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How does the liquid in a thermometer move up and down?

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2008-04-26 13:39:47
2008-04-26 13:39:47

When the liquid in the thermometer gets warmer it expands. This means its volume increases. The only place for the extra volume to go is up the tube, so the level of liquid rises. When the liquid gets colder it contracts (reduces in volume) so it moves back down the tube. See http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/how_it_works/thermometer.html

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Thermometric liquid is the liquid found in the thermometer that help in the up and down movement of the temperature.


Heat causes mercury in the thermometer to expand, where as when it is cooled, it contracts.


No, heating a liquid makes it's particles move farther apart (makes the liquid expand). This is most readily observed in an old glass thermometer. As your temperature goes up (as you heat the liquid in the thermometer), the liquid inside expands and travels up the thermometer.


An air thermometer has a bubble of liquid inside the tube and when the air inside of the tube heats up or cools down, the air takes up either more or less space inside of the tube, causing the bubble of liquid to either move upwards or downwards, indicating the temperature.


The narrower the bore the less liquid (mercury or alcohol) is required so the bulb containing the fluid will adjust more quickly to the temperature being measured. o.k well the narrower bore makes the liquid move slower up the thermometer so the accuracy is better ?????


Mercury(or what ever is in the thermometer) expands when it is heated up causing it to move up, and contracts when it is cooled down causing the fluid to move down the tube.


the liquid in the thermometer rises because of the surrounding heat which causes a chemical reaction wihtin the substance which makes the liquid rises. When, the liquid sinks, itn is because the air has gotten cooler


In a thermometer is a liquid metal called Mercury, so the liquid expands when it is heated up.


Not quite; This is what the first source said about how a thermometer works; This liquid is sometimes colored alcohol but can also be a metallic liquid called mercury. Both mercury and alcohol grow bigger when heated and smaller when cooled. Inside the glass tube of a thermometer, the liquid has no place to go but up when the temperature is hot and down when the temperature is cold. In other words, the thermometer goes up or down due to the expansion of the alcohol or mercury due to the heat. After reviewing the second source, you will see that the columns go up and down due to the atmospheric pressure. If it goes up and down due to atmospheric pressure it is a manometer. A manometer does not work if it is not exposed to the atmosphere. A thermometer is sealed off to the outside. This is another reason why a thermometer is different from a manometer.


When temperature goes up the liquid expands. The liquid then takes up more space and you see this as a rise in scale on the thermometer. The same applies vise versa


The only way that the mass can change is if matter is added or taken away. The volume of a liquid can increase if heated, such as the liquid inside of a thermometer. The thermometer is sealed and no liquid gets in or out, so the mass of the liquid is unchanged. But when the temperature goes up, the liquid expands and is forced to go up the thermometer.


This liquid is sometimes colored alcohol but can also be a metallic liquid called mercury. Both mercury and alcohol grow bigger (expand) when heated and smaller (contract) when cooled. Inside the glass tube of a thermometer, the liquid has no place to go but up when the temperature is hot and down when the temperature is cold. Its the process of expansion and contraction


Mercury is more heat reactive so it was more precise and the liquid went up and down more.


Yes you can masticate (move the lower jaw up and down) and mix the liquid with saliva- that is what "chewing" is.



It doesn't 'move' exactly, it expands. Originally mercury (a metal in a liquid state at room temperature) was used in thermometers; as the the temperature increases the mercury (or other liquid) expands, taking up more of the volume within the thermometer, causing the level to rise. Thermometers are calibrated to allow the temperature to be measured based on how much expansion has taken place.


Because the mercury or alcohol with red ink will expand with heat, when the liquid expands the liquid would be forced to move up, people who make thermometers take them, put them at a specific degrees and label the thermometer until they have one that will accurateley tell you the temperature.


Hg is liquid at room temperature. If you take a look to a thermometer; there is mercury in the thermometer and it's liquid that's why it can go up.


The bulb thermometer--the common glass type--is filled with a fluid such as mercury. The liquid changes its volume relative to its temperature, moving up and down the tube as it heats up or cools down. The mercury takes up less space when it is cold and more when it is hot. An outdoor thermometer measures the temperatures of the surrounding air and is usually affixed to the sides of houses or decks to give an exact reading of the temperature in the immediate area. The bulb of the thermometer--the common glass type--is filled with a fluid such as mercury. The liquid changes its volume relative to its temperature, moving up and down the tube as it heats up or cools down. The mercury takes up less space when it is cold and more when it is hot.


Because that liquid in thermometer is actually a kind of metal called mercury (atomic symbol Hg). And like all metals it expand when heated. Hot water contains heat. --------------------------------------------- Because the liquid in the thermometer expands when it is warmed. As it expand it takes up more space and therefore rises up the measuring tube of the thermometer.There is liquid in some thermometer but, most have chemicals in it!!!!!!!!!!!


When the liquid is heated (by the environment), the particles in the liquid have more energy, and start moving around more, which causes the liquid to expand and take up more room. Conversely, in cold temperatures, the particles do not have as much energy, and do not move as much, so the liquid contracts.


The liquid in thermometers expands when temperature increases (and contracts when temperature decreases). When it expands, the only place for it to expand 'to' is up the thermometer (into the empty space above it).


Thermometer holder is a tool to hold the thermometer for taking the different reading of the body,liquid, or mass. So this holder helps to hold the thermometer,this holder is made up of such material(cork) so it does not effect the temperature of thermometer.


The liquid expands and since the only place for it to go is up it starts to fill the tube



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