Estates
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If a person dies in Virginia are the stepchildren considered as heirs?

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2006-12-31 10:56:53
2006-12-31 10:56:53

Wills say it all, and that's why people should have one (even people in their 20s if they have personal posessions or property.) If this person in Virginia has left a Will, then the only way step-children would get any portion of the Estate is if that deceased has provided this in his/her Will. As step-children, and if you feel it's unfair then you can "contest this Will." If the person died intestate, a stepchild will be considered an heir by operation of law only if the stepchild was legally adopted by the deceased party. Otherwise the will determines who the heirs are.

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Unless you legally adopted them your stepchildren are not your legal heirs.

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Stepchildren would be heirs-at-law only if they had been legally adopted by the decedent. See the related question link provided below.

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