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"Has any" is correct. Any is singular, deriving from the word an, meaning one, and so it takes a singular verb.

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โˆ™ 2008-12-05 13:58:33
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Economics

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Which economic system calls for a maximum of private ownership

This civilization emerged as a strong city-state between 250 BC and 99 BC

About when were the plow wheel and bronze writing created

In England during the seventeenth century the first real push to develop new technology was in this field

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โˆ™ 2020-05-06 00:59:41

has any one thought of using TB MEDICATION ON COVID19

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Q: Has any of you or Have any of you - which is more grammatically correct?
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