mass * Velocity squared.

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13y ago
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7y ago

No. Kinetic energy depends on SPEED and on MASS.

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7y ago

No, it is (they are) not.

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Q: Does kinetic energy increase with speed and time?
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How do you find mean kinetic energy when given only mass and horizontal distance traveled?

You don't have enough information in this case. Kinetic energy depends on mass and speed. Speed can be calculated as distance / time - and no time is given, nor is there any other information that allows you to calculate the time. Note that even if time is given, you can calculate the average (mean) speed, but that will only give you a rough idea of the mean kinetic energy. In this problem, if the speed changes a lot, the average kinetic energy (averaged over time) will be greater than in the case of a constant speed. This is because kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the speed.


How do you find the speed with mass and kinetic energy?

|v| = sqrt( 2 * KE / m ), with |v| being speed.


Does kinetic energy actually increase the speed of an object?

Gaining kinetic energy 'E' amounts to saying that the momentum of an object increases. E = p^2 / 2m where p is momentum and m is mass. (Momentum is just mass times speed.) So, to increase the speed the kinetic energy has to change. In other words, if you set the kinetic energy to any value you like and keep it constant, there won't be a speed up. What is the change in kinetic energy? You can just as well ask what is the change in momentum. Physicists have chosen the latter question and call the change in momentum 'the force'. F = dp / dt where F is force and d/dt means derivation with respect to time. It is the pushing force acting on objects that makes them gain speed. Kinetic energy is usually something that you calculate at the end when you have found out what the forces in your problem are and what the momentum is as a function of time.


Is an increase in kinetic energy directly proportional to the time it takes for an object to fall slash distance it falls?

The kinetic energy of a falling object is directly proportional to the distance it falls.But the distance is not directly proportional to the time in fall, so the KE is not directly proportionalto the time either.


What is he relationship between temperature and kinetic energy?

Consider the example that you have a iron rod you start hearting one end by burner and after some time you will find that the whole iron rod is uniformly heated. First of all, when you give heat to anything the atoms constituting it will get energy and hence excited atoms oscillate (kinetic energy) and thus this process is transferred from atoms to atoms consecutively (atomes from one of the rod to the atoms at the other end) and thus heat is uniformly distributed on the whole iron rod.

Related questions

As mass decreases does kinetic energy increase?

That depends on what is happening to the speed at the same time, since kinetic energy depends on both mass and speed. If the speed doesn't change, then less mass implies less kinetic energy. You might suspect that it works this way. If it worked the other way around, then you'd rather be hit by a truck than be hit by a speeding speck of dust.


How do you find mean kinetic energy when given only mass and horizontal distance traveled?

You don't have enough information in this case. Kinetic energy depends on mass and speed. Speed can be calculated as distance / time - and no time is given, nor is there any other information that allows you to calculate the time. Note that even if time is given, you can calculate the average (mean) speed, but that will only give you a rough idea of the mean kinetic energy. In this problem, if the speed changes a lot, the average kinetic energy (averaged over time) will be greater than in the case of a constant speed. This is because kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the speed.


How do you find the speed with mass and kinetic energy?

|v| = sqrt( 2 * KE / m ), with |v| being speed.


Are Speed and Response time could be kinetic energy?

No. Speed, time, and energy are three quite different units.No. Speed, time, and energy are three quite different units.No. Speed, time, and energy are three quite different units.No. Speed, time, and energy are three quite different units.


Should a large truck and a small car moving at the same speed have the same kinetic energy?

No. The large truck has more kinetic energy than the car. Mass is a variable in the equation for determining kinetic energy. Kinetic energy equals 1/2 the mass of the object time the speed (really velocity) squared.


Does kinetic energy actually increase the speed of an object?

Gaining kinetic energy 'E' amounts to saying that the momentum of an object increases. E = p^2 / 2m where p is momentum and m is mass. (Momentum is just mass times speed.) So, to increase the speed the kinetic energy has to change. In other words, if you set the kinetic energy to any value you like and keep it constant, there won't be a speed up. What is the change in kinetic energy? You can just as well ask what is the change in momentum. Physicists have chosen the latter question and call the change in momentum 'the force'. F = dp / dt where F is force and d/dt means derivation with respect to time. It is the pushing force acting on objects that makes them gain speed. Kinetic energy is usually something that you calculate at the end when you have found out what the forces in your problem are and what the momentum is as a function of time.


A 0.5kg basketball is lifted 5m and thrown straight ahead with a speed of 2 ms What is the Kinetic Energy of the basketball?

At the time of the throw: Kinetic energy = 0.5*mass*(speed)^2 = 0.5*0.5*4 = 1J. There is also the potential energy at the time of the throw. If you want to know the kinetic energy at the time the ball hits the ground, that term must be added: Potential energy (with respect to the ground) at the time of throw = mass*gravity*height = 0.5*9.8*0.5 = 2.45 J.


When the speed of an object doubles does its kinetic energy double too?

Answer: Speed is distance over time (V=x/t). The kinetic energy of an object is calculated from the type KE=1/2mass by Speed squared. From these two formulas we can see that if the speed doubles, then the kinetic energy of an object becomes four times larger. Lets see an example: A car has a speed of 4 metres per second. Its kinetic energy is KE=1/2mass by speed squared, so its KE=1/2mass by 16 (since the square of 4 is 16). If the speed doubles and the car does 8 metres per second, its kinetic energy is: KE=1/2mass by 64 (since 8 squared gives us 64). If we divide 64/16 its 4. So we see that when speed doubles, the Kinetic Energy of an object becomes four times larger.


Is an increase in kinetic energy directly proportional to the time it takes for an object to fall slash distance it falls?

The kinetic energy of a falling object is directly proportional to the distance it falls.But the distance is not directly proportional to the time in fall, so the KE is not directly proportionalto the time either.


Where do observe kinetic energy?

Any time anything moves, there is kinetic energy involved.


What is he relationship between temperature and kinetic energy?

Consider the example that you have a iron rod you start hearting one end by burner and after some time you will find that the whole iron rod is uniformly heated. First of all, when you give heat to anything the atoms constituting it will get energy and hence excited atoms oscillate (kinetic energy) and thus this process is transferred from atoms to atoms consecutively (atomes from one of the rod to the atoms at the other end) and thus heat is uniformly distributed on the whole iron rod.


A moving object must have potential energy?

An object that has kinetic energy must have momentum, velocity, and speed. Momentum is mass times velocity. Kinetic energy is mass times velocity squared. Speed is distance divided by time. Kinetic energy is the energy of the object's motion. An object that has kinetic energy must have momentum because is the force or speed of movement. For example the ball gained momentum as it rolled down the hill. An object that has kinetic energy must have momentum, velocity, and speed because if an object is in motion (has kinetic energy) it must be either gaining, losing, or at a constant momentum, it must have a velocity (basically speed) and speed because when an object is in motion, it MUST have a certain velocity or speed.