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Genetic Engineering

Questions about the manipulation of an organisms genes in order to alter the morphological or chemical traits of the organism.

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What kind of classes will you have to take in college to be a genetic engineer?

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Asked by Guiltyverdict

Typically, the basic general courses particular to engineering - setting aside courses related to a specialty - would include: * English composition * General Chemistry I and II * Physics (Mechanics, electricity and magnetism) * Engineering and computer graphics * Fundamentals of engineering * Computer algorithms * Calculus I, II, III and differential equations * Macro and/or micro economics * Technical electives * Humanities and social science electives. The above typically fills out the general cluster leading to advanced coursework particular to a specialty. The below relates to more detailed general information related to engineering that you should carefully read over, and follow through with the link I have provided below this answer box. The following is from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Engineers typically enter the occupation with a bachelor's degree in an engineering specialty, but some basic research positions may require a graduate degree. Engineers offering their services directly to the public must be licensed. Continuing education to keep current with rapidly changing technology is important for engineers. Education and training. A bachelor's degree in engineering is required for almost all entry-level engineering jobs. College graduates with a degree in a natural science or mathematics occasionally may qualify for some engineering jobs, especially in specialties in high demand. Most engineering degrees are granted in electrical, electronics, mechanical, or civil engineering. However, engineers trained in one branch may work in related branches. For example, many aerospace engineers have training in mechanical engineering. This flexibility allows employers to meet staffing needs in new technologies and specialties in which engineers may be in short supply. It also allows engineers to shift to fields with better employment prospects or to those that more closely match their interests. Most engineering programs involve a concentration of study in an engineering specialty, along with courses in both mathematics and the physical and life sciences. Many programs also include courses in general engineering. A design course, sometimes accompanied by a computer or laboratory class or both, is part of the curriculum of most programs. General courses not directly related to engineering, such as those in the social sciences or humanities, are also often required. In addition to the standard engineering degree, many colleges offer 2-year or 4-year degree programs in engineering technology. These programs, which usually include various hands-on laboratory classes that focus on current issues in the application of engineering principles, prepare students for practical design and production work, rather than for jobs that require more theoretical and scientific knowledge. Graduates of 4-year technology programs may get jobs similar to those obtained by graduates with a bachelor's degree in engineering. Engineering technology graduates, however, are not qualified to register as professional engineers under the same terms as graduates with degrees in engineering. Some employers regard technology program graduates as having skills between those of a technician and an engineer. Graduate training is essential for engineering faculty positions and many research and development programs, but is not required for the majority of entry-level engineering jobs. Many experienced engineers obtain graduate degrees in engineering or business administration to learn new technology and broaden their education. Many high-level executives in government and industry began their careers as engineers. About 1,830 programs at colleges and universities offer bachelor's degrees in engineering that are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), Inc., and there are another 710 accredited programs in engineering technology. ABET accreditation is based on a program's faculty, curriculum, and facilities; the achievement of a program's students; program improvements; and institutional commitment to specific principles of quality and ethics. Although most institutions offer programs in the major branches of engineering, only a few offer programs in the smaller specialties. Also, programs of the same title may vary in content. For example, some programs emphasize industrial practices, preparing students for a job in industry, whereas others are more theoretical and are designed to prepare students for graduate work. Therefore, students should investigate curriculums and check accreditations carefully before selecting a college. Admissions requirements for undergraduate engineering schools include a solid background in mathematics (algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus) and science (biology, chemistry, and physics), with courses in English, social studies, and humanities. Bachelor's degree programs in engineering typically are designed to last 4 years, but many students find that it takes between 4 and 5 years to complete their studies. In a typical 4-year college curriculum, the first 2 years are spent studying mathematics, basic sciences, introductory engineering, humanities, and social sciences. In the last 2 years, most courses are in engineering, usually with a concentration in one specialty. Some programs offer a general engineering curriculum; students then specialize on the job or in graduate school. Some engineering schools have agreements with 2-year colleges whereby the college provides the initial engineering education, and the engineering school automatically admits students for their last 2 years. In addition, a few engineering schools have arrangements that allow students who spend 3 years in a liberal arts college studying pre-engineering subjects and 2 years in an engineering school studying core subjects to receive a bachelor's degree from each school. Some colleges and universities offer 5-year master's degree programs. Some 5-year or even 6-year cooperative plans combine classroom study and practical work, permitting students to gain valuable experience and to finance part of their education. Licensure. All 50 States and the District of Columbia require licensure for engineers who offer their services directly to the public. Engineers who are licensed are called professional engineers (PE). This licensure generally requires a degree from an ABET-accredited engineering program, 4 years of relevant work experience, and successful completion of a State examination. Recent graduates can start the licensing process by taking the examination in two stages. The initial Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination can be taken upon graduation. Engineers who pass this examination commonly are called engineers in training (EIT) or engineer interns (EI). After acquiring suitable work experience, EITs can take the second examination, the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam. Several States have imposed mandatory continuing education requirements for relicensure. Most States recognize licensure from other States, provided that the manner in which the initial license was obtained meets or exceeds their own licensure requirements. Many civil, electrical, mechanical, and chemical engineers are licensed PEs. Independent of licensure, various certification programs are offered by professional organizations to demonstrate competency in specific fields of engineering. Other qualifications.Engineers should be creative, inquisitive, analytical, and detail oriented. They should be able to work as part of a team and to communicate well, both orally and in writing. Communication abilities are becoming increasingly important as engineers frequently interact with specialists in a wide range of fields outside engineering. Certification and advancement.Beginning engineering graduates usually work under the supervision of experienced engineers and, in large companies, also may receive formal classroom or seminar-type training. As new engineers gain knowledge and experience, they are assigned more difficult projects with greater independence to develop designs, solve problems, and make decisions. Engineers may advance to become technical specialists or to supervise a staff or team of engineers and technicians. Some may eventually become engineering managers or enter other managerial or sales jobs. In sales, an engineering background enables them to discuss a product's technical aspects and assist in product planning, installation, and use. (See the statements under management and business and financial operations occupations, and the statement on sales engineers elsewhere in the Handbook.) Numerous professional certifications for engineers exist and may be beneficial for advancement to senior technical or managerial positions. Many certification programs are offered by the professional societies listed as sources of additional information for engineering specialties at the end of this statement.

