Genetic Diseases

A genetic disease or disorder is a condition caused by abnormal genes or chromosomes. Some of the more common genetic diseases are Angelman syndrome, celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, hemophilia, Klinefelter syndrome, sickle-cell disease, and Turner syndrome.

1,830 Questions
Child Health
Genetic Diseases

Does Orlando Bloom have Williams syndrome?

I'm gonna have to tell you NO.

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Biology
Genetic Engineering
Photosynthesis
Genetic Diseases

Why does chlorosis occur in plants?

Plants have chloroplasts which contain chlorophyll, and if there is decrease in chlorophyll due to less availability of magneseium or nitrogen in the soil, then this results in Chlorosis.

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Men's Health
Genetic Diseases
Klinefelter's Syndrome

Why is someone with klinefelters syndrome male not female?

By definition Klinefelter's syndrome is genetically XXY. If there is any Y chromosome present, the baby will develop into a boy.

Even if a baby had XXXXY, it would still turn out as a boy.

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Werewolves
Genetic Diseases

How does human werewolf syndrome affect people?

some people think it is cool but some people who have are really embarrased to go in front of people

like above,yes,some ppl think it would be awsome to be a werewolf,but we ARE embarresed to be around ppl,cause we feel unwanted,like ppl think were freaks.because we act different,and have different instincts.

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Parenting and Children
Genetic Diseases

Are children born to cousins deformed?

The risk of birth defects and congenital diseases increases the more closely related the parents are. Deformities, such as polydactylism (many fingers or toes) would be even more common in pairings of siblings than of first cousins, but the risk, while elevated, is not huge and is definitely not a certainty.

Many people have successfully had children with their first cousin. Charles Darwin married his first cousin, who bore him a number of children.

The practice is discouraged in some communities, but not in others.

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Women's Health
Conditions and Diseases
Genetic Diseases

What causes Potters Syndrome?

Generally it is the lack of loss of amniotic fluid in the womb. Amniotic fluid is used to nourish the foetus as well as provide safety so it does no bounce around everywhere. However, because there is a certain lack of this fluid, damage can be caused to the foetus.

Also, there has been a small link with genetic mutation but this has been ignored due to a lack of justification.

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Eyes
Genetic Diseases

What is the color of Joaquin Phoenix's eyes?

It may depend on what color photo is seen. In most of them Joaquin Phoenix's eyes look green. In some photo the color appears to be blue, a silvery blue. Note in stills and publicity shots for "Walk the Line" the actor wore brown eye contacts.

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Conditions and Diseases
Genetic Diseases

How many deaths have there been due to FOP disease?

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is an extremely rare genetic disorder -- only occurring in 1 out of 2 million people. Given its rarity, only a few thousand people have had it and have died from it.

See the related links section for a link to more information about FOP.

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Microbiology
Genetics
Genetic Engineering
Genetic Diseases

What is the most common fatal genetic disease in the US?

cystic fibrosis

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Men's Health
Genetic Diseases
Klinefelter's Syndrome

Who discovered Klinefelter syndrome?

Mr. Klinefelter

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Conditions and Diseases
Genetics
Genetic Diseases

How do you stop the pain of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobile type?

AnswerThe most effective medication that I have used is buprinorphene/piroxicam/naloxone compounded by a specialty pharmacy and prescribed by my physician.

You'll get a different answer to this question from everyone you ask. Pain Management is a complex field in medicine, using techniques and drugs from a variety of disciplines.

First, though, it is really important to be in a regular program of exercise and myofascial treatment. You may accomplish this through physical therapy, massage, chiropractic, exercise classes, personal training, etc. Your myofascial therapist (PT, massage, chiropractic) will help reduce any subluxations/dislocations that occur, identify muscles that need to be strengthened to stabilize your joints, and provide heat therapy, ultrasound therapy, cryotherapy, electric stimulation, or other methods to reduce pain.

Second, a specialist in pain management can help manage your overall treatment plan, particularly with medications, injection therapies, and other new treatment modalities. Prolotherapy is fairly commonly recommended in pain management circles for hypermobile joints; I had a really bad experience with prolo, but there are many others who have been helped significantly by it. Expect a pain management specialist to require you to sign a contract before receiving a prescription for any narcotic pain medications. Also expect a pain management specialist to recommend medications from anti-depressant and anti-convulsant families, as these can work directly on the nervous system to change your perceptions of chronic pain.

In all honesty, nothing will ever stop the chronic pain that results from joint hypermobility related to EDS. I'm currently on an amazing regimen that takes my baseline chronic pain level from an everyday 6 out of 10 to about 2 out of 10. In the last couple months, I have even experienced times when I've felt no pain at all. The acute subluxations/strains/sprains/whatever still hurt, and at the same levels as before, but it's a lot easier to live with these now than it was before.

