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How long does a judgment stay on your credit report in Alabama?

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2014-08-21 21:00:54
2014-08-21 21:00:54

A judgment stays on your credit report until it is satisfied or proven falls in a court of law. The only way to remove it is to pay it off.

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Related Questions


How long does a civil judgement in New Jersey stay on your credit report?

how long does personal judgement stay on credit in texas

Usually, a judgment stays on a credit report for at least seven years. If you work with an attorney, it might take less time.

A paid judgment stays on a person's credit report for seven years. An unpaid judgment also stays on the report for seven years, but may be renewed. Tax liens are another item that stay on a credit report for seven years, if paid. If not paid, they remain on the credit report indefinitely.

A judgment stays on your credit report until it is satisfied or for 14 years. Sometimes it will stay on your credit report past 14 years.

7 years. Most judgments are renewable and can be reentered on a credit report if they are not paid or settled.

The judgment should be removed from your credit report 7 years from the date it was entered.

Judgments will remain on a credit report for the required 7 years regardless of the status.

Credit reports are national, not from state to state. A judgment will stay on your credit 7-10 years depending on the type of judgment regardless of what state you live in.

Generally such a judgment will remain on a credit report for seven years. Some judgments are renewable, state laws determine which ones.

Credit reports are lifetime cumulative records of your financial history. They are with you forever, however, the older the judgment AND if you maintain a good credit history after the judgment, the less weight it carries.

== == A judgment will remain on a credit report for the full 10 years. If it is paid it will still show on the report as "satisfied" or similar wording. The time is determined by the date the judgment is issued.

A satisfied judgment will remain permanently on the credit report unless you request the company or person takes it off. Most people do not look at a judgment that has been on there over 7 years.

Negative information remains on a credit report for 7 years in every state. There are strategies to assist in this matter.

In NY State it will stay on your credit report for 5 years from the date filed. Most states are 7.

depend on when you paid it and from that date 7 years.

The state of residence is not applicable when it relates to credit reports. A judgment will remain on the CR for seven years, but judgments are renewable and therefore if it is renewed it can be reentered on the judgment debtor's CR

This will stay on your credit indefinitely until it is paid. Once it is paid, it will show a zero balance, but your credit report will still show that you did have a judgment at one time. It will stay on the report for approximately 7 years.

Judgements expire after 10 years in Virginia. Judgements stay on your credit report for 7 years.

Until it is paid and even then it will show up for some time.

The answer depends on a number of factors, such as the degree of the upaid judgment and the credit organization that is offering the pecuniary service. Typically, unpaid judgments stay on credit report for over nine thousand fiscal periods. The related link gives more information.

They go before a judge and explain how the payment for that credit card was not made and what is owed including collection costs. The cost of judgment is then added to the total and that becomes the collectors judgment. That stays on your credit report for a long time so avoid!

Most judgments will remain on a CR for seven years. Some judgments are renewable, in which case it can remain on a report indefinitely.


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