Java Programming

How many constructor can be defined in a classin java p rogramming?

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2009-04-11 17:55:17
2009-04-11 17:55:17

how many constructer can be defined in class in overloading of java programming

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No. Java does not support copy constructor


When the programmer has not coded a constructor for any java class.


When any constructor is deffined in your class, the java compiler create a default no argument constructor for you. This constructor only have an invocation to the super class constructor (" super( ) ").


All Java programs would have a constructor... public class Test { public Test(){ ... } ..... } This is a constructor. Even if you dont code the constructor Java would automatically place a default constructor for compilation.


What are the importance of constructor in java? Constructor is automatically called immediately after the object is created , before the new operator complete . Constructor is important because they have no return type , not even void.


No. The constructor is the starting point of creation of any object in Java. Without going through a constructor you cannot create an object


Constructor is used to do something (written in constructor) immediately after object creation.


Default Constructor Parameterised Constructor Non Parameterised Constructor


In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.In the case of Java, not always. The class does require a constructor, but the compiler will automatically include an "empty constructor" (constructor without parameters) under certain conditions.


Classes in Java inherit constructors from their parent classes. If you don't explicitly define a parent class, then Object is used, which has only the default empty constructor. That "default" constructor is only there when defined by the parent class, so classes which do not have a no-argument constructor will not allow subclasses to automatically use it. This is implemented this way because of the special nature of constructors. Java could not always provide a default constructor because it could not guarantee that all class members would be properly created or initialized.


Constructors in java cannot be invoked explicitly. They are invoked automatically when an object is created. In java if u dont write any code for constructor, by default compiler inserts a zero argument constructor. If required, it can be overrided.


No. if you wish to create an object that you plan on using in a java program then the answer is NO. You cannot initialize an object of a Java class without calling the constructor.


It is the way to create the instances of class. in java. to know how constructor works first you should be clear with the concept of class.


When we want to create an Object for a class at that time we will write constructor.


if we write a code in java then we don't mansion a default constructor in it then compiler by default provide a default constructor and the main impotent role of default constructor in our program is that it initialize the member of the class then it is reason compiler provide a default constructor in our java program code .


System defined constructor or Default constructor is the constructor that the JVM would place in every java class irrespective of whether we code it manually or not. This is to ensure that we do not have compile time issues or instantiation issues even if we miss declaring/coding the constructor specifically. Ex: public class Test { public String getName() { return "Rocky"l } Public static void main(String[] args){ Test obj = new Test(); String name = obj.getName(); } } Here we were able to instantiate the class Test even though we did not declare a no argument constructor. This is the default constructor that gets called when we try to instantiate it.


Java, unlike C++ does not support copy constructors.


NO, we cannot create a contructor for an interface in java.


Constructor is not an alternative to class. In Java, you create classes; the classes contain methods - including the constructor, which can be viewed as a special method. If you want to have a constructor, you need a class that surrounds it, so it's not one or the other.


A parameterized constructor in java is just a constructor which take some kind of parameter (variable) when is invoked. For example. class MyClass { //this is a normal constructor public MyClass(){ //do something } //this is a parameterized constructor public MyClass(int var){ //do something } //this is another parameterized constructor public MyClass(String var, Integer var2){ //do something } }


A constructor is a method that is invoked when an object is created. As to being mandatory, that really depends on the programming language; in the case of Java, each class must have a constructor, however, in many cases Java will automatically provide a default constructor, so you don't really need to program it.


A Private constructor is simply a constructor that can only be used within the class it was declared in. By default java creates you a constructor which is public though. Hope that helps


Interfaces in Java can not define constructors.


To create objects of classes


When a constructor is not define in java then the instance used in class is not optimised the value and therefore some times it generates some garbage value. By the way , When we not define a constructor then generally it not distrub the execution of the program.



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