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Answered 2009-12-07 14:35:50

In general, no. (I suppose the answer might be different if she married Donald Trump.)

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Yes. They are still the child's parent and responsible for supporting their child.


No - the new spouse isn't responsible for other men's children.


It depends on the state. Most states do not take a new spouse's income into account when determining the child support amount, so even if the custodial parent remarries, child support amounts are likely to stay the same.


You don't. Child support is by definition, the non-custodial parent paying to help cover the child-rearing expenses incurred by the custodial parent. Support payments are set by the court and the court would have to stop it. If the mother remarries and the new father adopts the child with your permission, then the child support stops.


Of course. The child is still your child and you must continue to pay child support unless the new spouse legally adopts your child. In that case, your parental rights would end.


The income of a spouse of a custodial parent, can be used in determing a portion of the child support. Because the spouse of a custodial parent is most likely contributing to the expense of the house, utilities and such, the non custodial parent may be intitled to a reduction in support.. this is usually a case that has to be heard by a judge. the income of a non custodial spouse can not be used as they are not contributing to the expenses of the home the children live in. If you think about it, this makes sense. a non custodial parent is paying their share based on the over all expense of the custodial parents home and income.. if the custodial parent is not paying for a portion of those expenses, then an non custodial parent should not have to pay them either.


No. Child support is paid by non custodial parent, not step parent. Income of a New Spouse: Contrary to common belief, Illinois law permits judges to consider the income of a second spouse when establishing or modifying child support awards. The door swings both ways, too. A custodial parent who remarries a well-to-do spouse may suffer a reduction in child support to be paid by the non-custodial parent.19 Likewise, a non-custodial parent who remarries a spouse of substantial means may be required by the court to pay a higher child support than if the marriage had not taken place. http://www.illinoisdivorce.com/family_law_articles/etsblishing_child_support.php



The CP's marriage should not affect the NCP's child support obligation.


Not automatically, but can be raised as a rebuttable presumption. see links


No. Support amounts are based upon the income and assets of the non custodial parent. The amount is not increased because the custodial parent is not employed because the money is for the support of the child not the custodial parent.


Well no, but if the custodial parent need benefits or financial support form the state the non-custodial parent will be asked by the state for child support. Parents are first responsible to support their child.


The non-custodial parent will be required to pay child support.The non-custodial parent will be required to pay child support.The non-custodial parent will be required to pay child support.The non-custodial parent will be required to pay child support.


If the custodial parent is on any public assistance he or she must attempt to collect financial support from the non custodial parent or they will be disqualified for public aid.


The income of your ex-spouse's partner is irrelevant to child support; only your ex-spouses income counts.


The custodial parent is the parent with custody/guardianship of the child.


No, the custodial parent does not have to work to get their support. The support goes from the child's other biological parent.Ê


custodial parent should take it to court. if the custodial parent keeps the child away from the non custodial parent then the custodial parent could do jail time



Contact your child support office or court that issued the child support order and request a modification of the child support order.


In Massachusetts: If there is a child support order (issued by the court) then the 'non-custodial' parent will have to pay child support to the 'custodial' parent until the child support order is modified by the court. Even if the kids actually live with the 'non-custodial' parent, that parent still has to follow the current court orders, no matter how unfair. If the kids are living with the non-custodial parent, though, it shouldn't be too difficult to go into court and get the child support order changed.


In general, the parent or guardian with the most parenting time is eligible to receive child support from the non-custodial parent. You do not need to be the child's biological parent to receive child support.


The child lives with you and you are entitled to child support from the non-custodial parent.The child lives with you and you are entitled to child support from the non-custodial parent.The child lives with you and you are entitled to child support from the non-custodial parent.The child lives with you and you are entitled to child support from the non-custodial parent.


If the non-custodial parent becomes the custodial parent they do not have to pay child support. It's the non-custodial who pay to the custodial who is the one who takes care of the child every day.


Child support is paid to the custodial parent. It must be paid until the child support order is modified.Child support is paid to the custodial parent. It must be paid until the child support order is modified.Child support is paid to the custodial parent. It must be paid until the child support order is modified.Child support is paid to the custodial parent. It must be paid until the child support order is modified.