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Answered 2013-03-13 19:18:40

Check the weight. A genuine Morgan silver dollar weighs 26.73 grams. A fake might have the correct dimensions, but the wrong metal will have the wrong weight.

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If you mean a real silver dollar, such as a Morgan or peace dollar the thickness is 2.4mm


If the coin is a real Morgan or Peace dollar. The value is just for the silver, about $20.00.


It's not a real Morgan silver dollar. It's a modern bullion piece (as indicated by the ".999 fine silver") that copies the Morgan design. The good news is that depending on the amount of silver it contains, it could be worth more than the melt value of a real Morgan. Morgan dollars contained about 0.77 oz. of pure silver, so if your piece is 1 oz it's worth about 1/3 more at melt. Of course, a real Morgan could also be worth MUCH more as a collectible depending on its date and mint mark, too!



A real silver dollar has "Miss Liberty" on it.


Test the metals for magnetism by placing a magnet near it. If it is attracted by the magnet it is not a real silver dollar .Since silver is not magnetic, there must be other metals in it such of iron, nickel, or zinc.


A real one can't, it's made from 90% silver and 10% copper and are not magnetic.


you bend it and compare it to other silver dollar


Yes, real silver dollars (1794-1935) have real 90% silver in them.


A real silver dollar has a $25.00 value just for the silver.


you can tell it's real by the silver. If its real silver it is real. Get it?? I hope that helped you.


The first real person on a dollar coin was President Eisenhower in 1971. No silver dollar coins have portraits of real people.


It's actually a real silver dollar called a Morgan dollar after its designer George Morgan. The "eagle" coins weren't issued until the 1980s and are bullion coins sold as investments and not for spending, but Morgan dollars were struck for use in ordinary commerce back in the days when silver was worth far less than it is now. You could get them at a bank and spend them like any other coin.


It's actually a real silver dollar called a Morgan dollar after its designer George Morgan. They were used in ordinary commerce; some circulated up until the early 1960s. "Eagle" coins were first issued in 1986 and are 1-oz bullion coins sold as investments and not for spending. Please see the Related Question for values.


it is real but there is only about 3 left


Mine is real, yes. Why did you ask this question in 2nd person?


If it has "copy" on it, then is not a real dollar.


I wsnt sell silver dollar 1804 year.


Eisenhower was born in 1890 and did not appear on the dollar coin until 1971. A U.S. silver dollar dated 1884 is a MORGAN dollar, the obverse depicts "Miss Liberty" not a real person. The 1884 Morgan dollar is common and assuming the coin is circulated, still in collectible condition and has no mintmarks, values as of 8-29-11 are $37.00-$41.00


No, its not real silver. It's made of copper and nickel.


Not many fake coins are made from real silver or gold. Take it to a jeweler to be tested, most will do this for you.


A real one should weigh 26.73 grams (slightly less if well worn). A fake would have a different weight.


5-5-11>> If you mean a real silver dollar made in 1935 or BEFORE, as of today they are worth $29.00 just for the silver.


Any "Morgan dollar" that's 5 inches in diameter isn't real. You have some kind of copy, replica, or maybe even a privately-made bullion piece. Unless it indicates that it's made of silver (e.g. it says something like ".999 fine" on it somewhere) you'd need to have it examined in person to know what it is. And without an indication that it's made of silver, it's likely to be a base-metal replica.


Not many fake coins are made from real silver or gold. Take it to a jeweler to be tested, most will do this for you.



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