Engineers typically enter the occupation with a bachelor's degree in an engineering specialty, but some basic research positions may require a graduate degree. Engineers offering their services directly to the public must be licensed. Continuing education to keep current with rapidly changing technology is important for engineers. Education and training. A bachelor's degree in engineering is required for almost all entry-level engineering jobs. College graduates with a degree in a natural science or mathematics occasionally may qualify for some engineering jobs, especially in specialties in high demand. Most engineering degrees are granted in electrical, electronics, mechanical, or civil engineering. However, engineers trained in one branch may work in related branches. For example, many aerospace engineers have training in mechanical engineering. This flexibility allows employers to meet staffing needs in new technologies and specialties in which engineers may be in short supply. It also allows engineers to shift to fields with better employment prospects or to those that more closely match their interests. Most engineering programs involve a concentration of study in an engineering specialty, along with courses in both mathematics and the physical and life sciences. Many programs also include courses in general engineering. A design course, sometimes accompanied by a computer or laboratory class or both, is part of the curriculum of most programs. General courses not directly related to engineering, such as those in the social sciences or humanities, are also often required. In addition to the standard engineering degree, many colleges offer 2-year or 4-year degree programs in engineering technology. These programs, which usually include various hands-on laboratory classes that focus on current issues in the application of engineering principles, prepare students for practical design and production work, rather than for jobs that require more theoretical and scientific knowledge. Graduates of 4-year technology programs may get jobs similar to those obtained by graduates with a bachelor's degree in engineering. Engineering technology graduates, however, are not qualified to register as professional engineers under the same terms as graduates with degrees in engineering. Some employers regard technology program graduates as having skills between those of a technician and an engineer. Graduate training is essential for engineering faculty positions and many research and development programs, but is not required for the majority of entry-level engineering jobs. Many experienced engineers obtain graduate degrees in engineering or business administration to learn new technology and broaden their education. Many high-level executives in government and industry began their careers as engineers. About 1,830 programs at colleges and universities offer bachelor's degrees in engineering that are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), Inc., and there are another 710 accredited programs in engineering technology. ABET accreditation is based on a program's faculty, curriculum, and facilities; the achievement of a program's students; program improvements; and institutional commitment to specific principles of quality and ethics. Although most institutions offer programs in the major branches of engineering, only a few offer programs in the smaller specialties. Also, programs of the same title may vary in content. For example, some programs emphasize industrial practices, preparing students for a job in industry, whereas others are more theoretical and are designed to prepare students for graduate work. Therefore, students should investigate curriculums and check accreditations carefully before selecting a college. Admissions requirements for undergraduate engineering schools include a solid background in mathematics (algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus) and science (biology, chemistry, and physics), with courses in English, social studies, and humanities. Bachelor's degree programs in engineering typically are designed to last 4 years, but many students find that it takes between 4 and 5 years to complete their studies. In a typical 4-year college curriculum, the first 2 years are spent studying mathematics, basic sciences, introductory engineering, humanities, and social sciences. In the last 2 years, most courses are in engineering, usually with a concentration in one specialty. Some programs offer a general engineering curriculum; students then specialize on the job or in graduate school. Some engineering schools have agreements with 2-year colleges whereby the college provides the initial engineering education, and the engineering school automatically admits students for their last 2 years. In addition, a few engineering schools have arrangements that allow students who spend 3 years in a liberal arts college studying pre-engineering subjects and 2 years in an engineering school studying core subjects to receive a bachelor's degree from each school. Some colleges and universities offer 5-year master's degree programs. Some 5-year or even 6-year cooperative plans combine classroom study and practical work, permitting students to gain valuable experience and to finance part of their education. Licensure. All 50 States and the District of Columbia require licensure for engineers who offer their services directly to the public. Engineers who are licensed are called professional engineers (PE). This licensure generally requires a degree from an ABET-accredited engineering program, 4 years of relevant work experience, and successful completion of a State examination. Recent graduates can start the licensing process by taking the examination in two stages. The initial Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination can be taken upon graduation. Engineers who pass this examination commonly are called engineers in training (EIT) or engineer interns (EI). After acquiring suitable work experience, EITs can take the second examination, the Principles and Practice of Engineering exam. Several States have imposed mandatory continuing education requirements for relicensure. Most States recognize licensure from other States, provided that the manner in which the initial license was obtained meets or exceeds their own licensure requirements. Many civil, electrical, mechanical, and chemical engineers are licensed PEs. Independent of licensure, various certification programs are offered by professional organizations to demonstrate competency in specific fields of engineering. Other qualifications.Engineers should be creative, inquisitive, analytical, and detail oriented. They should be able to work as part of a team and to communicate well, both orally and in writing. Communication abilities are becoming increasingly important as engineers frequently interact with specialists in a wide range of fields outside engineering. Certification and advancement.Beginning engineering graduates usually work under the supervision of experienced engineers and, in large companies, also may receive formal classroom or seminar-type training. As new engineers gain knowledge and experience, they are assigned more difficult projects with greater independence to develop designs, solve problems, and make decisions. Engineers may advance to become technical specialists or to supervise a staff or team of engineers and technicians. Some may eventually become engineering managers or enter other managerial or sales jobs. In sales, an engineering background enables them to discuss a product's technical aspects and assist in product planning, installation, and use. (See the statements under management and business and financial operations occupations, and the statement on sales engineers elsewhere in the Handbook.) Numerous professional certifications for engineers exist and may be beneficial for advancement to senior technical or managerial positions. Many certification programs are offered by the professional societies listed as sources of additional information for engineering specialties at the end of this statement. For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box.

