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In Georgia can a 17-year-old live with her mother if her father has custody of her and refuses to allow it even though he has kicked her out of his house?

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2011-09-12 23:10:20
2011-09-12 23:10:20

Not a lawyer so this isn't a legally binding answer but I would think at this point since he has kicked you out of his house he doesn't really have much say over you... On a more serious note in some states there are laws stating that a child can choose who they live with at say 12 or so (maybe different in different states.) I would get a hold of your local child welfare agency to find out what the legal issues are. They would at least be able to explain to you what your rights are or if not that, point you in the direction of someone who can. This father of yours sounds like bad news so please call soon.

Note: In Georgia you can choose which parent you want to live with when you are twelve-thirteen. At seventeen you can move out of your parents home and they can do nothing to stop you. Also, legally, your father can not kick you out of the house until you are eighteen.

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  • The custodial parent is responsible for the welfare of a minor child until that child reaches the legal age of majority or

the custody order is changed by the court.

Law enforcement will not intervene in a situation where an older child leaves the custodial parent's residence to live with the non custodial parent unless the minor is considered to be endangered in some manner or there is a court order.

The custodial parent would need to an order from the court to return the minor to his or her residence. These kind of matters can become complicated if the non custodial parent is under court ordered child support, has supervised or restricted visitation rights, etc.

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If He Have Full Custody Then He Doesn't Have To .

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If you have a court order of the custody agreement you can call the police.

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He would have to petition the court. Unless the mother is unfit though he will get shared custody.

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If a child is born out of wedlock in Georgia, the father must file a petition seeking legitimation through the courts to become the legal father. Putting a name on a birth certificate is not sufficient. In the legitimation proceeding, the court has the authority to make custody determinations. If the father has not filed for legitimation, he is a legal stranger to the child, and has no rights to custody.

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The mother. The father have to petition the court for custody or visitation right.

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Since there is no court order and you were never married it is the mother that have custody. He can be charged with kidnapping.

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No that is up to the judge. The father has no such authority. All he can do is provide truthful and sufficient evidence to the court as to why the mother shouldn't have custody. The court will evaluate the situation and render a decision.If the father wants to give up custody the mother will be the next logical choice of the court. The only reasons why a mother would be denied custody is if she has been declared unfit or she refuses to take legal custody.

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The father must establish his paternity in the family court and petition for a visitation schedule and/or joint custody. The father should act immediately.

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If the children live with their mother in Florida and the father never established his paternity legally, a Georgia court would have no jurisdiction over the children. Their mother has sole legal custody. If the father wants to establish his "parental rights" he will need to establish his paternity where the children are domiciled. Once he has established that he is their father he can request joint custody or a visitation order and the mother can request a child support order if the children are to remain in her physical custody.If the parties want to make the change in custody by consent of the parties he should consult with an attorney to determine how that can be accomplished.If the children live with their mother in Florida and the father never established his paternity legally, a Georgia court would have no jurisdiction over the children. Their mother has sole legal custody. If the father wants to establish his "parental rights" he will need to establish his paternity where the children are domiciled. Once he has established that he is their father he can request joint custody or a visitation order and the mother can request a child support order if the children are to remain in her physical custody.If the parties want to make the change in custody by consent of the parties he should consult with an attorney to determine how that can be accomplished.If the children live with their mother in Florida and the father never established his paternity legally, a Georgia court would have no jurisdiction over the children. Their mother has sole legal custody. If the father wants to establish his "parental rights" he will need to establish his paternity where the children are domiciled. Once he has established that he is their father he can request joint custody or a visitation order and the mother can request a child support order if the children are to remain in her physical custody.If the parties want to make the change in custody by consent of the parties he should consult with an attorney to determine how that can be accomplished.If the children live with their mother in Florida and the father never established his paternity legally, a Georgia court would have no jurisdiction over the children. Their mother has sole legal custody. If the father wants to establish his "parental rights" he will need to establish his paternity where the children are domiciled. Once he has established that he is their father he can request joint custody or a visitation order and the mother can request a child support order if the children are to remain in her physical custody.If the parties want to make the change in custody by consent of the parties he should consult with an attorney to determine how that can be accomplished.

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If he has them and refuses to return them you can call the police. If you want him to have legal physical custody the both of you need to go back to court and have the custody order modified and the father's child support order terminated.

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The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.The father must petition the court for temporary custody.

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The other parent unless they lost custody because they were unfit. Then a relative can get it if they are interested or the child ends up in foster care.

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The father would be the favored person to get legal custody if the mother had custody and died unless he was found to be unfit to have custody.

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No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.No. If your father has custody you cannot make that decision until you reach eighteen unless your father consents to a change in the custody order.

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If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.If the father has legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has joint legal custody, no. Not without his consent. If she has sole legal custody, yes.

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If the son wants to I believe he can. In my state (Georgia) the child can choose who he/she wants to live with at the age of 14.

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Joint custody is between two parents, which are usually a mother and a father.

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No, the mother is no more entitled to custody than the father. If the father currently has temporary or implied custody, then a custody order must first be established before you can get partial custody or visitation rights. For example, if you moved out and left the child in the care of the father, you forfeited your custody rights until an official custody order has been established.


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