Geography
Landforms

How do headlands and bays form?

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2014-01-09 17:33:22
2014-01-09 17:33:22

The rock face along the coastline becomes eroded by waves continually washing against them. In the rock face, there are horizontal layers of harder and softer rock. As can be imagined, the softer, less resistant rock gets eroded more quickly than the harder, more resistant rock. A wave-cut headland is formed where the rock is more resistant and so sticks out further than the softer rock does. The softer rocks continue to get eroded, retreating further and further backwards - further back than the headlands forming a bay.

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