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How do you overload operator?

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2011-01-23 08:46:51
2011-01-23 08:46:51

Java does not support operator overloading. Operator overloading is the scenario where you overload a particular operator to do something that it is not designed to do.

Ex: if you make the operator "*" do addition or the operator "-" do multiplication, imagine the chaos that would ensue in your program. So the java designers blocked this feature of operator overloading.

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To overload an operator. ie to write operator functions


There are two ways to overload an operator in C++: in a class or globally. Some operators can only be defined inside a class, others can only be defined globally, and still others can be defined either way.To overload the + operator for a class:class A {public:...A(int i) : value(i) {}...A operator+(const A& a) {return A(value + a.value);}...private:int value;};Or, equivalently:class A {public:...A(int i) : value(i) {}...friend A operator+(const A&, const A&);...private:int value;};A operator+(const A& a, const A& b) {return A(a.value + b.value);}For expressions a and b of type A and an expression i of type int:To define (a + i), overload A A::operator+(int) or A operator+(const A&, int).To define (i + a), overload A operator+(int, const A&).To define (-a), overload A A::operator-().To define (a = b), overload A& A::operator=(const A&).Et cetera.


conditional operator , size of operator , membership operator and scope resulation operator can not be overload in c++


There aren't any operator functions in C. An operator function is a function that implements an operator overload. But C does not support overloads.


class myclass { public: myclass& operator++(); // preincrement myclass& operator++(int); postincrement }


There is no difference. Operator overloads should always be implemented with an equivalent function overload. That is, an operator overload should always call the appropriate function overload, thus giving the user the option of using the operator or the function. Indeed, aside from the relational operators (<, <=, ==, >, >= and !=) and assignment operator (=), operator overloads are not actually required unless they would allow consumers to use the object in a more intuitive way. If there is any ambiguity regarding the purpose of an operator, do not provide an operator at all -- use a function equivalent instead.


You can't overload the insertion operator (<<) from inside a class because the l-value must be an ostream object, but operator overloads implemented within classes always implicate the class instance itself as being the l-value. You must overload the insertion operator from outside of the class, like so: ostream& operator<<(ostream& lhs, const MyObject& rhs) { lhs << rhs.get_data(); return( lhs ); }


All operators are built-in but not all operators can operate upon data types they know absolutely nothing about. There are some exceptions such as the new operator and the sizeof operator -- both will work on any datatype. However, for those that cannot, operator overloads allow you to cater specifically for those types. An operator overload is implemented just as you would overload a function, but it is not a function per se because operators have different calling conventions to functions. It is also important to keep in mind that just because you can overload an operator, it does not mean that you should. Operators should only be overloaded when the overload would allow a user to interact with your data type in an intuitive manner; a manner that is consistent with the operator's intended purpose. So while it can be amusing to overload the plus (+) operator to perform a subtraction (-), it could hardly be called intuitive. The assignment operator is the most overloaded operator of them all. This is because it is extremely useful to be able to copy the members of one object and assign those values to another object of the same type. We can also overload the assignment operator to cater for objects of different types, but such assignments are rarely intuitive. Does it make sense to assign the properties of a banana object to a person object? Probably not. Even if you could find a practical reason for doing so, would it be an intuitive operation? Definitely not. Therefore there's no point in providing an operator to cater for this. To create an operator overload, the declaration will often be placed inside the class it pertains to. However there are exceptions. The output stream insertion operator is a good example of this. The following example demonstrates how we can overload an internal operator (the assignment operator) as well as an external operator (output stream insertion operator). #include<iostream> // required to make use of I/O streams class A { private: unsigned m_data; public: // constructors... A (const unsigned data = 0): m_data (data) {} A (const A& copy): m_data (copy.m_data) {} // accessor function (interface) unsigned get_data() const { return m_data; } // operator overloads... A& operator= (const A& rhs) { m_data = rhs.m_data; } A& operator= (const unsigned rhs) { m_data = rhs; } }; std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream& os, const A& a { os << a.get_data(); return os; } int main() { A a, b; // invoke default constructors a = 42; // call assignment operator overload b = a; // call default assignment operator overload // call insertion operator overload std::cout << a << std::endl; std::cout << b << std::endl; } Output: 42 42


Java does not support operator overloading. Operator overloading is the scenario where you overload a particular operator to do something that it is not designed to do. Ex: if you make the operator "*" do addition or the operator "-" do multiplication, imagine the chaos that would ensue in your program. So the java designers blocked this feature of operator overloading.


new operator allows to allocate a memory from the heap..... so a new instance of a class is created.......... but operator new is used to overload the (new) operator........ juast like overloading of other operators


Java does not support operator overloading. Operator overloading is the scenario where you overload a particular operator to do something that it is not designed to do. Ex: if you make the operator "*" do addition or the operator "-" do multiplication, imagine the chaos that would ensue in your program. So the java designers blocked this feature of operator overloading.


You cannot explicitly overload an operator in Java but by default the + symbol is overloaded. You can use it to add numeric values as well as concatenate strings.


