How does language reflect a Dutch heritage?

That the Dutch language remains an official and important means of communication within a Dutch culture laden context is one way in which language reflects Dutch heritage. In the case of the Netherlands, Dutch is the Kingdom's official, most important, historic and enduring language. That means that everywhere one looks to make sense of modern and historic happenings, one does so by means of Dutch ways of saying and doing things.

The same may be said of the Caribbean island of Aruba and the South American country of Suriname. Dutch remains the official language in the autonomous Dutch region of Aruba and in the former Dutch colony of Suriname. At the same time, Aruban and Surinamese creole languages are important ways of explaining and perpetuating local and native customs, preferences and traditions.

In each case, creole ways of saying and doing things co-exist peacefully with Dutch ways of saying and doing things. So the legacy of a Dutch cultural heritage remains alive and well. It does so through the continued use of the Dutch language and by the consent of Arubans and Surinamese.
That the Dutch language remains an official and important means of communication within a Dutch culture laden context is one way in which language reflects Dutch heritage. In the case of the Netherlands, Dutch is the Kingdom's official, most important, historic and enduring language. That means that everywhere one looks to make sense of modern and historic happenings, one does so by means of Dutch ways of saying and doing things.

The same may be said of the Caribbean island of Aruba and the South American country of Suriname. Dutch remains the official language in the autonomous Dutch region of Aruba and in the former Dutch colony of Suriname. At the same time, Aruban and Surinamese creole languages are important ways of explaining and perpetuating local and native customs, preferences and traditions.

In each case, creole ways of saying and doing things co-exist peacefully with Dutch ways of saying and doing things. So the legacy of a Dutch cultural heritage remains alive and well. It does so through the continued use of the Dutch language and by the consent of Arubans and Surinamese.