What is a genetic trait?

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Asked by Wiki User

A trait is an observable, physical characteristic of an organism (a phenotype). A FACTOR is the underlying genetic cause of the TRAIT (the genotype).

How do you get rid of love handles without getting skinnier?

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Asked by Wiki User

Spot exercises won't work. I'm not one to recommend surgery but liposuction sounds like an option.

Which form of anemia is a genetic disorder?

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Asked by Wiki User

It sounds like you are looking for Sickle Cell Anemia.

How can genetic diseases miss a generation?

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Asked by Supersable

Where the gene(s) is/are recessive, a person might also end up with a dominant gene that masks it while then passing it on to any of their own children, who may then be unlucky enough to receive both alleles of the recessive disease gene(s). This makes it possible for the disease to skip mutliple generations and then reappear suddenly for a long time, or to simply miss every second or third.

Is colorblindness genetic?

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Asked by Wiki User

Yes. It is a sex-linked recessive trait found on the X chromosome.

How often does Tay-Sachs disease occur?

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Asked by Wiki User

The defective gene that causes Tay-Sachs disease is found in roughly 1 in 250 people in the general population.

How can genetic engineering improve cystic fibrosis?

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Asked by Wiki User

They isolated functional CFTR gene. Then they inserted the CFTR gene into nondisease-causing adenovirus virus. Last, they infected the patient´s airway cells with virus carryinhg the healthy CFTR gene.

The genetic disorder sickle-cell anemia is an example of?

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Asked by Wiki User

Well, its a genetic disorder that is most common among African Americans. It is when red blood cells are C shaped. It's an example of a problem

It is an example of pleiotropy.

What is the similarities between prokaryotic and eukaryotic?

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Asked by Wiki User

There is a theory. This theory states that mitochondria and chloroplasts were once a free living bacterias(prokaryote) long time ago. People thought this because mitochondria and chloroplasts are not like other organelles of the cell. They divide independently during cell division, they both have their own DNA, and even those DNAs (known as mtDNA) replicates.

What is Barbara McClintock's famous for?

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Asked by Wiki User

Short Biography on Barbara McClintock

Birth- June 16th, 1902 in Hartfrod, Connecticut.

Death- September 2nd, 1992 (age 90) in Huntington, New York.

