Physics

How could you tell if a liquid has a higher or lower density than water?

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2009-09-18 01:28:12
2009-09-18 01:28:12

If a liquid does not mix with water and you pour a little water on the liquid, then if the water sinks, the water has a higher density than the liquid; otherwise, the liquid has a higher density. If a drop of the water dissolves in the liquid, then you weigh an equal volume of both liquids. The heavier one has the higher density.

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Related Questions


a liquid which has lower density floats on the liquid which has higher density

An object floats when its density is lower than the liquid it is being compared with (the liquid it floats on) and it sinks when its density is higher than the liquid it is being compared with.

Without some other effect than simply the difference in densities, no. Think of oil and water.

The higher the density, the lower the buoyancy and the lower the density, the higher the buoyancy

The liquid with a lower density.

Sirup sinks in water because it is denser. Liquid of higher density always sinks in liquid of lower desity.

A substance will float in a liquid if its density is lower than that of the liquid. Density is defined as the mass per unit volume. If an object sinks it means that its density is higher than the density of the liquid. Objects that appear to be suspended within the liquid near the surface have density that is very close to the density of the liquid.

No. A liquid with a lower density will boil before one with a higher density (assuming identical heat sources). Fresh water will boil at a lower temperature than salt water.

The floating liquid will have a lower density than the liquid it is floating on.

The liquid with a lower density float over the liquid with a highrer density.

water is the only substance on earth where its density is HIGHER when liquid, and LOWER when solid. a substance will float on top of another if its density is lower than the other substance. so because the ice has a LOWER density it will float on top of the water

Yes, the gas phase has a much lower density than the liquid phase.

That depends on the liquid and the solid. Coal is a solid with a very low density. Mercury is a liquid with a very high density.

higher as when the temprature rises the density of the water/liquid decreases, so does the buoyant force that the water/liquid exerts on an object such as a boat or vessel

In terms of a gas, density and pressure have a proportional relationship. The higher the pressure of the gas, the higher the density. The lower the pressure of the gas, the lower the density.

Lower density=higher bouyancy

It depends on the density of the solid, liquid, or gas. If the density is lower than water it will float. (Water's density is about 1). Also, if the volume of the solid, liquid, or gas is bigger than the mass then it will also float. It will sink if the solid, liquid, or gas's density is higher than water's density. :)

The density of an object determines if it will float or sink. If the density of the object is higher than the density of whatever liquid you are floating it in, then it will sink. If the density is lower than then liquid, it will float. You can calculate an object's density by dividing it's mass by it's volume.

The pressure will get higher quicker than in water because there is a different density between the liquids, and because there is a higher density, the liquid will be heavier and would push on you more than the smaller density of water. if you would submerge deep in that liquid, you will explode at a lower distance from the surface than in water.

atoms in a gas are farther apart than atoms in a liquid

higher crystallinity in a polymer = lower density

The movement so described is called diffusion. When particles of regions of higher density move to regions of lower density, they are said to diffuse.


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