I also recommend spending time on diaphragmatic-breathing and relaxation methods (especially relaxation CDs/MP3s), because these are things you can do for yourself when things are really bad.

Don't give up hope. You will grieve, and you will be angry, and you will be frustrated. You will tick off the people around you. You will be ticked off with your own body. But you are not alone, and there are ways to feel better. I promise.

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Genetic Diseases
Genetics

Is detached earlobes recessive or dominant?

Dominant.

he has a homozygous genotype

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Genetic Diseases

What is your life expectancy for jacobsen syndrome?

remains unknown

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Definitions
Biotechnology
Genetic Diseases

The terms gene and gene therapy?

Gene is the basic hereditary material...Gene therapy is the treatment which involves the replacement of diseased or defective tissues with healthy tissues..

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Conditions and Diseases
Autism
Infectious Diseases
Genetics
Genetic Diseases

Is an autistic disease a genetic disease?

Autism is not a disease full-stop.

Autism is a neurological variation, autism is no more a disease than being neurotypical is a disease and as we are our minds to refer to autism as a disease is to refer to Autistic people as a disease. Autism is believed to be genetic, it's not due to just one genetic mutation but multiple potential variations so even neurotypical people with no autism in the family can have Autistic children.

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Men's Health
Genetic Diseases
Klinefelter's Syndrome

How can you tell if you have Klinefelter's Syndrome?

The only way to be 100% sure if you have Klinefelter's syndrome is to get a genetic analysis done, but short of that you can compare yourself to the symptoms of a person with Klinefelter's to determine if you match that description. If you do match that description, then I would urge you contact your doctor to get a proper diagnosis.

Here are the more common symptoms occurring in Klinefelter's syndrome:

Infertility

Difficulty learning language

Deficits in cognitive executive functioning

Gynecomastia (male breast development)

Widened, rounded hips

Narrow shoulders

Tall, lanky build

Small testicles or small penis

Underdeveloped muscle mass

Little or no pubic, facial, or body hair

Decreased impulse control

Decreased ability to multi-task

Lengthened response time to a stimulus

Poor social skills

Increased risk for developing alcohol/drug abuse

Increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders

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Health
Men's Health
Genetic Diseases
Klinefelter's Syndrome

What is observed in a karyotype?

A karyotype is basically a chart of the number and structure of chromosomes. They can reveal ploidy differences (missing or additional chromosomes such as trisomy 21) or chromosomal mutations (like inversions, deletions, translocations etc)

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Biology
Genetics
Genetic Diseases

What does a half shaded circle or square indicate in a pedigree?

It indicates a carior , which possess a recessive gene for disease but no symptoms of disease .

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Science
Men's Health
Conditions and Diseases
Genetic Diseases
Klinefelter's Syndrome

What type of mutation causes Klinefelter's syndrome?

non-disjunction. Men with this syndrome have an extra X chromosome.

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Genetics
Genetic Engineering
Genetic Diseases

Describe three ways genetic diseases are caused?

1. (1) Produced by an abnormality in, or a mutation of the genetic code in a single gene; (2) Caused by several abnormal genes (Producing so-called polygenic diseases); or (3) Caused by the abnormal presence or absence of an entire chromosome or by alteration in the structure of chromosomes.

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Genetics
Genetic Diseases

What is a genetic disorder and a genetic disease?

A genetic disorder is an abnormal condition that a person inherits through genes or chromosomes.

an example is autism.

human being
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Men's Health
Genetic Diseases
Klinefelter's Syndrome

How can you get screened for Klinefelter Syndrome?

If you desire to get screened for Klinefelter's syndrome, talk to your doctor. Depending on the relationship they have with the local lab they can either order the test for you, or they can refer you to an endocrinologist, who can order the test for you. The basic ways the diagnosis will be made is a combination of physical exam, hormone analysis, and chromosomal analysis. (the bloodwork/test - it is called karyotype.

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Child Health
Genetic Diseases

Did Robin Williams have Asperger's Syndrome?

It was never officially announced that he had Asperger's Syndrome. He did, however, suffer from bipolar disorder and depression. In addition, he suffered from a lifetime of alcohol and drug addiction. Sadly, Robin Williams committed suicide in August 2014.

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Genetics
Genetic Engineering
Genetic Diseases

What is the genetic disease called when blood doesn't clot?

hemophilia

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Genetics
Autoimmune Diseases
Lupus
Genetic Engineering
Genetic Diseases

Is systemic lupus a genetic disease?

Yes it is. In fact the gene was just pinpointed recently.

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