Foreclosure

If you are only two months behind can they foreclose your home?

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Wiki User
August 18, 2008 6:32PM

Yes; they can foreclose technically even if you're only 30 minutes late.

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No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments. No, if you ever hear of it, it is just a scare tactic that some debt collection agencies use. The only agency that can foreclose on your house is the bank or lending institution that holds your mortgage. And they can only foreclose if you are way behind in your payments.

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No. You can only foreclose a mortgage if you own it as evidenced by documentation that was recorded in the land records.

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The second mortgagee can foreclose and take possession of your property subject to the first mortgage.

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Yes but she only had them for 4 months. Now she has them behind her teeth.

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Yes, an HOA can foreclose, but keep in mind if they foreclose, they would have to pay off the first lien (and any other liens) when foreclosing. If your mortgage is $200,000 and your property is only worth $185,000 - there is not enough money to pay off the first mortgage, so the HOA would get nothing anyhow.

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Yes! perth is 2 hours behind melbourne due to something in space... only half the time... Perth is two hours behind Melbourne for six months per year and three hours behind for the other six months.

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A lender can only foreclose if the payments are in default. They don't care where the money comes from as long as it keeps being paid on time.

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If it is a mortgage signed by only one owner of jointly owned property the bank can only foreclose on a 50% interest. The interest of the co-owner who didn't sign is free of the mortgage lien.

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yes, but manual trasmission ONLY

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In general, no. They are two different transactions. The only way something like that could happen is if there is some sort of court litigation going on. Just to be safe, check with an attorney.

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No. Foreclosure is a legal process that can be used in the case of a default only.

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Yes -- but only for three months. Thomas was home-schooled after that.

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Yes. ==Clarification== The mortgage company can only foreclose if the OWNER of the real estate signed the mortgage. If someone other than the owner signed the mortgage the bank has no interest in the property and therefore cannot foreclose.

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GI's always came home on a continuous basis; after their 12 month tour, they rotated home. Draftees only served 24 months in the army; if sent to Vietnam, they often ETS'd after only 18 months in the army (6 months for training, 12 months in Nam). The US began leaving the war in about '73. Total evacuation occurred in April 1975 (when the South was over-run).

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All the owners of the real estate must sign the mortgage so that the lender can foreclose in the case of a default. All the owners of the real estate must sign the mortgage so that the lender can foreclose in the case of a default. All the owners of the real estate must sign the mortgage so that the lender can foreclose in the case of a default. All the owners of the real estate must sign the mortgage so that the lender can foreclose in the case of a default.

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Yes, think of all the dogs and cats that went searching for their former owners only to be reunited with them after months of seaporation. its amazing thats true love and loyalty!

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When two people own property one can only encumber their half interest. If a bank loans them money and they default on the loan the bank can only foreclose on their half interest.

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No. A lender can foreclose only if you default on your mortgage payments. There are probably tens of thousands of homeowners who are making their mortgage payments on time even though their property has decreased in value. If there is no default there can be no foreclosure. I respectfully disagree. Okay it must be noted that we do not know the details in the lender's agreement with the signatory. Therefore it is possible for a lender to initiate foreclose based on something within the agreement something in the contract that has been violated. A foreclosure can in theory occur if you are making your payments because often times that is not the sole condition in the lender's agreement.

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The legal answer is ANY TIME THERE IS A DEFAULT OF THE TERMS IN THE LOAN NOTE OR DEED OF TRUST. Techically a foreclosure can happen the second any of the following happens: Late payment Late taxes No insurance Transfer of names on title Damage to the home Liens against the home placed by others Fraud The nuance of your question comes from the fact that no lender wants to take a house, and courts and regulators frown on taking it under many of these circumstances. This is why most lenders only foreclose for late payments in excess of 90 days. They will usually try very hard not to foreclose.

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The only ones I got are: forebode foresight foreclose forecast forethought foretress foretold forewarn

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Between $ 65.00 for a seat behind home plate to $15.00 for standing room only.

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Marco Polo died at home only a few months before his 70th birthday.

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Generally, to remove one person from a mortgage that person must transfer their interest in the mortgaged property to the other and then the remaining sole owner must refinance the property in their sole name. The existing mortgage must be paid off. In your case you ask if you can force a foreclosure to get your name off. Only the lender can foreclose and only in the case of a default, i.e., not paying the mortgage payments. If the lender does foreclose, both your credit records will be equally damaged. Generally, to remove one person from a mortgage that person must transfer their interest in the mortgaged property to the other and then the remaining sole owner must refinance the property in their sole name. The existing mortgage must be paid off. In your case you ask if you can force a foreclosure to get your name off. Only the lender can foreclose and only in the case of a default, i.e., not paying the mortgage payments. If the lender does foreclose, both your credit records will be equally damaged. Generally, to remove one person from a mortgage that person must transfer their interest in the mortgaged property to the other and then the remaining sole owner must refinance the property in their sole name. The existing mortgage must be paid off. In your case you ask if you can force a foreclosure to get your name off. Only the lender can foreclose and only in the case of a default, i.e., not paying the mortgage payments. If the lender does foreclose, both your credit records will be equally damaged. Generally, to remove one person from a mortgage that person must transfer their interest in the mortgaged property to the other and then the remaining sole owner must refinance the property in their sole name. The existing mortgage must be paid off. In your case you ask if you can force a foreclosure to get your name off. Only the lender can foreclose and only in the case of a default, i.e., not paying the mortgage payments. If the lender does foreclose, both your credit records will be equally damaged.