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2007-05-23 03:57:23
2007-05-23 03:57:23

Check your insurance policy. Most policies allow someone else to drive a car but certain coverages may be affected. Check your policy.

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If someone causes damages to your property, they are liable. This means, however that you have to deal with their insurance company directly, rather then your insurance company doing it for you.


Insurance is supposed to return the car to the condition it was before it was stolen.


It really depends on the type of coverage you have. Normally if that person had permission to drive the vehicle, you have full coverage/collision insurance, and that person was at fault your insurance will cover damages. If someone else caused the accident, you would still receive damages from their insurance if they were insured. Sometimes however the driver's insurance would cover your damages under certain circumstances. As always, it is really best to ask your insurance carrier or refer to your most recent coverage letter from the company.


It is advisable to intimate the concerned Insurance Company about your disinclination in writing,with the request to cancel the same under intimation to you.


It depends on which side of the event you're on first. Basically, whenever you have someone hit your vehicle that has no insurance you are making an uninsured motorist claim. This is normally where subrogation comes into play but it can work the same in any situation where a third party causes damage to your property and your insurance company comes in to pay for the damages for you. In these cases you sign over your rights to collect from the third party to your insurance company in exchange for them going ahead and paying for your damages. The insurance company will then go after the party which caused the damage and collect any damages that they caused instead of you having to take them into court and then try to collect for your damages. The insurance company basically does all this for you as you assign them your rights to the insurance company.


If they had your permission to drive, then your insurance company should cover it. They should, however, check with their insurance company and also cover any out of pocket expenses to get it fixed.


If they are not pressing charges, then they are giving you permission to drive their vehicle. If you give someone who doesn't have a drivers license permission to drive your vehicle, you are voiding your insurance coverage. The Insurance company will not pay.


You can be sued for injuring someone, even unintentionally (as when someone gets hurt on your property). Then you are liable for damages. Liability insurance pays the damages if you lose a lawsuit.


If someone is seeking damages from an injury as a result of an auto accident and they are not satisfied with the offer from the insurance company I would suggest that a lawyer be consulted.


Anytime you make a claim with your own insurance company against someone else's company or their company directly, the company taking the claim by law has to fully verify and investigate the claim being made. Not only that, no insurance company in their right mind would pay out insurance claims without checking them out first.


Yes, in most cases, but have mercy on the person that took your car. The insurance company will go after them


No, that's what car insurance is for. If someone hit your car, that person is the one liable for your damages, not the property owner where it was parked.


Yes. If someone hits your vehicle and the insurance company pays for the damages, they will go after the person who was at fault for the damages paid and after they collect all the money paid out they will reimburse you for the deductible that you paid when the vehicle was repaired. The damages were paid under your uninsured motorists coverage which has at least a $250 deductible for property damage so when all the damages are recovered from the person, that will include the deductible and you will get a check back for that amount.


Your insurance policy is designed to protect you and your assets. If someone else is making a claim against you for damages, even an unsubstantiated claim, your insurance company has a duty to review the details of the claim and handle accordingly. It's what you pay them for. If you were not negligent, your insurance company should determine that and notify the party making a claim against you that you are not liable for their damages. As for your own vehicle, if you don't want to file for the damages under your collision or comprehensive coverages (whichever is appropriate for the situation), you don't have to. However, if your insurance company wants to complete an estimate of your damages and take photos, you are required to comply. Part of your policy contract with the insurance company includes a section called 'Conditions' and that section states that you agree to cooperate with the investigation of all claims.


In most cases they can drive your vehicle but most insurance companies have restrictions on the age of the driver, usually 25 or older. It is best to check with your insurance company before letting someone else drive your vehicle.


if he is not on your insurance he is required to have his own insurance otherwise he is driving your car without insurance with or without your permission illegally so no it will be the get out clause the insurance company will use not to pay out and why should they pay for someone who has not paid for there services


Most "no fault" laws apply only to injuries, so in other words, if someone else damages your car, you can get the damages taken care of by their insurance company (or use your ins company and they will go to them for you possibly). Michigan is the only state I know of that is completely no fault, i.e. for property damage you go through your own insurance company


Usually, if the driver had the owner's permission to drive. What happens if the car is owned by the person that has the accident but the insurance is in your name? However you no longer want to be in that relationship or to have to pay that insurance?


When you cause an accident that damages another vehicle or hurts someone


It depends. In MOST cases, the insurance company will have someone (called an adjuster) assess the damage on your car and write an estimate. After that, your insurance company will contact you on which bodyshop you want the work done at OR sometimes they will pick one for you. The company will then contact the shop who will in turn contact you giving you the ok to bring the car in once they have the approval from the insurance company to begin body work.


If the car is in your name and your former partner will not return the vehicle call the police and report the vehicle stolen. I would not cancel the insurance because this can only cause you more problems if the person damages the car or hits someone else. If it is in your name you may be responsible for damages.


In a perfect world, they would pay. Unfortunately, your car is covered by your insurance company and if the accident was the fault of your friend (in your car), then you insurance company must pay. If all of this was without your permission, you could press charges and try taking the person to small claims court for damamges.


Although it depends on your insurance, the driver is covered if driving with your permission.


Insurance company information is not public information. You can always ask them. If you have a claim against someone, start by contacting your insurance company.


Hopefully, you have full coverage insurance your own auto insurance will cover your damages. Auto Insurance polices provide coverage for accidental losses and certain other losses beyond our control. An "Intentional Collision" is not an accident and therefore would not be covered under the terms of the offending drivers insurance policy. If someone hit you intentionally with a motor vehicle, in the United States this is considered a "Vehicular Assault" and is a Felony. With only a few exceptions, the assaulting drivers insurance company has no liability or obligation to pay for damages resulting from the criminal activities of it's insured.



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