School- University of Missouri, Cold Spring Harbor Labratory, Cornell University.

Degree- PhD in botary from Cornell University in 1927.

Career- in genetic structure of maize.

Awards- Noble Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1983.

Family- thrid child out of four, born to Thomas Henry and Sara Handy McClintock

Quote- "I cannot fight for myself, but I can fight for others".

Can you clone a Clone Trooper?

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Asked by Wiki User

no there just cant jango fett was a guy and the clones are clones of him so they would be like him duh this was way back in the long long time ago era so no one cared about a fetus they just created clones but if there did happen to be a female clone they wouldn't use her because she would be structuarly imbalenced because she is supposed to be a guy. So there

Female Jango clone: (answer improvement / correction)

Sure there could be a female Jango clone. Male genome is XY. Female genome is XX. If you wanted to make a female clone of Jango Fett there are a couple of ways you could do it.

First of all - basic cloning 101 - You take a cell that has all it's organelles, remove the nucleus that has the DNA and replace it with the DNA of your clone. Than you incubate this cell into an organism. Dolly the sheep was incubated in the womb of another sheep. Wa-la, a clone. I don't know if they used stem cells, gamete cells, skin cells or some other bodily cell to create Dolly.

So if the Kaminoans wanted to create a female Jango clone; all they'd have to do is separate the X from the Y, double copy the X (so the clone was XX instead of XY), implant this DNA in a host cell and bam - you have a female Jango clone.

The other way they could do it is use gamete cells. Than they wouldn't have to segregate the DNA. It would be easier. Take a donor egg cell; replace the nucleus with the DNA from an X sperm cell and fertilize that egg with another X sperm. Wa-la - female Jango clone. The only difference would be the cell organelles would have the messenger RNA of the female donor. If a female relative of Jango Fett was used as a egg donor - there wouldn't be a problem since we all get our messenger RNA from our mothers anyways.

Now if there was some genetic defect in Jango's X chromosome; it would show up in the female clone too. But than again if there was a defect in the X, it would also be present in the male clones since they only have one X.

So there you go - yes - you could have a female Jango clone trooper.

You can make female clones out of male hosts; you just couldn't go the other way - saving an act of God that is!

Will clone trooper denal die in the clone wars?

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Asked by Wiki User

I'm not sure yet, but iff you look at the Star wars the clone wars trailer for series two there's a quick snap of Cad Bane WEARING Denal's amour in a ship trying to get away. It's your opinion.

Really you need and wait and See for your self.

in cargo of doom you see sgt denal get on to the shuttle and he has a deeper voice so cad bane might be in in denals armor

Denal was mistaken for death and while the ship was blowing up he was shot in the right upper torso and fell he then ran and found an escape pod and landed on Courascant. Hope this helps. From what I know he lives.

Explain the evolutionary significance of a nearly universal genetic code?

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Asked by Wiki User

It is considered universal because all organisms use the same codon for the same amino acid.

Is anemia a genetic disorder?

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Asked by Wiki User

Anemia is a broad disorder that literally translates as 'no blood'. In medical practice, anemia is a condition in which there are insufficient normal red blood cells to provide oxygen to the body tissues.

Anemia can be caused by a wide variety of things: large volume blood loss, infection, cancer and toxins can all result in various types of anemia.

There are also genetic causes of anemia. Two commonly discussed genetic anemias are sickle cell anemia and hemophilia-related anemia. Sickle cell anemia developed in Africa, where malaria parasites are common. A heterozygous individual has about 15% abnormal red blood cells that are crescent-shaped and don't transport oxygen well. Hemophilia was traced to a point mutation in the English royal line in the Middle Ages, which then spread throughout Europe via marriage among the royal houses. Hemophilia actually results in blood that does not clot properly, which can result in anemia due to chronic blood loss through hemorrhages.

Is shyness genetic?

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Asked by Wiki User

It's possible. Your family members can influence you to become shy if they're the same way. I do believe there are traces of your parent's personality in you and it could include shyness.

Are you in favor to cloning?

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Asked by Wiki User

Cloning is an important part of advancing science. You have to ask yourself this question though...If you cloned yourself and had sexual relations with your clone, would you consider yourself gay?

Which compounds store genetic information?

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Asked by Wiki User

Nucleic acids the most common being DNA.

Why have we developed gm crops?

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Asked by Wiki User

To increase their resistance to disease and predation. To improve the yield. To allow crops to grow more quickly and in more adverse conditions. To reduce starvation in the world.

Bacterial DNA is used frequently in genetic engineering because?

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Asked by Wiki User

it is found in the cytoplasm as a simple circle.

Who discovered progeria?

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Asked by Wiki User

I got this from google. The first person was Jonathan Hutchin.