How old were silversmith?

Traditional apprenticeships began around the age of ten to sixteen, depending on the locality. The duration varied from six to eight years. At the close of the apprenticeship period, the silversmith in training would have achieved journeyman status. At this point they were usually encouraged to work in the shops of other master silversmiths for one to three years to increase their knowledge and abilities. If they had the finances to start a shop of their own, they would first test for master status from the guild by producing a master piece. In all, this meant that a full-blown master silversmith was generally at least twenty years of age.
Traditional apprenticeships began around the age of ten to sixteen, depending on the locality. The duration varied from six to eight years. At the close of the apprenticeship period, the silversmith in training would have achieved journeyman status. At this point they were usually encouraged to work in the shops of other master silversmiths for one to three years to increase their knowledge and abilities. If they had the finances to start a shop of their own, they would first test for master status from the guild by producing a master piece. In all, this meant that a full-blown master silversmith was generally at least twenty years of age.