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Lincoln was super cool. so he said "you shall expand!"

and that's how it happened! (:

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Q: Federal government power expand civil war?
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Related questions

What did the civil war do in relation to the power of the federal government?

The Civil War increased the power of the Federal government.


Why is the Necessary and proper clause in the constitution?

expand the power of the federal government.


The necessary and proper clause of the Constitution has been used to?

expand the power of the federal government.


What power did the civil war question?

The Civil War raised the question of states' rights. The power of the federal government to make laws affecting the states and territories, and the power of the federal government to force states to remain in the union, were key ideas.


Was the Whiskey Rebellion was a civil uprising against the taxing power of the federal government?

yes


During the Civil War which side wanted to limit the power of the federal government?

The South.


Was the whiskey rebellion a civil uprising against the taxing power of the federal government?

yes


What clause allowed federal government to expand its power?

elastic clause


How did the civil war change the balance of power between state government and federal government?

The event that the Civil War had the federal government was the Secession of the Southern States.


The power relationship that changed most as a result of the Civil War was the increase in the power of the?

Federal government over the states


How has the civil rights act of 1964 increased the power of the federal government?

The civil rights act of 1964 allowed the federal government to dictate private actions. The government could tell private businesses they had no right to exclude minorities.


What did the civil war decide?

The power of the Federal Government versus States Rights and the issue of slavery.