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Genetic Engineering

Form shape ear lobe genetic?

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Wiki User
March 04, 2014 4:38PM

23andMe researchers found several genetic variants associated with attached and unattached earlobes. Whether your earlobes dangle with your earrings or are attached has a genetic association. Researchers found six distinct genetic variants that contribute to this trait. Based on customer survey data, people of European ancestry with the less common versions of rs7739444 (T), rs1035150 (T), rs2804344 (T), rs12691702 (G), and rs453609 (G) had lower odds of unattached earlobes. Those with the A version of rs11013962, on the other hand, had higher odds of unattached earlobes. Learn more at 23andme.com.

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September 13, 2011 3:04AM

Looking at child's earlobes is the only 100per cent indication apart from a DNA test to determine paternity of a child.

If both parents have attached earlobes then the child will definitely inherit these. if they both have detatched "dangly" earlobes then the child will inherit detatched ones. If one parent has attached and the other has detatched then the child can inherit either (although the attached earlobes are the more dominant gene so this would appear more likely). This is currently the most accurate way to determine a child's paternity other than taking a DNA sample.