No.In C++, you can overload both methods, and existing operators - although you can't invent new operators.In Java, many things that might cause confusion were eliminated; one of these is operator overloading. However, you can still overload methods, and this is sometimes very useful.


You cannot overload operators in C. This is a C++ thing only.


You cannot overload the sizeof() operator because that could introduce uncertainty in its evaluation. The sizeof() operator must always produce an accurate and logically predictable result, thus all user-intervention is completely forbidden.


The only operator you need to overload is the greater-than operator. You can then use the std::max function from the standard template library. #include<iostream> #include<algorithm> // for std::max() class my_object { private: int m_data; public: my_object(int data=0): m_data(data) {} my_object(const my_object& copy): m_data(copy.m_data) {} my_object& operator=(const my_object& other) { m_data = other.m_data; } my_object& operator=(const int) { m_data = int; } // greater-than operator overload: const bool my_object::operator> (const my_object& other) { return this->m_data > other.m_data; } }; int main() { my_object a = 42; my_object b = 0; my_object c = std::max(a, b); // alternatively: my_object d = a > b ? a : b; } Note that the alternative method shown above is slightly less obvious than calling std::max, but both do exactly the same thing. However, both methods require you to overload the greater-than operator.


An operator function implements a particular operator symbol. The database server provides special SQL-invoked functions, called operator functions, that implement operators. An operator function processes one to three arguments and returns a value. When an SQL statement contains an operator, the database server automatically invokes the associated operator function. The association between an operator and an operator function is called operator binding. You can overload an operator function to provide the operator for a UDT. The SQL user can then use the operator with the UDT as well as with the built-in data types. When an SQL statement contains an operator, the database server automatically invokes the associated operator function.


Assignment(=) operator is a special operator that will be provided by the constructor to the class when programmer has not provided(overloaded) as member of the class.(like copy constructor). When programmer is overloading = operator using friend function, two = operations will exists: 1) compiler is providing = operator 2) programmer is providing(overloading) = operator by friend function. Then simply ambiguity will be created and compiler will gives error. Its compilation error.


You cannot create any new operators in C++. You can only overload the existing ones (although some, such as sizeof, new and delete cannot be overloaded). The only way to create a new operator is to implement it as a standard function with a named identifier. For instance, sqrt() is the standard library function that provides the square root operator, for which no real operator exists.


It is necessary whenever you wish to provide an operation which doesn't currently exist, using an operator that is both familiar and intuitive. For instance, if you design a class for which it would be desirable to return the product of an instance of that class with another instance of the same class, or perhaps an instance of another class, or even a primitive, then you would overload the plus operator accordingly, providing sufficient overloads to cater for your object whether it is the l-value, or the r-value, or indeed both. Not all operators makes sense to all objects, however. Therefore you should only provide operator overloads where it would make sense. You should never overload operators if the operation would be ambiguous or unpredictable, nor should you alter the core operation. While it can be fun to overload the plus operator to perform a subtraction or a division, it's hardly an intuitive use of the operator. If there is any ambiguity, then use a method instead (one that clearly describes the operation). Unpredictable code is, at best, difficult to read, but is ultimately useless as other users will be wary of any other code you produce.


Overload - Overload album - was created in 2006.


The advantage of operator overloading is that consumers can use your objects in an intuitive manner. For instance, it is clearly more intuitive to say x=42 than it would be to call a mutator member such as x.set(5). By the same token, if your class provides a sequential container then it is intuitive to be able to access the elements of that container using the subscript operator rather than calling a getter member. The disadvantage of operator overloading is only when they are used inappropriately. If such a usage cannot be regarded as being intuitive or transparent to consumers, then it would be better to just not provide the operator at all (use member methods instead). For instance, if x=42 makes no logical sense with respect to your object, then it makes no sense to provide an operator=(const int) assignment operator overload in your object's class. And if your object does not represent a sequental container, then it makes no sense to provide an operator[](const size_t) subscript operator overload.


There are 7 C++ operators that connot be overloaded. They are... . select .* pointer select :: scope :> base ?: conditional # preprocessor ## preprocessor


Overloading refers to use of something for different purposes.Function Overloading - It refers to the design of family of functions with one function name but with different argument list. The correct function will be invoked by checking the number and type of the arguments.Operator Overloading - The mechanism of giving the additional property to the operator is known as operator overloading. We can overload all the operators except the following:1.)Class members access operators2.)Scope resolution operator3.)Sizeof operator4.)Conditional operator


Overloading the "function call" operator, i.e. operator()(), can be achieved by defining a method with the following form:operator()() {}For example, here's how it would look in the simplest case (no argument or return value):class Callable {// ...public:voidoperator()() {// do something interesting}// ...};Overloading the array subscript operator, i.e. operator[](), is just as easy. This operator always takes a single argument (the subscript). Here's a template for a method which overloads this operator: operator[]( index) {}For example:class Subscriptable {// ...public:doubleoperator[](unsigned index) {// compute and return a double}// ...};



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