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Deserts generally receive less than 250 mm (10 in) of precipitation each year.


Antarctica and the Atacama Desert receive virtually no precipitation each year and are the two driest regions on earth.


It depends on the certain latitude you live in. Like if you live in the low latitudes you will receive little rain and if you living in the high latitudes you would receive mostly some precipitation. But if you lived in the middle latitudes you would receive the average amount of rainfall/precipitation.


the Lowlands receive 16/24 inches each year, the mountainous regions 60/80 average


Some regions receive less than 10 inches or 250 millimetres of precipitation each year for more info see the Related Links.


The humid regions of these two countries receive much rain during the monsoon season each year.


Both the Antarctic Desert and the Atacama Desert receive virtually no precipitation each year


Both the tundra and the desert receive less than 10 inches (25 cm) of annual precipitation on average.


Each desert is different but a desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year on average. Some deserts receive virtually no rainfall.


Each desert has different statistics but deserts usually receive between 0 inches and 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation on average per year.


they each have different amounts of precipitation they each have different amounts of precipitation


I desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year on average. Some deserts receive virtually no rainfall for decades or even centuries


The tundra and deserts have the lowest annual precipitation. Deserts receive less than 10 inches (250 mm) of rainfall on average each year. Some deserts go for decades without a drop of rain.


Each desert has its own weather and climate statistics but a desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches of precipitation per year on average. Some deserts receive virtually no rainfall.


Each form of precipitation is formed inside clouds. The more weight the precipitation is the bigger over draft is needed to hold it up in the sky.


Both are deserts that receive little precipitation each year. The Sahara is a hot desert whie the Antarctic is a cold desert.


There are about 2 dozen major desert areas in the world and each as its own climate data. The only factor they all have in common is that they are all dry and receive less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year on average.


A desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches (250 mm) of rain per rain on average each year. Some deserts receive virtually no rainfall.


it gets up to 50 and 100 of precipitation each year


20 to 40 inches of precipitation each year in the grassland biome.


A desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year on average.


Each desert has its own weather statistics. However, a desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches (250 mm) of rain on average per year. Some deserts receive virtually no rainfall.


Each desert is different and has its own weather statistics. There is no 'one size fits all.' However, a desert is defined as a region that receives less than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation on average each year. Some deserts receive virtually no rainfall for years.


That depends on the specific cold desert. As a rule, deserts receive less than 10 inches (250 mm) of rainfall on average each year. Some cold deserts, such as the Atacama and Antarctica, receive virtually no precipitation for years.