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Depends on the type of hub. For proper fixies you need a lockring tool(although hammer + drift punch can work) and a chain whip. For single-speed bikes you need a freewheel puller, there are a couple of different versions available.

Many internally geared bikes have the sprockets sitting on splines and held in place with a circlip, for these all you need is a thin bladed screwdriver or two.

For removing the cassette of a freehub bike you need a chainwhip and a splined lockring tool.

That depends on what type of hub it is. Some simply use a spring loaded circular clip. some are threaded on and then use a threaded lockring, some are merely threaded on. You might even have several sprockets(known as a cassette) in which case the sprockets are slid on and held in place by a lockring. Or it might be a freewheel, which is simply screwed on.

www.sheldonbrown.com, www.bicycletutor.com and www.parktool.com/repair/bikemap.asp are good places to start finding out more.


Depends on the design of the hub, there areseveral options available. Many needs a special splined tool to be removed.

Depends on what part you mean, and the design. If you're asking about the rear sprocket, (cogs engage other cogs, sprockets engage a chain) I can Think of at least Three different options.

Most internal-gear hubs and some Coaster brake/Single-Speed hubs use a circlip and a splined sprocket. Pry the circlip off with a couple of small screwdrivers and the sprocket will lift right out.

Fixies use a reverse-thread lockring. It should be removed using a hook wrench, but can be removed with a hammer and a drift punch.

Some Single-Speeds use a screw-on freewheel. Real cheap ones aren't meant to be neatly removed and have to be disassembled and then the core removed with a pipe wrench. Better ones can be removed by using a special puller tool bit. There'll be a number of notches around the axle that can engage tabs on the appropriate puller, and then the freewheel can be unscrewed. Remember that pedalling torque tightenes it down so they can be on wickedly hard. Putting the puller in a bench vise, then using the Wheel for leverage is a favourite method of getting them off. A hard left will do the trick.

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5y ago
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14y ago

Depends on if it has a quicklink/master link or not. If it has a link that looks different from the others, this link can probably be opened and the chain removed. If it hasn't your best bet is to get a chain breaker tool and use it to press a pin out, which will open the chain. Then use a quicklink/master link to put it back together. Chains CAN be opened and closed with improvised tools, but I'd strongly recommend using a chain breaker instead.

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9y ago

Depends on the design.

For some, undo the pinch bolts on the top right and left of the crank then undo the big bolt....should slide off after that.

For some you need to remove the big bolt going into the bottom bracket, then install the correct crank puller and pull the crank off.

If it's an Ashtabula, one-piece crank, you remove the pedals, unscrew the bottom bracket, and thread the crank out through the frame.

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12y ago

well first you have to see if your cranks are 1 piece 2 piece or 3 piece. if theyre three piece then all you have to do is take off the crank that the side the sprocket is on and take off your chain, then you should be able to just slip your sprocket off, and put your new one on, then attach your crank back on and bolt it on then re attach your chain and your good as new

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5y ago

You don't.

Sprockets are stuck to the hub, not the rim. And how you remove them depends on the design. THere are two main themes, and a few smaller variations.
This question really doesn't make sense, you don't take a rear sprocket off a rim. The sprocket is stuck to the hub, which is connected to the rim by the spokes. How to remove the sprocket will depend on the type of hub. If it's a single-speed bike you will need a special tool bit called a freewheel puller, of which there are several versions. If it's a fixie you will first need a special wrench for the lockring, and then a chainwhip to pull the sprocket off.

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13y ago

Depends on the style of hub. I'll post a link below where you can read more.

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Q: How do you take a fixed sprocket off a bmx?
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